Search results

Isaac Watts

WATTS, Isaac. b. Southampton, 17 July 1674; d. Stoke Newington, London, 25 November 1748. His Life and Ministry He was the eldest of nine children in a prosperous dissenting family. His father, who has been variously described as teacher, clothier and gentleman, was a deacon of the Above Bar Congregational Church. His mother's family, the Tauntons, were of Huguenot descent. Tradition has it that during the year of his birth he was breast-fed by his mother on the steps of the Old Town Gaol,...

Ride On, King Jesus

Ride On, King Jesus. African American spiritual*. Jesus was the Savior and a friend, human-and-yet-divine and yet the Son of God.  Because of their often brutal treatment, the slaves easily identified with his suffering in a very personal way. 'Were you there when they crucified MY Lord?' they sang. As Howard Thurman (1899-1981) said, 'He suffered, He died, but not alone—they were there with Him. They knew what He suffered; it was a cry of the heart that found a response and an echo in their...

Jesus, King of glory

Jesus, King of glory. W. Hope Davison* (1827-1894). This has the same first line, and is written in the same metre as a hymn by Edward Harland*, published in his Church Psalter and Hymnal (1855). According to JJ, Davison's hymn was first published in one of two 'Services of Song for Passiontide', but this has not been found: the hymn exists in papers held in Bolton Archives and Local Studies Collections, entitled 'Sermons & Lectures. W.H. Davison Senr.' Harland's hymn began: Jesus! King...

Rule of Benedict

The Rule of Benedict (RB), composed in the first third of the 6th century by an abbot active in central Italy about whom little is known, provides a comprehensive guide to the organization and discipline of a monastery. It prescribes a firm yet flexible pattern of monastic deportment and defines the role of the abbot as the kindly but strict father of the monks under his care. Chapters 8-20 concern the regulation of the monks' prayer in common, the 'opus dei,' over which nothing in the life of...

Isaac Smith

SMITH, Isaac. b. 1733/4, d. Newington, Surrey, 20 December 1805, aged 71. He may have come from East Anglia, judging by the names of many of his tunes. By trade a linen draper, he became clerk of the Alie Street Baptist meeting house, Whitechapel, London. Musically gifted, he led the unaccompanied singing there, while collecting, adapting and composing tunes for his choir and congregation. He is believed to have been the first dissenting precentor to have received a salary (£20 per annum). From...

Henricus Isaac

ISAAC [Ysaak, Ysac, Yzac], Henricus [Heinrich, Arrigo]. b. Flanders or Brabant, ca. 1450-55; d. Florence, 26 Mar 1517. He was born in Flanders or Brabant, but nothing else is known of his life before 1484, when a payment for his services as a composer appears in the Tyrolean court records, at Innsbruck. From 1485 to 1493 he was a singer at the baptistery of S. Giovanni in Florence. In 1496 he became court composer to Emperor Maximilian I. As one of the first internationally renowned musicians...

Isaac Williams

WILLIAMS, Isaac. b. Cwmcynfelin, near Aberystwyth, 12 December 1802; d. Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire, 1 May 1865. The son of a barrister-at-law, he was educated at Harrow School (1817-21) and Trinity College, Oxford (after periods of ill-health, he took a Pass rather than an Honours degree: BA 1826, MA 1831). As an undergraduate he was befriended and encouraged by John Keble*. He became a Fellow of Trinity College (1831) and took Holy Orders, becoming Newman*'s curate at the University Church...

Lord, be thy word my rule

Lord, be thy word my rule. Christopher Wordsworth* (1807-1885). This is a short confirmation hymn of two stanzas, first published in the Sixth Edition of The Holy Year (1872): Lord, be Thy word my rule, In it may I rejoice;Thy glory be my aim, Thy holy will my choice; Thy promises my hope; Thy providence my guard;Thine arm my strong support; Thyself my great reward. I. H. S. Stratton, writing in the Bulletin of the Hymn Society 113 (1968), pp. 230-1, points out that the hymn derives...

Thou who dost rule on high

Thou who dost rule on high. Robert Wesley Littlewood* (1908-1976). This hymn was printed in the School Hymn Book of the Methodist Church (1950), and thereafter in BHB, CH3, HP, and other books, normally set to ST JOHN (ADORATION), from The Parish Choir or Church Music Book, volume III (1851), edited by William Henry Monk*. It is unusual in that it is a prayer for airmen: it was written in 1939, at the beginning of the Second World War, for a Methodist Church at Portstewart, Northern...

What shall I render to my God (Watts)

What shall I render to my God (Watts). Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From The Psalms of David imitated in the Language of the New Testament (1719), where it is a metrical version of the second part of Psalm 116, beginning at verse 12. It was headed 'Vows made in Trouble paid in the Church; or, Publick Thanks for Private Deliverance'. It was later imitated by Charles Wesley* in a hymn with the same first line. Watts's text was as follows in 1719: What shall I render to my God   For all his...

King of glory, King of peace

King of glory, King of peace. George Herbert* (1593-1633). Published after Herbert's death as a poem in the collection The Temple (Cambridge, 1633) under the title 'Praise (II)', it was first used as a hymn by Robert Bridges* in the Yattendon Hymnal*. It derives inspiration from the psalms of praise, especially Psalm 116. It was originally in four-line stanzas. One of the seven stanzas of the original poem has been omitted and the remaining six conflated to form three stanzas in modern...

Come, Thou Almighty King

Come, Thou Almighty King. British 18th century, author unknown. According to JJ this appeared without an author's name in a four-page tract bound in with George Whitefield*'s Collection of Hymns for Social Worship in the edition of 1757, British Library copy. It is no longer in this copy, if it ever was (although the book is in a poor state, there is no sign that pages at the back have been forcibly removed; either they have somehow disappeared, or JJ made an error). It is bound in, as JJ...

The King of love my shepherd is

The King of love my shepherd is. Sir Henry Williams Baker* (1821-1877). This much-loved version of Psalm 23 was written by Baker sometime before 1868, when it appeared in the Appendix to the First Edition of A&M. It is notable for its skilful metre, and its well-managed rhyme scheme of single and double rhymes, which control and shape the emotion very beautifully. It was bold of Baker to undertake a metrical version of a psalm that was so well known and frequently paraphrased: he had...

Jesus shall reign where'er the sun

Jesus shall reign where'er the sun. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This paraphrase of the second part of Psalm 72 (verses 8-19) appeared in The Psalms of David (1719), with the title 'Christ's Kingdom among the Gentiles'. It had eight stanzas. Psalm 72 is one of the 'royal psalms' and is a prayer to God for King Solomon. In both parts of the paraphrase Watts makes the psalm refer to Christ (his usual procedure) and in the second part he begins by naming him: 'Jesus shall reign…'. He then uses the...

Sweet is the work, my God, my King

Sweet is the work, my God, my King. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From The Psalms of David (1719), with the title 'A Psalm for the Lord's Day', in seven stanzas. It is based on the first part of Psalm 92, verses 1-11. Some parts of the text are close to the Authorised Version of the Psalm, but taken as a whole it is also a remarkably free rendering, whilst at the same time keeping close to the original in sense and spirit. Stanza 2 introduces the Lord's Day (the day of sacred rest), and lines 3...

Hail Redeemer, King divine

Hail Redeemer, King divine. Patrick Brennan (1877-1952). This hymn appeared in four verses, with refrain (beginning 'Angels, saints and nations sing'), in WH (1940), set to a tune by Johann Schop*, WERDE MUNTER, originally composed for the hymn by Johann Rist*: Hail, Redeemer, King divine!Priest and Lamb, the throne is thine,King, whose reign shall never cease,Prince of everlasting peace.   Angels, saints and nations sing   'Praised be Jesus Christ, our King;   Lord of life, earth, sky and...

My God, my King, thy various praise

My God, my King, thy various praise. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). Watts made two versions of Psalm 145 for The Psalms of David (1719). This is the first, in Long Metre, entitled 'The Greatness of God' (the second is in three parts, in Common Metre). This version paraphrases only part of the psalm: a note says: 'The verses are paraphrased thus: 1, 2, 7, 8, 5, 6, 4, 3.' It appeared, with editorial changes, in the Baptist Psalms and Hymns (1858) and the New Congregational Hymn Book (1859), which gave...

Thomas King Ekundayo Phillips

PHILLIPS, Thomas King Ekundayo, b. Ondo State, Nigeria, 8 March 1884; d. Lagos, Nigeria, 10 July 1969. Born into the family of Bishop Charles Samuel Phillips of the Anglican Communion, he was the father of five children. Phillips graduated from Trinity College of Music, London (1914), majoring in organ and violin. He was the second Nigerian to receive a bachelor's degree in music from this institution. Phillips was appointed in 1914 to the position of Organist and Master of the Music at the...

Elisha J. King

KING, Elisha James.  b. (probably) Wilkinson County, Georgia, ca. 1821; d. Talbot County, Georgia, 31 August 1844.  King was co-compiler, along with B. F. White* of the First Edition of The Sacred Harp (Philadelphia, 1844). According to records found by a descendant of the King family, Elisha King was one of thirteen children born to John King (c.1785-1844) and Elizabeth DuBose King (1793-1861), and he was a grandson of Revolutionary army soldier Joel King (1750-c.1825).  It appears that the...

Children of the heavenly King

Children of the heavenly King. John Cennick* (1718-55). First published in Cennick's Sacred Hymns for the Children of God, in the Days of their Pilgrimage, Part III (1742). It had twelve stanzas, and was described in JJ as an 'Encouragement to Praise'. The text was shortened to six stanzas (1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8) by George Whitefield* in A Collection of Hymns for Social Worship (1753), and this was followed by Martin Madan* in his Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1760). In this six-stanza form it...

King of the universe, Lord of the ages

King of the universe, Lord of the ages. Michael Saward* (1932-2015). Published in its original form as the opening hymn in Songs of Worship (1980), this text was written at Beckenham more than ten years earlier (27 April 1970). The author was then the Church of England's Radio and Television Officer, and the hymn was sung on 19 June that year at Dalton House, the women's Bible and Missionary training college in Bristol, now part of Trinity College. It was then sung, as intended and usually...

The Advent of our King

The Advent of our King. Charles Coffin* (1676-1749), translated by John Chandler* (1806-1876). This Latin hymn, 'Instantis adventum Dei', was set for the Nocturn in Advent. It was translated by Chandler in The Hymns of the Primitive Church (1837), and altered by the compilers of the First Edition of A&M (1861). Chandler's translation began The Advent of our God Our prayers must now employ, And we must meet him on the road With hymns of holy joy. Chandler's 'God' is clearly closer...

O King of mercy, from Thy throne on high

O King of mercy, from Thy throne on high. Thomas Rawson Birks* (1810-1883). This paraphrase of Psalm 80 is from Birks's The Companion Psalter: or, Four hundred and fifty versions of the psalms, selected and original, for public or private worship (1874). In the Book of Common Prayer the Psalm begins 'Hear, O thou Shepherd of Israel', which gives Birks his stanza 2; but the translation is very free, omitting a number of awkward verses ('Thou hast made us a very strife unto our neighbours; and...

O King enthroned on high

O King enthroned on high. Greek, 8th century, translated by John Brownlie* (1857-1925). The Greek hymn, 'Basileu ouranie, Parakleite', is from the Pentecostarion, the office book of the Greek church, where it was used on the eve of Pentecost. It is an 8-line hymn (printed in Frost, 1962, p. 374), from which Brownlie made a four-stanza hymn for Pentecost, published in his Hymns of the Greek Church (1900). It was included in EH with a tune, TEMPLE, by Walford Davies*, and later in CP with a...

The glory of our King was seen

The glory of our King was seen. Margaret Cropper* (1886-1980). Companions give the first publication of this hymn as 1961, in Songs for Joy and then in Infant Praise (1964), but we have been unable to verify this. A third stanza was added when the hymn was first published in a hymnbook, in The Hymn Book of the Anglican Church of Canada and the United Church of Canada (1971). It was subsequently included in the British URC book, New Church Praise (1975), and then in HP, RS, and other books. It...

They all were looking for a king

They all were looking for a king. George MacDonald* (1824-1905). First published in A Threefold Cord: Poems by Three Friends (1883), a volume edited by MacDonald 'not to be had of any bookseller, but by application to Mr W. Hughes, 34 Beaufort Street, Chelsea, London'. It had three stanzas. It was republished, with a revised stanza 3, in The Poetical Works of George MacDonald (1893), where it was entitled 'That Holy Thing'. Percy Dearmer* came across it, and included it in SofP and SofPE....

They say it is a King

They say it is a King. Michael Field* (Katharine Harris Bradley (1846-1914) and Edith Emma Cooper (1862-1913).  This hymn was published in Mystic Trees (1913), published in the name of Michael Field, though containing poems by Bradley alone. Cooper, her niece and lover, had become a Roman Catholic in 1907, followed by Bradley not long after: her imaginative hymn on the Presentation of Christ in the Temple (Luke 2: 22-35) was included in the revised Westminster Hymnal (1940). It had five...

The eternal gifts of Christ the King

The eternal gifts of Christ the King. Latin, possibly St Ambrose* (339/340-397), translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). The Latin text, 'Aeterna Christi munera'*, is found in two forms, one continuing 'Et martyrum victorias', the other 'Et apostolorum victorias' (see JJ, p.24). It is referred to by Bede*, and is possibly by St Ambrose. Neale's translation of the 'form for Apostles' was first printed in The Hymnal Noted Part I (1851), and is much more widely used than the 'form for...

Lead on, O King eternal

Lead on, O King eternal. Ernest Warburton Shurtleff* (1862-1917). Written for Shurtleff's Andover Theological College graduation in 1888, and printed for that occasion; then in the American Presbyterian Hymnal (Philadelphia, 1895). It became very popular: it is found in American Methodist books from 1901 onwards, and is in UMH. It was taken into the American Episcopal Hymnal (1916), and remained in H40 and H82, sung (as in UMH) to LANCASHIRE by Henry Smart* (written for 'From Greenland's icy...

The flaming banners of our King

The flaming banners of our King. Venantius Fortunatus* (ca. 540- early 6th century), translated by John Webster Grant* (1919-2006). In The Hymnal 1982 Companion (Vol 3A, pp. 327-30), Grant traced alterations to the Latin text, 'Vexilla Regis prodeunt'* up to modern Roman missals used as sources for 37 English translations published by 1907, as noted by JJ (pp. 1219ff), and described the circumstances of its composition. He described its effect through the ages: 'Its strains…confirmed to the...

Rejoice, the Lord is king

Rejoice, the Lord is king. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). Contrary to JJ, this hymn was first published in Hymns for our Lord's Resurrection (1746), in six 6-line stanzas, not in A Collection of Moral and Sacred Poems (1744). It was not included in A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), but it appeared in the 1876 edition ('Wesley's Hymns') and has been included in most major hymnbooks throughout the English-speaking world. The original stanza 5 is now...

Jesus invites his saints

Jesus invites his saints. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book III, 'Prepared for the holy Ordinance of the Lord's Supper.' It has the title, 'Communion with Christ, and with Saints; 1 Cor.10.16,17.' The text is not a direct paraphrase, although stanza 5 lines 1-2 come close to 'For we being many are one bread, and one body…' (verse 17a). Bernard Manning* described Watts as setting out in stanza 3 'the high Sacramental doctrine of the Savoy Confession' in...

All for Jesus, all for Jesus

All for Jesus, all for Jesus. William John Sparrow-Simpson* (1859-1952). This was written as the closing chorus, entitled 'For the love of Jesus', in John Stainer*'s cantata The Crucifixion, first performed in Marylebone Parish Church, London, on Ash Wednesday, 24 February 1887. The hymn should not be confused with a piece by the American writer Mary Dagworthy James* (1810-1883), which begins 'All for Jesus, all for Jesus! All my being's ransomed powers'*, and which may have been known to...

Lyra Britannica (1867)

Lyra Britannica (1867)  Among the many published works of Charles Rogers* was Lyra Britannica (1867), described as being 'by the Rev Charles Rogers. LL.D.'(the degree had been conferred by Columbia College, New York, in 1853). It was a large anthology of hymns and sacred songs, arranged alphabetically by author, from Sarah Flower Adams* to Andrew Young*. There was an Appendix of 18 hymns, including hymns by Jane Crewdson* ('Mrs. Crewdson'), Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon* ('The...

O Jesu! King most wonderful

O Jesu! King most wonderful. Latin, probably 12th century, translated by Edward Caswall* (1814-78). In Caswall's Lyra Catholica (1849) this hymn follows 'Jesu! the very thought of Thee'*, preceded by the words '(The same continued)'. 'The same' refers to the Latin text beginning 'Iesu dulcis memoria'* (see under 'Jesu! the very thought of Thee'). It is set for Matins on the Second Sunday after Epiphany, the 'Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus'.  It is a translation of five stanzas beginning...

Let us sing the King Messiah

Let us sing the King Messiah. John Ryland* (1753-1825). Dated by Ryland's son 31 July 1790, this is a vigorous paraphrase of Psalm 45, printed in Hymns Included for the Use of the United Congregations of Bristol at their Monthly Prayer Meetings for the Success of the Gospel at Home and Abroad, begun in 1797 (Bristol, 1798). It had seven 6-line stanzas, of which five are found in BHB., beginning: Let us sing the King Messiah,  King of Righteousness and Peace:Hail Him, all His happy subjects, ...

Our king went forth to Normandy

Our king went forth to Normandy. English, 15th-century, author unknown. This is known as the 'Agincourt hymn'. It was written to celebrate the campaign of Henry V in France, culminating in the victory at Agincourt on St Crispin's Day (25 October) 1415. It had stanzas in English, beginning as above, and 'Burdens' or refrains in Latin, beginning 'Deo gracias, Anglia, redde pro victoria'. Burden I begins, and Burden II ends each stanza, as follows: Deo gracias, Anglia, redde pro Victoria Our...

Eternal Monarch, King most high

Eternal Monarch, King most high. Latin, author unknown, translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). The Latin text, 'Aeterne Rex altissime'* appears in many forms in different breviaries, sometimes associated with Vespers at the Feast of the Ascension. Neale's translation in six 4-line verses was made for The Hymnal Noted Part I (1851). It was much altered by the compilers of the First Edition of A&M, where it appears as 'O Lord most High, Eternal King'. It continued in this form until it...

My Maker and my King

My Maker and my King. Anne Steele* (1717-1778). From Poems on Subjects chiefly Devotional (1760), where it was entitled 'God my Creator and Benefactor'. It had six stanzas in Short Metre:   My Maker and my King,   To thee my all I owe; Thy sovereign bounty is the spring,   From whence my blessings flow.   Thou ever good, and kind,   A thousand reasons move, A thousand obligations bind,   My heart to grateful love.   The creature of thy hand,   On thee alone I live: My God, thy benefits...

The King of glory comes, the nation rejoices

The King of glory comes, the nation rejoices. Willard F. Jabusch* (1930- ). This hymn was written in 1966 and published in The Johannine Hymnal (Oak Park, Illinois, 1967). It was written for the tune GILU HAGALILIM, a tune of Eastern European origin brought to Israel by settlers after the First World War (Milgate, 1982, p. 99). It was arranged and used for these words by Betty Pulkingham* in Sound of Living Waters (1974). It has become very popular, especially in Australia, where it was printed...

Earth, rejoice, our Lord is King

Earth, rejoice, our Lord is King. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). From Hymns and Sacred Poems (1740), Part II, where it was entitled 'To be sung in a Tumult'. It had fourteen 4-line stanzas. It was not included in the 1780 Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists, but a shorter version, stanzas 1-2 and 9-12, was added in the supplement of 1831, with alterations to the original stanza 12: 1740 (verse 12)1831 (verse 6) Our Messias is come down, Points us to the...

Standing on the promises of Christ my King

Standing on the promises of Christ my King. Russell Kelso Carter* (1849-1928). First published in Songs of Perfect Love (1886), a book that Carter edited with John R. Sweney*. The hymn is still going strong, with the mesmerising repetitions of the chorus: Standing, standing,Standing on the promises of God my Saviour;Standing, standing,I'm standing on the promises of God. It has been extremely popular in the USA. It is found in Ira D. Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos, in five stanzas. These...

Christ is the King! O friends rejoice

Christ is the King! O friends rejoice. George Kennedy Allen Bell* (1883-1958). This hymn was written for SofPE (1931) to fit the Welsh tune LLANGOEDMOR, a tune that had appeared in RCH (1927). This is a 6-line tune, and Bell's hymn was originally written as four 6-line stanzas. The first was as follows: Christ is the King! O friends rejoice; Brothers and sisters, with one voice Make all men know he is your choice. Ring out ye bells, give tongue, give tongue! Let your most merry peal be...

Lord of Life and King of Glory

Lord of Life and King of Glory. Christian Burke* (1859-1944).  According to James Mearns*, this was written in December 1903 and printed in The Treasury (February 1904). It was entitled 'Prize Hymn for a Mothers' Union Service' (JJ, p. 1617). It was instantly picked up by the compilers of EH (1906), and was in the Fellowship Hymn Book soon after (1909, retained in 1933). It continued to be used in Congregational Hymnary (1916), MHB (1933), and A&MR (1950). In Ireland it was in ICH3 (1915,...

Ye servants of our glorious King

Ye servants of our glorious King. Hymns Ancient and Modern*, from various sources.  This is a translation of a stanzas from a hymn in the Roman Breviary of 1632, 'Christo profusum sanguinem', a 17th-century version of the martyrs' form of 'Aeterna Christi munera'*. It was used in the First Edition of A&M (1861) and subsequently. According to Frost (1962, p. 516) it consisted of the following stanzas:  stanza 1 by the compilers; stanzas 2 and 3 by Robert Campbell*, from Hymns and...

Praise, my soul, the King of heaven

Praise, my soul, the King of heaven. Henry Francis Lyte* (1793-1847). First published in Lyte's The Spirit of the Psalms (1834), as a free paraphrase of Psalm 103. It had five stanzas, with stanza 4 (corresponding to verses 15-17 of the Psalm) bracketed for omission. Many hymn books (though not RS) have accordingly left out this stanza: Frail as summer's flower we flourish; Blows the wind and it is gone; But, while mortals rise and perish, God endures unchanging on: Praise...

Good King Wenceslas looked out

Good King Wenceslas looked out. John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). First printed in Neale's Deeds of Faith (1849), a children's book, and then in his Carols for Christmastide (1853). The words were written to fit the tune of the carol, 'Tempus adest floridum'* ('Spring has now unwrapped the flowers') from Piae Cantiones (Greifswald, 1582). The cheerful verses retold a Bohemian legend, a simple story that was very appropriate for the Victorian era, of the need to be charitable to the poor. The...

Ye sons and daughters of the King

Ye sons and daughters of the King (Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!). Jean Tisserand* (d. 1494), translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This translation of the Latin hymn, 'O Filii et Filiae'*, was first published in Neale's Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (1851), in twelve stanzas. The Latin hymn has been attributed to Jean Tisserand, a Franciscan: it appeared in an untitled book, published in France between 1518 and 1536, with the heading 'L'aleluya du jour des Pasques'. It was used to...

Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation

Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation. Joachim Neander* (1650-1680), translated by Catherine Winkworth* (1827-1878). Neander's hymn, beginning 'Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren'*, was published in his A und Ω. Joachimi Neandri Glaub- und Liebesübung: auffgemuntert durch einfältige Bundes Lieder und Danck-Psalmen (Bremen, 1680). It has five stanzas. Catherine Winkworth's translation, in the metre of the original, was first published in The Chorale Book for...

At the name of Jesus

At the name of Jesus. Caroline Maria Noel* (1817-1877). First published in Noel's The Name of Jesus, and other Verses for the Sick and Lonely (Enlarged Edition, 1870). It was entitled 'Ascension Day' (it was not the poem that gave the title to the volume, which was a poem called 'The Name of Jesus'). It had eight stanzas. The Second Edition of A&M (1875) printed seven stanzas, and that has remained a customary text, although some books shorten to five stanzas (MHB, HP) or to four (RS). The...

Come, thou long-expected Jesus

Come, Thou long-expected Jesus. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns for the Nativity of our Lord (1744) in two 8-line stanzas. The Primitive Methodist Hymnal (1887, 1889) divided it into four 4-line stanzas, in which form it has since then almost invariably been printed. In verse 1, line 3, the original verb, 'relieve', was replaced by 'release' in the 1777 edition of the Nativity Hymns, and is now in general use: Come, Thou long-expected Jesus,  Born to set Thy people...

O heavenly King, look down from above

O heavenly King, look down from above. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742), entitled 'Another' [i.e. 'A Thanksgiving']. It followed 'O what shall I do my Saviour to praise'*, which was thus titled, and, like that hymn, this one was printed in 10-syllable lines with a space and a capital letter: 'O Heavenly King, Look down from above'. It was the second of three thanksgiving hymns in the same metre. This one is distinguished from the other two by its...

Crown of Jesus

Crown of Jesus (1862) was a major publication during the years of the expansion of the Roman Catholic church in Britain following Catholic Emancipation, the passing of the Roman Catholic Relief Bill in 1829, and the growth in numbers following immigration from Ireland and the converts from the Oxford Movement*. Library catalogues give the names of the editors as R.R. Suffield and C.F.R. Palmer. Its full title was Crown of Jesus: a complete Catholic manual of devotion, doctrine, and instruction....

Glory be to Jesus

Glory be to Jesus. Italian, possibly 18th-century, translated by Edward Caswall* (1814-1878). This is a translation of an Italian text beginning 'Viva! Viva! Gesu! Che per mio bene', found in an undated Raccolta di Orazioni e Pie Opere colle Indulgenze. An Italian priest named Galli, who died in 1845, was given as the author in a translation published in 1880. The hymn was at one time said to be by St Alphonsus Liguori*, but there is no evidence for this. Caswall translated the seven Italian...

All praise to thee, for thou, O King divine

All praise to thee, for thou, O King divine. F. Bland Tucker* (1895-1984). Written in 1938 on Philippians 2: 5-11. It was written for the tune SINE NOMINE, by Ralph Vaughan Williams*, although set in H40 (for copyright reasons) to ENGELBERG, by Charles Villiers Stanford*. It has been frequently used in subsequent books: it is very popular in Britain, and is found in 100HfT and thus in A&MNS, NEH and A&MCP. A modernized version, to avoid 'thee' (but not wanting 'All praise to you...')...

God save our gracious Queen (King)

God save our gracious Queen/King (British National Anthem). The first recorded performance of this hymn was at Drury Lane theatre, 28 September 1745, during the reign of George II, in response to the threat posed by the Jacobite rebellion in Scotland. It began 'God bless our noble King;/ God save great George our King;/ God save the King', with music arranged by Thomas Arne (1710-1778), the director of music at the theatre. It had been published one year earlier, in Thesaurus Musicus (1744)....

The Lord is King! Lift up thy voice

The Lord is King! Lift up thy voice. Josiah Conder* (1789-1855). First published in Conder's The Star in the East; with Other Poems (1824), with the heading '“Hallelujah! For the Lord God Omnipotent reigneth.” – Rev.xix.6.' It was then included in The Congregational Hymn Book (1836), edited by Conder. It had eight stanzas, which have usually been shortened to six or five. The stanza most frequently omitted is the original verse 6: O when his wisdom can mistake, His might decay, his love...

King of my life, I crown thee now

King of my life, I crown thee now. Jennie E. Hussey* (1874-1958). First published in New Songs of Praise and Power, No 3 (1921), with a tune by William J. Kirkpatrick* entitled DUNCANNON or LEST WE FORGET. The second title refers to Hussey's well-known refrain: Lest I forget Gethsemane, Lest I forget thine agony, Lest I forget thy love to me, Lead me to Calvary. The hymn has appeared in many evangelical books on both sides of the Atlantic: in Britain it is found in Praise! (2000) in...

O Lord most High, eternal King

O Lord most high, eternal King. Latin, 9th century or earlier, translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866), altered by the Compilers of A&M . This is a version of Neale's translation of 'Aeterne Rex altissime'*, the anonymous Latin hymn for Ascensiontide, much altered by the Compilers. It was printed in the First Edition of A&M in six stanzas:                         Neale                                                               A&M  (1861) Eternal Monarch, King most high,   ...

We have a king who rides a donkey

We have a king who rides a donkey. Frederik Herman Kaan* (1929-2009). Written in 1968 for a Family Service at the Pilgrim Church, Plymouth, where the author was minister, and published in Pilgrim Praise (1968). It is a children's hymn, written (in the author's word) 'unashamedly' to the sea-shanty tune of 'What shall we do with a drunken sailor' (repeated 3 times)/ 'Early in the morning?' The 'drunken sailor' motif, and the setting in the early morning, led the author to make a whimsical...

God, my King, thy might confessing

God, my King, thy might confessing. Richard Mant* (1776-1848). This is a metrical version of Psalm 145, 'I will extol thee, my God, O king'. It was first published in Mant's The Book of Psalms, in an English Metrical Version (1824), and in the USA in Psalms, in Metre Selected from the Psalms of David; suited to the Feasts and Fasts of the Church (New York, 1832). It has been very well regarded in the USA: it was used by the Protestant Episcopal Church as early as 1832 in a 'Selection of...

O Christ the Lord, O Christ the King

O Christ the Lord, O Christ the King. Reginald Thomas Brooks* (1918-1985). Brooks was a student at Mansfield College at the same time as George Bradford Caird*. The two men were born in the same place (Wandsworth, south London) within a year of each other (Caird, July 1917; Brooks, June 1918). This hymn was written at Mansfield College in 1941 as an entry for the Scott Psalmody Prize. The prize went to Caird for 'Almighty Father, who for us thy Son didst give'*; but Brooks's hymn was printed...

Teach me, my God and King

Teach me, my God and King. George Herbert* (1593-1633). From Herbert's collection The Temple (Cambridge, 1633), published after his death. It was included in EH, set to a West Country tune SANDYS, from William Sandys*'s Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833), with which it has since been almost always associated. Perhaps by virtue of its modern sensibilities about finding the divine in the everyday and the accessibility of God to all, it has remained very popular as a hymn in spite of its...

Hark! the herald angels sing (Jesus the light of the world)

Hark! the herald angels sing (Jesus the light of the world). Arranged by George D. Elderkin (1845–1928).  Gospel musical traditions in the United States have enlivened the 18th-century hymns for over 150 years. Those by Isaac Watts*, Charles Wesley*, and John Newton* were among those heard by those influenced by the Second Great Awakening (c. 1795–1835), during which rural whites and enslaved Africans reinvented and reinterpreted hymns from England for their own situation. The enlivening of...

O King of kings, Whose reign of old

O King of kings, Whose reign of old. William Walsham How* (1823-1897) This hymnological curiosity was commissioned for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897. It was included in a pamphlet published for the occasion, 'to be used in all Churches and Chapels in England and Wales, and in the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, upon Sunday the Twentieth day of June, 1897' (Berwick, on the border between England and Scotland, was technically in neither country at that time). It skilfully contrasted...

O God of love, O King of peace

O God of love, O King of peace. Henry Williams Baker* (1821-1877). Written for the First Edition of A&M (1861), where it appeared in the section 'In times of Trouble'. It was preceded by ''The Lord shall give His people the blessing of peace' (Psalm 29: 10 in the Book of Common Prayer). It was entitled 'War', and was evidently intended to be sung in time of war: the last line of each verse is 'Give peace, O God, give peace again'. Although the nation was not at war in 1861, the Crimean War...

Sing we the King who is coming to reign

Sing we the King who is coming to reign. Charles Sylvester Horne* (1865-1914). First published in The Fellowship Hymn Book (1909) with the title 'The New “Glory Song”'. This refers to a hymn by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel* beginning When all my labours and trials are o'er, And I am safe on that beautiful shore, This hymn had the refrain 'Oh, that will be…glory for me…glory for me…glory for me…'. Horne wrote his hymn to supplant Gabriel's words, although it is usually sung to Gabriel's tune...

The Lord is King! I own his power

The Lord is King! I own his power. Darley Terry* (1847-1933). The Methodist history of this hymn is strange. It was not selected for MHB, although Terry represented the United Methodist Church on the committee ; but it was sung at the Royal Albert Hall during the service to celebrate Methodist Union in 1932. It is not known to Methodists today except in The School Hymn Book of the Methodist Church (1950). It was first published in The Methodist School Hymnal (1911), to which it was submitted...

Jesus only is my motto

Jesus only is my motto. Charles Price Jones* (1865-1949). Regarded as Jones's signature hymn, 'Jesus Only' was written in 1899, two years after Jones's first Holiness Convention. It appeared initially as No. 1 in the author's Jesus Only, Songs and Hymns (Jackson, Mississippi, 1901) and remains the first hymn in the most recent Church of Christ (Holiness) USA hymnal, His Fullness Songs (Jackson, 1977). At the time of its composition, Jones had firmly been rejected by many Baptists in Jackson...

All creatures of our God and King

All creatures of our God and King. William Henry Draper* (1855-1933). This is a free versification of the 'Cantico di frate sole'* of St Francis. It was written for a children's Whitsuntide Festival at Adel, Leeds, when Draper was the incumbent at Adel, between 1899 and 1919. Draper could not remember the exact year in which he wrote the translation, but it was published in the Public School Hymn Book (1919), so it was known before that book was compiled. It was written to be sung to the tune...

Praise, O praise our God and King

Praise, O praise our God and King. Sir Henry Williams Baker* (1821-1877). Written for the First Edition of A&M (1861) and printed there in the 'Harvest' section, with the first two lines of the tune as 'Semi-Chorus' and the second two as 'Chorus', and the instruction 'The first and last verses to be sung in Chorus, the others as above'. It appeared beneath the text: 'Who giveth food to all flesh; for His mercy endureth for ever' (from Psalm 136:25). It has remained in the A&M tradition...

Thee will I love, my God and King

Thee will I love, my God and King. Robert Bridges* (1844-1930). From Part IV of the Yattendon Hymnal (1899). It was designed to accompany the tune by Claude Goudimel* for the 138th Psalm in the Genevan Psalter* (1551). In YH it was 'set by M.M.B.' (Mary Monica, Bridges's wife, née Waterhouse, 1863-1949). It was carefully written by Bridges to fit the unusual but magnificent tune: Percy Dearmer*, who called Bridges 'a past master of the craft', noted when annotating this hymn that 'the musical...

God the all-terrible! King, who ordainest

God the all-terrible! King, who ordainest. Henry Fothergill Chorley* (1808-1872). Chorley's career as a musical journalist put him in touch with John Pike Hullah*, for whom this hymn was written in order to find words for RUSSIAN HYMN or RUSSIAN ANTHEM), the recently composed (1833) National Anthem of Russia. It was published in Hullah's Part Music (1842), entitled 'In Time of War', and later in Edward Henry Bickersteth*'s Psalms and Hymns (n.d., but ca. 1858). Chorley's hymn begins with a...

O worship the King, All-glorious above

O worship the King, All-glorious above. Sir Robert Grant* (1780-1838). First published in Edward Bickersteth*'s Christian Psalmody (1833), then in Henry Venn Elliott's Psalms and Hymns for Public, Private and Social Worship (1835); and again in the collection of Grant's hymns and poems published by his brother Charles Grant, Lord Glenelg* after Robert's death, entitled Sacred Poems. By the late Right Hon. Sir Robert Grant (1839). Alterations were made to the text for publication in The Hymnal...

Jesus, Jesus, Oh, what a wonderful Child

Jesus, Jesus, Oh, what a wonderful Child ('Glory to the Newborn King'). Margaret Wells Allison* (1921-2008). Philadelphia musician Margaret Wells Allison started her gospel career at a young age by accompanying a group called the Spiritual Echoes, but just a few years later, she had a vision for a group of her own. In 1945, she recruited her sister Josephine Wells McDowell, plus Ella Mae Norris and Lucille Shird, and formally launched the new quartet as the Angelic Gospel Singers. Initially,...

Jesus is coming to earth again

Jesus is coming to earth again. Lelia Morris* (1862-1929). First published in a book of gospel songs, The King's Praises, no 3 (Philadelphia, 1912), edited by Henry J. Gilmour, George W. Sanville, William J. Kirkpatrick* and Melvin J. Hill. Its date is normally given as 1912, but whether this refers to composition or publication is not clear. It is found in many evangelical books of the 20th century in the USA, including the Billy Graham Campaign Songs of 1950, successive editions of the...

Take the name of Jesus with you

Take the name of Jesus with you. Lydia Odell Baxter* (1809-1874). Written ca. 1870, this hymn was published in Pure Gold for the Sunday School (1871), compiled by Robert Lowry* and William Howard Doane*. It was included in Ira D. Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos, and it remained in use in 20th-century books. It is sometimes known as 'Precious name', from the refrain: 'Precious name, O how sweet!/ Hope of earth and joy of heaven'. In view of the journey metaphor implied in 'Take…with you', it...

We would see Jesus

We would see Jesus. John Edgar Park* (1879-1956). Beginning 'We would see Jesus, lo! his star is shining', this hymn was published in Worship and Song (1913) with a tune by Herbert B. Turner called CUSHMAN. The first line is sometimes said to be taken from the hymn by Anna Bartlett Warner*, 'We would see Jesus, for the shadows lengthen', but both hymns originate with John 12: 20-21. The first stanza suggests that it will be a Christmas or Epiphany hymn: We would see Jesus, lo! his star is...

Lord Jesus, think on me

Lord Jesus, think on me. Possibly by Synesius of Cyrene* (ca. 370- ca. 414), translated by Allen William Chatfield* (1808-1896). This text was printed in Anthologia Graeca Carminum Christianorum, edited by W. von Christ and M. Paranakis (Leipzig, 1871). Synesius is believed to have written ten hymns, of which this is the last, although some authorities attribute them to a scribe. Chatfield's translation appeared in his Songs and Hymns of Earliest Greek Christian Poets, Bishops and Others...

Jesus, I live to Thee

Jesus, I live to Thee. Henry Harbaugh* (1817-1867). This simple but profound hymn of consecration is the best known of Harbaugh's works, and one of the best known hymns of the German Reformed Church tradition. It is not known if Harbaugh wrote it when he was pastor of First Reformed Church, Lancaster, Pennsylvania (1850-60) or when he was at St John's, Lebanon, Pennsylvania (1860-64) (see Haeussler, 1952, pp. 286-7). Its first appearance in print seems to have been in Hymns and Chants: with...

Missions and mission hymnody, Britain and Ireland

Missions and mission hymnody, Britain and Ireland The idea of 'Mission' is as old as the church itself. One of the last commands of our Lord was to the disciples: 'Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature' (Mark 16: 15), and the events of the first Pentecost (Acts 2) were those of inspiration followed by preaching and healing. Since that time, it has always been a priority of the church to spread the gospel to places where it has not been heard. St Patrick became the...

Jesus Christ is risen today

Jesus Christ is risen today. Author unknown, from Lyra Davidica (1708). Entitled 'The Resurrection', this was in three stanzas in 1708: Jesus Christ is Risen to day, Halle-Hallelujah Our triumphant Holyday Who so lately on the Cross Suffer'd to redeem our loss. Hast ye Females from your Fright, Take to Galilee your Flight: To his sad Disciples say, Jesus Christ is Risen to Day. In our Paschal Joy and Feast, Let the Lord of Life be blest, Let the Holy Trine be prais'd, And...

Jesus, high in glory

Jesus, high in glory. Harriet Burn McKeever* (1807-1886 or 1887).  In JJ, p. 1574, this hymn is noted as from the Methodist Episcopal Church's Sunday School Harmonist (1847), without an author's name. McKeever was identified as the author when it appeared in her Twilight Musings: and Other Poems (Philadelphia, 1857) (JJ, p. 1667). It became very popular in the USA and Canada, appearing in many hymnals, mainly those for Sunday schools and young people. It crossed the Atlantic to appear in the...

Since Jesus freely did appear

Since Jesus freely did appear. John Berridge* (1716-1793). This is by far the best known of Berridge's hymns. According to JJ (p. 1059), it appeared in the Gospel Magazine (August 1775), entitled 'A Wedding Hymn', and signed with Berridge's pseudonym, 'Old Everton'. It was included in Berridge's Sion's Songs or Hymns: Composed for the Use of Them that Love and Follow Jesus Christ in Sincerity (1785), prefaced with '“There was a marriage in Cana, and Jesus was invited to the Marriage,” John ii....

I saw the cross of Jesus

I saw the cross of Jesus. Frederick Whitfield* (1829-1904). Published in Whitfield's Sacred Poems and Prose (Dublin, 1859) in four 8-line stanzas. It was entitled 'The Cross'. It is an interesting precursor of gospel hymnody in its concentration on sin and redemption through the blood: I saw the cross of Jesus, When burdened with my sin; I sought the cross of Jesus, To give me peace within; I brought my soul to Jesus, He cleansed it in His blood; And in the cross of Jesus ...

There is no love like the love of Jesus

There is no love like the love of Jesus. William Edensor Littlewood* (1831-1886). From Littlewood's A Garland from the Parables (1858), written when Littlewood was either just beginning a curacy at Wakefield, or earlier. It was prefaced by the quotation: 'I am the Good Shepherd; the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep. – John x. 11.' It had six stanzas in 1858: There is no love like the love of Jesus,   Never to fade or fall 'Till into the fold of the peace of God   He has gathered us...

Who'll be the next to follow Jesus

Who'll be the next to follow Jesus. Annie Sherwood Hawks* (1835-1918). According to Taylor, pp. 222-3, this was published by Bethany Sabbath School, Philadelphia, in Precious Hymns (ca. 1870), and later in The Christian Mission Magazine (August 1876). It appeared in many American books in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, usually those associated with revival or holiness meetings, such as Revival Hymns (1889), Pentecostal Hymns No. 3: a winnowed collection for evangelical services, young...

Sleep, my little Jesus

Sleep, my little Jesus. William Channing Gannett* (1840-1923). Written in 1882 for the Sunday school when Gannett was minister at St Paul, Minnesota, between 1877 and 1883. It was entitled 'Mary's Manger Song'. It was published in The Thought of God in hymns and poems, Second Series (Boston, 1894) which Gannett edited with Frederick Lucian Hosmer*. It has three verses, beginning: Sleep, my little Jesus,/ On Thy bed of hay Sleep, my little Jesus /While Thou art my own Sleep my little Jesus/...

When Jesus wept

When Jesus wept. William Billings* (1746-1800)   When Jesus wept, the falling tear In mercy flowed beyond all bound. When Jesus groaned, a trembling fear Seized all the guilty world around.  Perhaps the most frequently republished work of William Billings (Edwards, p. 7), 'When Jesus Wept' was first published in his 1770 collection titled The New-England Psalm-Singer. This volume of music, the first book of music entirely composed by an American born in America, consisted of more than 120...

Jesus, stand among us

Jesus, stand among us. William Pennefather* (1816-1873). Written for one of the Mildmay Conferences on home and foreign missions, and therefore probably first published in leaflet form. It then appeared in Pennefather's Original Hymns and Thoughts in Verse (1875), with the heading '“Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent Me, even so send I you” — John xx. 21.' It is also based on Luke 24:36 (John 20: 26): 'Jesus himself stood in the midst of them…'. The usual...

Fairest Lord Jesus

Fairest Lord Jesus. German, 17th century, translated by several hands. Three stanzas of this hymn are taken from the version published by Richard Storrs Willis (1819-1900), in his Church Chorals and Choir Studies (New York, 1850), which printed the English and German texts:     Fairest Lord Jesus!     Ruler of all nature!   O Thou of God and Man the Son!     Thee will I cherish,     Thee will I honor,   Thou! my soul's glory, joy, and crown.     Fair are the meadows,     Fairer still the...

Jesus! What a friend for sinners

Jesus! What a friend for sinners. John W. Chapman* (1859-1918). Written in 1910, when Chapman's campaign success (with Charles M. Alexander*) was at its height. It had five stanzas, with a refrain. It was given the title 'Our Great Savior': Jesus! What a Friend for sinners!Jesus! Lover of my soul!Friends may fail me, foes assail me,He, my Savior, makes me whole. Refrain:... Hallelujah! What a Savior! Hallelujah! What a Friend! Saving, helping, keeping, loving, He'll be with me to the...

Living for Jesus, a life that is true

Living for Jesus, a life that is true. Thomas O. Chisholm* (1866-1960). Written in 1917 at the request of the composer, organist, and editor (Carl) Harold Lowden (1883-1963). In 1915 Lowden composed a song for Children's Day titled 'Sunshine song'. According to William J. Reynolds* (who was the first to piece together the story of this hymn) Lowden 'early in 1917, while preparing a collection of hymns for publication came across this song and was impressed that the tune needed a stronger text...

Follow the paths of Jesus

Follow the paths of Jesus. Christopher Rubey Blackall* (1830-1924). According to JJ, p. 144, this hymn was included in the Baptist Hymn and Tune Book for Public Worship (Philadelphia, 1871). It was also found in the 1903 edition. It is one of the few hymns by Blackall not addressed explicitly to children or young people. Nevertheless, it is full of the kind of imperatives that might be expected of a Sunday-school superintendent: Follow the path of Jesus,   Walk where His footsteps lead, Keep...

Jesus is all the world to me

Jesus is all the world to me. Will L. Thompson* (1847-1909). First published in The New Century Hymnal (East Liverpool, Ohio: The Will L. Thompson Co., 1904). Thompson edited and published this collection, intended as a hymnal for the 20th century. The hymn had four stanzas in parlor-song mode, reiterating the description of Jesus as friend: Jesus is all the world to me, my life, my joy, my all;He is my strength from day to day, without him I would fall.When I am sad, to him I go,No other one...

Jesus of Nazareth passeth by

Jesus of Nazareth passeth by. Various authors. There are three texts with this title: 1. A poem beginning 'Watcher, who watchest by the bed of pain' by Lydia Huntley Sigourney*. The contents suggest that it was written during, or shortly after, the illness of her son, Alexander Maximilian, who died aged 19 in 1850 (three of her five children had earlier died in infancy). It describes vividly the nurse of a sufferer, 'Holding thy breath, lest his sleep should break', followed by three stanzas...

Deeper, deeper in the love of Jesus

Deeper, deeper in the love of Jesus. Charles Price Jones* (1865-1949). According to some sources, this hymn was written in 1900 and appeared in the author's Jesus Only, Songs and Hymns (Jackson, Mississippi, 1901) and later in His Fullness Songs (Nashville, Tennessee, 1906). The hymn has been included in approximately 70 hymnals since that time, most recently in the African American Heritage Hymnal (Chicago, 2001). Though Philippians 1: 9 is given as a source in the hymnal, Jones cited his...

Jesus, I will trust Thee

Jesus, I will trust Thee. Mary Jane Walker* (1816-1878). First published in the 1864 edition of her husband Edward Walker's Psalms and Hymns for Public and Social Worship, originally dated 1855, with an Appendix in 1864. It became widely known after Ira D. Sankey* wrote a tune for it and used it in his evangelistic campaigns before printing it in Sacred Songs and Solos. It became a feature of evangelistic meetings: Sankey (1906, p. 130) recounts an episode at a Belfast meeting led by Daniel...

Listen to the voice of Jesus

Listen to the voice of Jesus. George Bett Blanchard* (1856-1927). This is one of many hymns written by Blanchard for Sunday-School Anniversaries in his Wesleyan Methodist Church in Hull, Yorkshire. Based on Mark 10: 13-16, it is written in the unusual metre of 8.3.8.3.D: Listen to the voice of Jesus,  O so sweet!As the little children gather  Round his feet;Young ones to his knees are climbing,  There to rest;Older ones stand round him waiting  To be blest. The hymn received wider...

Let us look to Jesus

Let us look to Jesus. F.M. Hamilton* (1858-1912). From Songs of Love and Mercy:Adapted to the Use of Sunday Schools, Epworth Leagues, Revivals, Prayer Meetings, and Special Occasions (Jackson, Tennessee, 1904). It is a good example of Hamilton's sensitivity to the world around him as well as to his own 'world full of sorrow'. In this hymn, which includes an allusion to the African American Spiritual 'There is a Balm in Gilead'*, he calls believers to 'look to Jesus' to bear their burdens, to...

Jesus, Saviour, pilot me

Jesus, Saviour, pilot me. Edward Hopper* (1816-1888). This text was written at the request of George S. Webster, secretary of the Seaman's Friend Society, and first published in The Sailor's Magazine and Seamen's Friend, the magazine of the Society, and dated 3 March 1871. It was not anonymous, as is sometimes stated: 'By Rev Edward Hopper, D.D., Pastor of the Church of the Sea and Land' is clearly indicated. It was given a tune, PILOT, by John Edgar Gould (1822-1875) for The Baptist Praise...

There's not a friend like the lowly Jesus

There's not a friend like the lowly Jesus. Johnson Oatman, Jr.* (1856-1922). Written ca. 1895, and published in Heaven's Echo (Philadelphia, 1895), edited by George C. Hugg. The refrain and every verse end 'No, not one! No, not one!', by which the hymn is sometimes known. It had five stanzas with a refrain: There's not a Friend like the lowly Jesus;No, not one! No, not one!None else could heal all our soul's diseases:No, not one! No, not one! Refrain: Jesus knows all about our struggles;He...

Tell me the stories of Jesus

Tell me the stories of Jesus. William Henry Parker* (1845-1929). According to JJ (p. 1686) this was written ca. 1885, and it is sometimes stated that it was first published in leaflet form for a Sunday School Anniversary at Chelsea Street Baptist Church, Basford, Nottingham (Companion to Hymns & Psalms, 1988, p. 118). However, when it was printed in the Sunday School Hymnary (1905), it was signed 'W.H. Parker, 1904' (see Gordon Taylor, Companion to the Song Book of the Salvation Army,...

Hark! the voice of Jesus calling

Hark! the voice of Jesus calling. Albert Midlane* (1825-1909). This hymn was written in August 1860 and first published in The Ambassadors' Hymn Book (1861). This was a book of one hundred hymns, published by the Gospel Tract Depot, of which 49 are stated to be by Midlane in manuscript notes in the British Library copy. It was then published in Midlane's Gospel Echoes, or, Help to the heralds of salvation (1865). Although beginning with the text from Matthew 11: 28 ('Come unto me, all ye that...

Sing the wondrous love of Jesus

Sing the wondrous love of Jesus. Eliza E. Hewitt* (1851-1920). First published in Pentecostal Praises (1898). It is frequently known by the first line of the refrain, 'When we all get to heaven' (See Companion to UMH, 1993, p. 699). If this line sounds over-confident, it should be remembered that the hymn came out of the post-Civil War camp meeting tradition which the author and tune-writer experienced at Ocean Grove, New Jersey (see 'More about Jesus would I know'*). Carlton R. Young* has...

All to Jesus I surrender

All to Jesus I surrender. Judson W. Van De Venter* (1855-1939). Van De Venter was torn between his ambition to be a great artist, and the call to be an evangelist. While supporting himself by teaching art in Pennsylvania, he resisted the encouragement of those who thought he should be an evangelist. The hymn was written 'in memory of the time, when, after a long struggle, I had surrendered and dedicated my life to active Christian service' (Reynolds, 1964, p. 13). The word 'in memory of a...

Jesus Christ the Apple Tree

Jesus Christ the Apple Tree. Richard Hutton, or Richard Hutchins, 18th Century, dates unknown. The first line of this carol is 'The tree of life my soul hath seen'. It is found in Volume 1 of Divine, Moral, and  Historical Miscellanies, in Prose and Verse. Containing many Valuable Originals, Communicated by Various Correspondents, and other Pieces extracted from different Authors, and antient Manuscripts. The Whole being such a Collection of Miscellaneous Thoughts, as will tend not only to...

Jesus, we love to meet

Jesus, we love to meet.  Elizabeth Parson* (1812-1873) This hymn exists in several forms. It was written in the 'Thou' and 'Thee' form: 'Jesus, we love to meet/ On this, Thy holy day'. It has been modernized in some books to the 'you' form, 'On this, your holy day', as in the Psalter Hymnal (1987). It had three stanzas, and appeared in many books in the USA. A version is found in Methodist US hymnals (MH66, UMH). This is by the Nigerian musician and writer Olajida Olude*, translated by Biodun...

Cast thy care on Jesus

Cast thy care on Jesus. Frederick George Scott* (1861-1944). Written during Scott's time as rector of St George's, Drummondville, Quebec (1887-96), after hearing that a close friend was suffering from a terminal illness and had few months left to live. It was included in the Canadian Book of Common Praise (1908) of which Scott was one of the editors. It was retained in the revised Book of Common Praise (1938) and crossed the Atlantic to appear in the Irish CH4 (1960). JRW

There's no greater name than Jesus

There's no greater name than Jesus. Michael Baughen* (1930). Written ca. 1959, when Baughen was a curate at Reigate, evidently with a view to providing an accessible and attractive hymn for young people. It was included in a 'home-made' book for the parish, 'Zing-Sing', and then in Youth Praise 1 (1966). It is found in HFTC and Complete Mission Praise (1999), and in Praise! (2000), set to Baughen's tune written for it, NO GREATER NAME.   JRW

Jesus, humble was your birth

Jesus, humble was your birth. Patrick Appleford* (1925-2018). Published in Twenty-seven 20th Century Hymns (1965), one of the productions of the 20th Century Church Light Music Group, of which Appleford was a co-founder and prominent member. It became widely known through its inclusion in 100HfT (1969), and from there into A&MNS. It also appeared in NCP (1975) and in RS. Verse 3 was originally Jesus, when you were betrayed, Even on the Cross you prayed: Trusting in your Father's...

Jesus, our mighty Lord

Jesus, our mighty Lord. F. Bland Tucker* (1895-1984). This was printed in H40 with a first stanza beginning: Master of eager youth, Controlling, guiding, Lifting our hearts to truth, New power providing; Shepherd of innocence, Thou art our Confidence; To thee, our sure Defence, We bring our praises. The first stanza was omitted and stanza 2 changed from 'Thou art' to 'Jesus' in H82. The reason given was that the imagery seemed 'more congenial to modern thought' than the original...

Jesus in the olive grove

Jesus in the olive grove. Fred Pratt Green* (1903-2000). Written in 1965 as a short poem on the Passion. In 1967 the author added seven preceding verses and a one-verse conclusion, providing a hymn which spans the events of Holy Week. The full text, entitled 'A Hymn for Holy Week', beginning 'All is ready for the Feast!', is in The Hymns and Ballads of Fred Pratt Green (1982), pp. 8-9. The shorter version, entitled 'Passiontide Hymn' and beginning 'Jesus in the olive grove' is in 26 Hymns...

Sinners Jesus will receive

Sinners Jesus will receive. Erdmann Neumeister* (1671-1756), translated by Emma Frances Bevan* (1827-1909). This hymn by Neumeister, 'Jesus nimmt die Sünder an'*, was first published in his Evangelischer Nachklang (Hamburg, 1718), and became well known. It attracted several translations, of which this is the best known. It was first published in Bevan's Songs of Eternal Life, translated from the German (1858) with the title 'Song of Welcome'. It had eight 6-line verses, each ending with the...

Vem, Jesus, nossa esperança

Vem, Jesus, nossa esperança. Jaci C. Maraschin* (1929–2009).  This Advent text first appeared in a Brazilian collection edited by the author, O Novo Canto de Terra (São Paulo, 1987), in four 8.7.8.7 stanzas. The musical setting, CRISTO É MAIS (1980), is by Baptist music professor Marcílio de Oliveira Filho (1947–2005). It was originally paired with the text 'Cristo é nossa esperança' (1981) by Guilherme Kerr Neto (1953– ) in the Brazilian Baptist hymnal Hinário para o Culto Cristão (Rio di...

Jesus, the Conqueror, reigns

Jesus, the Conqueror, reigns. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788) First published in the two-volume Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), the title-page bearing Charles Wesley's name alone, in an extended section entitled 'Hymns for Believers'. It had sixteen stanzas, and was clearly too long for congregational use. In A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780) John Wesley* shortened it to six stanzas, divided into three parts, using stanzas 1-6. It was included in the section...

Jesus, Lord, we pray

Jesus, Lord, we pray. Basil Ernest Bridge* (1927-2021). Written at the request of the author's younger daughter, and sung at her wedding at Stamford United Reformed Church in 1978. Verse 1 refers to John 2: 1-11. Verse 3 lines 3-5 were originally 'help them now as they are taking/ solemn vows, your Spirit making/ love more strong than death'. They were revised at the suggestion of the compilers of MHfT (1980), through which the hymn became widely known. It is found in HP, HFTC, and...

Jesus, most generous Lord

Jesus, most generous Lord. Christopher Martin Idle* (1938- ). Written at Poplar, east London, in 1975, for two 'hymn searches' on the theme of 'Christian lifestyle'. After revisions suggested by Michael Perry*, it appeared in a collection for the Hambledon Valley group of parishes in Oxfordshire (1983). In the USA it was published in The Hymn (The Hymn Society of the United States and Canada, 1996). It is found in Come Celebrate  (Norwich, 2009), edited by Michael Saward*. It was written on 1...

Wonderful grace of Jesus

Wonderful grace of Jesus. Haldor Lillenas* (1885-1959). Words and music were written when Lillenas was pastor of the Church of the Nazarene, Auburn, Illinois (1916-1919). It was first sung at a Bible Conference at Northfield, Massachusetts, in 1918, and published in Tabernacle Choir (Chicago. Tabernacle Publishing Co., 1922), edited by Richard J. Oliver and Lance B. Latham. It has appeared in many books, such as Alexander's Hymns No 4 (Philadelphia, 1908), the Baptist Hymnal (1991, 2008), The...

Hark, the voice of Jesus crying

Hark, the voice of Jesus crying. Daniel March* (1816-1909). This hymn dates from an occasion in 1868. Commentators, beginning with Nutter (1884, p. 214) quote March himself as saying that this hymn was written 'in great haste' to follow a sermon he was to preach in Clinton Street Church to the Philadelphian Christian Association on the text Isaiah 6: 8: 'And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, Whom shall I send and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.' It was printed in...

Jesus, to Thy table led

Jesus, to Thy table led. Robert Hall Baynes* (1831-1895). This hymn for Holy Communion was first published in Baynes' The Canterbury Hymnal. A Book of Common Praise adapted to the Services in the Book of Common Prayer (1863), where it was entitled 'To know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge' (Ephesians 3: 19). It was in seven 3-line stanzas, beginning with an affecting simplicity: Jesus, to Thy table led,Now let every heart be fedWith the true and living Bread. It was found in RCH,...

Jesus wants me for a sunbeam

Jesus wants me for a sunbeam. Nellie Talbot* (?1871-?1959). According to Kelynack (1950, p. 428), followed by Taylor (1989, p. 97), this was written in London when the author visited as a delegate from her Sunday school. Unfortunately Kelynack does not give the source of this account: he says that she was 'inspired by the children of her host to write this hymn.' Another possibility is simply that it was written for the children of her Sunday school in Missouri. It was set to music by Edwin O....

Jesus, the word bestow

Jesus, the word bestow. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). This hymn was not published in Charles Wesley's lifetime, so that it was not included by John Wesley* in A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780). It was added in a later Supplement before 1831. In 'Wesley's Hymns' (1876) it was printed in two 8-line stanzas: Jesus, the word bestow,   The true immortal seed;. The gospel then shall greatly grow   And all our land o'erspread;   Through earth extended wide  ...

Jesus is our Shepherd

Jesus is our Shepherd. Hugh Stowell* (1799-1865).  Many of Hugh Stowell's hymns were written for children. This one is dated 1849 by JJ, p. 1097. It was published in the 12th Edition of his Selection of Psalms & Hymns Suited to the Services of the Church of England (Manchester, 1764). It had four stanzas:  Jesus is our Shepherd,  Wiping every tear; Folded in his bosom,  What have we to fear? Only let us follow  Whither He doth lead, To the thirsty desert  Or the dewy mead. Jesus is...

Jesus walked this lonesome valley

Jesus walked this lonesome valley. American Folk Hymn; African American spiritual*  The origins of this folk hymn, appropriate for Holy Week, are shrouded in obscurity. It first appeared in USA hymnals during the second half of the 20th century. Its frequency of inclusion increased by the end of the last century and continues into the current one. Although listed as an American Folk Hymn in most hymnals, its origins may be found in a conflation of the Appalachian folk song tradition and the...

Steal away to Jesus

Steal away to Jesus. African American spiritual*. In common with many African American spirituals, 'the first strain is of the nature of a chorus or refrain, which is to be sung after each verse' (Marsh/Loudin, 1898, p. 159). The pentatonic melody, harmonizations, and text exist in different versions (an account of the origin of this spiritual is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_Willis). One version is  exemplified by the Fisk Jubilee Singers*' text consisting of the refrain, 'Steal...

Jesus, thou divine companion

Jesus, thou divine companion. Henry van Dyke* (1852-1933). The first version of this hymn comes from Van Dyke's celebrated poem, The Toiling of Felix, printed in The Toiling of Felix, and Other Poems (New York, 1898). The sub-title of this was 'A Legend on a new saying of Jesus'. The 'new saying' was 'Raise the stone, and thou shalt find me; cleave the wood, and there am I' (from the Coptic Gospel of Thomas). It had four sections, entitled 'The Vision','The Student', 'The Hermit', 'The...

Jesus, still lead on

Jesus, still lead on. Count Nikolaus von Zinzendorf* (1700-1760), translated by Jane Laurie Borthwick* (1813-1897). This is a translation of a composite text, 'Jesu, geh voran', made (probably by Christian Gregor*) from two hymns by Zinzendorf for the Moravian Bruder Gesang-Buch of 1778. The hymns were 'Seelenbräutigam, O Du Gottes Lamm' (translated by John Wesley* as 'O Thou to whose all-searching sight'), and 'Glanz der Ewigkeit' ('Brightness of eternity'). The 1778 text was in four stanzas:...

Jesus, to Thee we fly

Jesus, to Thee we fly. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). This was the final hymn in Hymns for Ascension-Day, a small book of eleven pages first published in 1746, with a Second Edition in the same year. It had six stanzas:     Jesus, to Thee we fly,     On Thee for Help rely: Thou our only Refuge art,   Thou dost all our Fears control, Rest of every troubled Heart,   Life of every dying Soul.     We lift our joyful Eyes,     And see the dazling Prize, See the Purchase of thy Blood,   Freely now...

When Jesus came to Jordan

When Jesus came to Jordan. Fred Pratt Green* (1903-2000). This was written in 1973 at the request of an Australian theology student, Dirk van Dissel, who was at Trinity College, Melbourne at the time. According to Braley, van Dissel was concerned at the lack of a good hymn on the Baptism of Jesus for the forthcoming Australian Hymn Book (WOV, 1977). This three-stanza hymn was the result of correspondence between van Dissel and Pratt Green which 'discussed several drafts with immense care for...

Afflicted souls, to Jesus dear

Afflicted souls, to Jesus dear. John Fawcett* (1740-1817). Published in Fawcett's Hymns adapted to the circumstances of Public Worship and Private Devotion (Leeds, 1782). It was headed 'As thy days, so shall thy strength be. Deut. xxxiii 25.'. It had seven stanzas, each ending with graceful variations on the same line: Afflicted souls, to Jesus dear,Thy Saviour's gracious promise hear, His faithful word declares to thee, That as thy days, thy strength shall be. Let not thy heart despond and...

In loving-kindness Jesus came

In loving-kindness Jesus came. Charles Hutchinson Gabriel* (1856-1932). This hymn is perhaps better known by the first line of its refrain: From sinking sand He lifted me,With tender hand He lifted me;From shades of night to plains of light,Oh, praise His Name, He lifted me! It is characteristic of the author who was in the full flow of his revivalist oratory in the early years of the 20th century, associated with many vigorous and successful evangelistic campaigns of the time. This text...

Jesus, cast a look at me

Jesus, cast a look on me. John Berridge* (1716-1793). This is Berridge's re-writing of a hymn by Charles Wesley*, 'Lord, that I may learn of thee'*, in Wesley's Short Hymns on Select Passages of the Holy Scriptures (1762), from Isaiah 28:9.  Berridge altered three stanzas of Wesley's hymn (1, 3, 4), and added his own (2, 5, 6):                         Wesley                                                             Berridge Lord, that I may learn of thee,                              ...

O Jesus my hope

O Jesus my hope. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), Part I, the sixth in a series of nine 'Penitential Hymns' (cf. 'Stay, thou insulted Spirit, stay'*, which was the last of the series). In 1749 it had six stanzas, as follows: O Jesus my Hope,  For me offer'd up,Who with Clamour pursued Thee to Calvary's Top,  The Blood I have shed  For me let it plead,And declare,Thou has died in thy Murderer's stead..  Thy Blood, which alone For Sin could...

Through all the world let every nation sing to God the King

Through all the world let every nation sing to God the King. Bryan Jeffery Leech (1931-2015). Written in 1967 for a Missionary Conference at Calvary Baptist Church, New York City, and published in the July 1970 issue of The Hymn by the Hymn Society of America, New York, with a tune by Paul Liljestrand (1931-2011) named CONRAD (after the composer's father). It has subsequently appeared in several books, including Hymns for the Living Church (1974). JRW/CY

Beneath the cross of Jesus

Beneath the cross of Jesus. Elizabeth Cecilia Douglas Clephane* (1830-1869). First published anonymously in The Family Treasury, a Scottish religious magazine, in 1872. It appeared after Clephane's death, with other hymns by her, presumably sent to the magazine by a relative or friend. It appeared under the heading 'Breathings on the Border' (referring to the fact that Clephane had lived at Melrose, Roxburghshire, in the Scottish Border country). An editorial note said that these lines 'express...

It is finished! Blessed Jesus

It is finished! Blessed Jesus. William Dalrymple Maclagan* (1826-1910). Written for the Second Edition of A&M (1875), where it had ten stanzas, and was in the section entitled 'Hymns on the Passion'. It was shortened to eight stanzas in EH, omitting stanzas 4 and 6: 4. See! He comes, a willing Victim, Unresisting hither led; Passing from the Cross of sorrow To the mansions of the dead. 6. For Himself proclaims the story Of His own Incarnate life, And the...

Safe in the arms of Jesus

Safe in the arms of Jesus. Fanny Crosby* (1820-1915). Like 'To God be the glory, great things He hath done'*, this was first published in Songs of Devotion for Christian Associations (New York, 1870), edited by William Howard Doane*. It was written on 30 April 1868 in response to a request from Doane for words to fit his tune: according to Crosby, Doane came to her house on that day with the tune, and said that he had forty minutes before his train left for Cincinnati. She wrote the words in...

My Jesus I love Thee, I know Thou art mine

My Jesus, I love Thee, I know Thou art mine. William Ralph Featherston* (1846-1873). This Gospel hymn is normally attributed to Featherston (but see below). After that the information is uncertain. It was said by Ira D. Sankey* (1906, pp. 165-6) to have been published without an author's name in The London Hymn Book of 1862. The usually reliable James Mearns* gives 1864 as the date, and the author as anonymous (JJ, p. 1676). Sankey's title probably refers to The London Hymn Book, containing...

Happy the souls to Jesus joined

Happy the souls to Jesus joined. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). From Hymns on the Lord's Supper (1745), where it was found in Section III, 'The Sacrament a Pledge of Heaven'. This section corresponds to Section V of John Wesley*'s abridgement of Daniel Brevint's The Christian Sacrament and Sacrifice (1673) which precedes the hymns, 'Concerning the Sacrament, as it is a Pledge of Future Glory.' In 1745 it was Hymn XCVI, in four stanzas: Happy the Souls to Jesus join'd,   And sav'd by Grace...

Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine

Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine. Fanny Crosby (1820-1915). Written in 1873 to a tune by Phoebe Palmer Knapp*, who played the tune to Crosby and asked 'What does the melody say to you?'. Crosby said that the tune 'said' 'blessed assurance'. It was published in 1873 in the monthly magazine edited by Joseph Fairchild Knapp and Phoebe Palmer Knapp, Guide to Holiness; in the same year it was published in Gems of Praise (Philadelphia, 1873), edited by John R. Sweney*, and in Knapp and Vincent's...

Lord Jesus, in the days of old

Lord Jesus, in the days of old. James Ashcroft Noble* (1844-1896). This was published in Noble's Verses of a Prose Writer (1887), where it was called 'A Hymn for Evening, written for the girls at Wintersdorf' (Noble had lectured on English literature to the girls of Wintersdorf School, Birkdale, Southport). It appeared in the appendix to the revised edition of the school's Wintersdorf Hymnal compiled by Mary S. Simon (1912). It was subsequently included the Wesleyan Methodist School Hymnal...

Wise men, seeking Jesus

Wise men, seeking Jesus. James Thomas East* (1860-1937). This appeared in the Wesleyan Methodist School Hymnal (1911), and in many subsequent Methodist publications, including MHB and HP. It had seven verses. Its charm lies in its simplicity, with a vocabulary well suited to children, and to the metre of 6.5.6.5. The hymn's weakness is its conclusion: He is more than near us,   If we love Him well; For He seeketh ever   In our hearts to dwell. Up to that point it has a considerable...

Alleluia! sing to Jesus

Alleluia! sing to Jesus. William Chatterton Dix* (1837-1898). Written in 1866 and first published in the author's Altar Songs, Verses on the Holy Eucharist (1867), with the title 'Redemption by the Precious Blood'. It was included in the Appendix (1868) to the First Edition of A&M, with the tune ALLELUIA, specifically written for it by Samuel Sebastian Wesley*. It has also been closely associated with HYFRYDOL since being set to that tune in EH (1906); several other tunes are also used....

Jesus, friend of little children

Jesus, friend of little children. Walter John Mathams* (1853-1931). According to Percy Dearmer* (Songs of Praise Discussed, 1933, p. 201) this hymn was written at 24 Chalmers Street, Edinburgh in May 1882 at the request of the committee editing the Baptist Union's Psalms and Hymns for School and Home (1882). In that book it was headed '“I have called you friends”. John xv.15'. It became very popular as a hymn in the children's section of many books. Dearmer noted that it was 'a great favourite...

Jesus es mi rey Soberano

Jesus es mi Rey soberano. Vicente Mendoza* (1875-1955). This is the most widely used original hymn by Mendoza. Fernández comments as follows:  The best known hymn to Hispanics is one written by Dr. Vicente Mendoza. It is said that while he was waiting for a bus on a street corner in Los Angeles on a foggy night the words for 'Jesus es mi Rey Soberano' came to his mind. Even today this hymn is sung in all Hispanic churches throughout the world (Fernández, p. 67).  Translated by Esther...

O King of kings, O Lord of hosts, whose throne is lifted high

O King of kings, O Lord of hosts, whose throne is lifted high. Henry Burton* (1840-1930). This hymn has a complicated history. It is dated 1897 in some books. Burton's  Songs of the Highway (1924), however,  refers to a similar hymn with the identical first line dated ten years earlier, in 1887, with the title 'A Jubilee Ode' and a note: ' (Written for the Queen's Jubilee in 1887, and sung – the music by Sir John Stainer – at the Royal Albert Hall, London.)' The Jubilee of 1887 marked Queen...

Jesus, good above all other

Jesus, good above all other. Percy Dearmer* (1867-1936). Written for EH to fit the tune QUEM PASTORES LAUDAVERE, this has become one of Dearmer's most popular hymns. It was written for children, and it neatly turns the Nativity opening into a general hymn of perseverance, thus making it eminently suitable for a school hymn. It was written in imitation of part of a hymn sometimes attributed to Adam of St Victor* (d. 1146) and translated by John Mason Neale* beginning 'Missa Gabriel de caelis'....

Stand up! Stand up for Jesus

Stand up, stand up for Jesus. George Duffield (1818-1888). This was written in 1858, inspired by the last words of Duffield's friend Dudley A. Tyng (1825-1858). Tyng, a fearless opponent of contemporary evils such as slavery, had preached to a meeting of five thousand people at Philadelphia on 30 March 1858. He then went to help on the family farm, and became entangled with a piece of machinery; his arm had to be amputated, and he died a few days later. On his deathbed he said 'Tell them to...

I have decided to follow Jesus

I have decided to follow Jesus. Simon Kara Marak* (1877–1975). Formerly attributed to Sadhu Sundar Singh (1889-1929). Very few hymnals ascribe an author or composer to this widely sung piece, usually indicating 'Source unknown' or 'Anonymous'. Several hymnals produced during the decade of the 1950s include it, the earliest catalogued in Hymnary.org being Choice Light and Life Songs (Winona Lake, IN, 1950). It has appeared in over fifty collections in North America published since...

Jesus comes with all his grace

Jesus comes with all his grace. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), the volume published with Charles's name only, with his brother's approval and to raise money for Charles's marriage to Sarah Gwynne. It was Hymn XXXIII of 'Hymns for those that wait for Full Redemption'. It had 11 stanzas: Jesus comes with all his Grace, Comes to save a Fallen Race: Object of our Glorious Hope, Jesus comes to lift us up. Let the Living Stones cry out, Let the Sons...

Jesus, my all to Heaven is gone

  Jesus, my all, to Heaven is gone. John Cennick* (1718-1755).  This hymn was printed in Cennick's Sacred Hymns for the Use of Religious Societies,Part II (Bristol, 1743). It was entitled 'Following Christ, the Sinners Way to God'. It had nine stanzas:  Jesus, my All, to Heav'n is gone;He that I plac'd my Hopes upon;His Track I see – and I'll pursueThe narrow Way, 'till Him I view.  The Way the Holy Prophets went,The Road that leads from Banishment,The King's High-Way of HolinessI'll go;...

Jesus soll die Losung sein

Jesus soll die Losung sein. Benjamin Schmolck* (1672-1737). First published in Schmolck's Mara und Manna, oder: Neue Sammlung von Creutz- Trost- Klag- und Freuden-Liedern (Breslau and Liegnitz, 1726). It had nine 6-line stanzas, and was entitled 'Jesus Name zum neuen Jahre' ('Jesu's Name for the New Year, 1725'). It is in EG in the 'Jahreswende' ('turn of the year') section, in five verses (EG 62). The omitted verses were 5 ('Unsers Kaysers Majestät'), 6 ('Jesus Name, Jesus Kraft'), 7 ('Jesus...

All for Jesus, all for Jesus! All my being's ransomed powers

All for Jesus, all for Jesus!/All my being's ransomed powers. Mary Dagworthy James* (1810-1883). This hymn was written at the opening of the year 1871 (James, 1886, p. 199). It was almost certainly published in one of the books that came out of the Wesleyan Holiness movement, of which James was an ardent member, but the exact source of first publication has not been located. It was given a tune by Asa Hull, ALL FOR JESUS. It became more widely known after its inclusion in Redemption Songs...

Gentle Jesus, meek and mild

Gentle Jesus, meek and mild. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742) in fourteen 4-line stanzas. The full original text is printed in Frank Baker's Representative Verse of Charles Wesley (1962), pp. 41-2. Various abridgements of the hymn have been published, with a variety of opening lines; in addition to the original first line, Wesley's stanza 8, 'Lamb of God, I look to thee', and his stanza 13, 'Loving Jesu(s), gentle Lamb', have been chosen as the...

Jesus lives! thy terrors now

Jesus lives! thy terrors now. Christian Fürchtegott Gellert* (1715-1769), translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox* (1812-1897). Gellert's hymn, beginning 'Jesus lebt, mit ihm auch ich'* was published in his Geistliche Oden und Lieder (Leipzig, 1757). Cox's translation appeared in her Sacred Hymns from the German (1841) in six 6-line verses opposite the German text, thus: Jesus lebt, mit ihm auch ich: Tod, wo sind nun deine Schrecken? Er, er lebt und wird auch mich Von den Toden...

Jesus loves me! this I know

Jesus loves me! this I know. Anna Bartlett Warner* (1827-1915). Anna Warner's sister, Susan Bogert Warner*, was a very successful novelist. This famous hymn occurs in one of her books, Say and Seal (1859), to which Anna (also a novelist, though a less successful one) contributed. A motherless boy, Johnny Fax, is ill, and is comforted by his Sunday school teacher as he is dying. The teacher, John Linden, sings this hymn, entitled 'The Love of Jesus'. It was published in The Golden Shower of...

Jesus nimmt die Sünder an

Jesus nimmt die Sünder an. Erdmann Neumeister* (1671-1756). First published in Neumeister's Evangelischer Nachklang (Hamburg, 1718) on the acceptance of sinners (Luke 15: 2) in eight 6-line stanzas. This has been widely used in Germany, and is still in EG in all eight verses (EG 353). There have been several translations into English: the best known is that by Emma Frances Bevan*, 'Sinners Jesus will receive'*. The original text repeats the first line at the end of each stanza, and at the...

Jesus calls the children dear (Jesus loves the little children)

Jesus calls the children dear (Jesus loves the little children). C. Herbert Woolston* (1856–1927).  C. Herbert Woolston's extensive ministry to children as a magician and author led to the composition of this text. Most children connected to Christian churches in the United States between 1930 and 2000 most likely learned the refrain of the original hymn either in Sunday (Church) School, a children's choir, or a domestic setting:  Refrain: Jesus loves the little children,All the children of...

I need Thee, precious Jesus

I need Thee, precious Jesus. Frederick Whitfield* (1829-1904). Published in Whitfield's Sacred Poems and Prose (Dublin, 1859), where it was entitled 'The Need of Jesus'. It was prefaced with '“Unto you who believe He is precious.” 1. Pet. ii. 7'. It may have been one of those hymns that were mentioned in the Preface as having appeared earlier. It had six 8-line verses, each beginning 'I need Thee, precious Jesus', and continuing with (1) 'For I am full of sin', (2) 'For I am very poor', (3)...

Jesus, and shall it ever be

Jesus, and shall it ever be. Joseph Grigg* (ca. 1720-1768), altered by Benjamin Francis* (1734-1799). First published in Grigg's Four Hymns on Divine Subjects, wherein the Patience and Love of our Divine Saviour is displayed (1765). Ira D. Sankey* stated, improbably, that this had been written by Grigg when a child, and that when it was first published it was headed 'Shame of Jesus conquered by love, by a youth of ten years' (Sankey, 1906, p. 129).  According to Taylor (1989), the first verse...

I lay my sins on Jesus

I lay my sins on Jesus. Horatius Bonar* (1808-1889). This was first published in Bonar's Songs for the Wilderness, First Series (Kelso, 1843) (not 'in the Wilderness' as in JJ, p. 556). It was entitled 'The Fulness of Jesus', and preceded by a quotation from Isaiah:  'He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon him, and with his stripes we are healed - Isaiah, liii. 5.' It had four 8-line stanzas.It was later printed in his...

I want Jesus to walk with me.

I want Jesus to walk with me. American Folk Hymn; African American spiritual*.  Traditionally attributed to the African-American spiritual tradition, there is no record of this spiritual in early collections. This results in an undetermined first publication date and has led to some divergent scholarship on its origin. Hymnologist Donald P. Hustad* notes: 'Though the source of this American folk hymn is unknown, it is probably one of the “white spirituals” which thrived for more than two...

O Jesus Christus, wachs' in mir

O Jesus Christus, wachs' in mir. Johann Kaspar Lavater* (1741-1801). From Lavater's Christliche Lieder…Zweytes Hundert (1780), with the date 'Am Neujahrstage 1780'. It was prefaced with the words 'Christus muß wachsen; ich aber muß abnehmen' ('Christ must increase; but I must decrease'), from John 3: 30. It is found in Part II of Lavater's Zweihundert Christliche Lieder (Zürich, 1844), at no. 86 (the book is not indexed). It had ten 4-line stanzas. It is well known in British and American...

When Jesus' friend had ceased to be

When Jesus' friend had ceased to be. Elizabeth Barrett Browning* (1806-1861).  This was 'Hymn III' in the sequence of four hymns printed in Elizabeth Barrett's The Seraphim, and other poems (1838). It was entitled 'The Weeping Saviour'. It is a meditation on human failure and sin, prompted by the story of the raising of Lazarus, and exploring as a preacher might do, the very moving implications of a verse (John 11: 35) that is usually noted only as being the shortest in the Bible: 'Jesus...

Hear thy children, gentle Jesus

Hear thy children, gentle Jesus. Francis Stanfield* (1835-1914).  Stanfield wrote two very similar hymns for children. The first, 'Hear thy children, gentlest Mother'*, addressed to the Blessed Virgin Mary, was published in his Catholic Hymns (1858, 1860). The second, with the first line as above, was in his Holy Family Hymns (1860). Each had four stanzas, in the same metre.  Both were published in the Westminster Hymnal (WH, 1912). The present one addressed to Jesus survived into the Revised...

I heard the voice of Jesus say

I heard the voice of Jesus say. Horatius Bonar* (1808-1889). Written during the author's ministry in Kelso in the Scottish Borders, this hymn was first published in his Hymns, Original and Selected (1846) and subsequently appeared in the first series of his Hymns of Faith and Hope (1857), where it was given the title 'The Voice from Galilee'. It has become easily the most popular of Bonar's many hymns and is found in numerous hymnals of all denominations. The first verse is based on Jesus'...

How sweet the name of Jesus sounds

How sweet the name of Jesus sounds. John Newton* (1725-1807). First published in Olney Hymns (1779) Book I, 'On select Passages of Scripture', with the title 'The name of Jesus' and a reference to the Song of Solomon 1:3, 'Because of the savour of thy good ointments thy name is as ointment poured forth, therefore do the virgins love thee'. The text gives a New Testament reading of the Old Testament imagery, in which the 'sweetness' pervading the poem has rich associations. It is both the...

Jesus! the name high over all

Jesus! the name high over all. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), with the title 'After preaching (in a church)', in twenty-two 4-line stanzas, of which the first was 'Jesu, accept the grateful song'. In John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), the hymn was reduced to six stanzas (9,10,12,13,18 and 22 of the original), beginning with 'Jesus! The Name high over all'. In this form it 'has stamped itself...

Softly and tenderly Jesus is calling

Softly and tenderly Jesus is calling. Will L. Thompson* (1847-1909). First published in one of the publications of the Will L. Thompson Co. in Chicago, Sparkling Gems Nos 1 and 2 Combined (1880), edited by J. Calvin Bushey. It is a powerful and emotional hymn of invitation, with its refrain, 'Come home, come home,/ You who are weary, come home.' Young has described it as 'a typical lullaby in the gospel hymn tradition' in which Jesus is 'waiting, caring, and forgiving in intimate – and for...

Give me Jesus (In the morning when I rise)

  Give me Jesus (In the morning when I rise). African American spiritual*.  The origins of this spiritual appear to be a confluence of the white hymn tradition and the creativity and experiences of enslaved Africans. Numerous first stanzas appear over the decades with the refrain 'Give me Jesus', though the most commonly used initial stanza now begins 'In the morning when I rise'.  The earliest post-Civil War collection, Slave Songs of the United States* (New York, 1867), edited by William...

I can picture Jesus toiling

I can picture Jesus toiling. Dorothy Helen Stone* (dates not known, possibly 1890-1954). This was one of four hymns contributed by Stone to Hosanna: A Book of Praise for Young Children, ed. T. Grigg-Smith, Charles Wood* and H. Middleton (1930). It is the only one that has been widely used: it is found in CP, CH3, in Sunday School Praise (1958), and in WOV. The last-named alters the text to avoid non-inclusive language, such as 'men', and even 'worker' and 'Lord'. Apart from this single...

Jesus, keep me near the cross

Jesus, keep me near the cross. Fanny Crosby* (1820-1915). Written in 1869 to fit a tune by William Howard Doane*, now called NEAR THE CROSS. It has a characteristic Crosby refrain, linking the repetition of 'in the cross' with the promise of a life in heaven: In the cross, in the cross, Be my glory ever; Till my raptured soul shall find Rest beyond the river. The four stanzas were: Jesus, keep me near the Cross:  There a precious fountain,Free to all - a healing stream -  Flows...

Hail, thou once despised Jesus

Hail, thou once despised Jesus. (?) John Bakewell* (1721-1819). This hymn appeared without an author's name in A Collection of Hymns addressed to the Holy, Holy, Holy, triune God, in the Person of Christ Jesus, our Mediator and Advocate (1757). It had two 8-line verses. In 1760 it was enlarged to twice the original length, with the addition of an 8-line verse beginning 'Paschal Lamb by God appointed' and two further quatrains, one beginning There for Sinners thou art pleading 'Spare them...

Jesus, come, for we invite you

Jesus, come, for we invite you. Christopher Martin Idle* (1938- ). Written at the season of Epiphany, 1979, when the author was rector of Limehouse. Based on the account of the first miracle, the changing of water into wine (John 2: 1-11), it can be used for weddings (it appeared in The Wedding Book, 1989) although it is primarily about transforming power. It first appeared in Hymns with the New Lectionary (Nottingham, 1980) and then in HfTC and Praise! (2000). In HFTC it is set to a tune by...

O Jesus, crowned with all renown

O Jesus, crowned with all renown. Edward White Benson* (1829-1896). This hymn for Rogation Day was first published in Heroum Filii: Hymn-Book for the use of Wellington College (1860), with the first line as 'O Thron'd, O Crown'd with all renown'. The hymn is normally dated 1860, though it may have been written earlier, when Benson was teaching at Rugby (he became Headmaster of Wellington in 1858, and the Hymn-Book, with its inspiring title, 'sons of heroes', was one of his first ventures). It...

The cross upon which Jesus died

The cross upon which Jesus died. Ira Forest Stanphill* (1914-1993). Written by Stanphill and his wife Zelma in 1945 for a revival meeting in Kansas City, Missouri and published in Hymntime Harmonies (Fort Worth, Texas, 1946), one of the publications from Stanphill's Hymntime imprint. It was written after Stanphill had asked the congregation of the morning worship service for a song subject, and a member called out 'Room at the cross'. This provided the refrain, by which the hymn is sometimes...

Come kindred, upstand in the valour of Jesus

Come kindred, upstand in the valour of Jesus. Philip T.B. ('Tubby') Clayton* (1885-1972).  Clayton wrote this text for the December 1923 Birthday Thanksgiving Service at All Hallows by the Tower of Toc H, a post-World War I organization founded to extend the sense of community and service experienced by many British soldiers during the Great War at Talbot House. It was published in SofPE (1931):  Come kindred, upstand in the valour of Jesus,And praise him and plight him the troth of true...

Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me

Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me. Mary Duncan* (1814-40). This attractively simple three-stanza hymn was one of those written by Mary Duncan for her own children during the last year of her tragically short life. It was published in Memoir of Mrs W.W. Duncan (Edinburgh, 1841), written by her mother, Mary Lundie, and also in Rhymes for my Children (Edinburgh, 1842), containing Duncan's hymns reprinted from the Memoir. It is filled with the care of a dying mother for her little children: Jesus,...

O Jesus, I have promised

O Jesus, I have promised. John Ernest Bode* (1816-74). Written in 1866 for the Confirmation of Bode's three children, a daughter and two sons. It is said to have originally begun 'O Jesus, we have promised', but this has not been confirmed. It was published in leaflet form by SPCK in 1868, entitled 'Hymn for the newly Confirmed', in the New Appendix to the New and Enlarged Edition of Hymns for Public Worship (1870), and in their Church Hymns (1871). Oddly, it was placed by Church Hymns in the...

Father of Jesus Christ, my Lord

Father of Jesus Christ, my Lord. Charles Wesley (1707-1788). From Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742), where it was entitled 'Romans iv.16, &c.'. In the 1780 Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists it was included by John Wesley* in the section 'For Believers Groaning for Full Redemption', with the omission of stanzas 4, 6, 10-12, and 16-19, to make a hymn of eleven 4-line stanzas. The original hymn of twenty 4-line stanzas is a most interesting exposition of the...

Give me the faith that Jesus had

Give me the faith that Jesus had. William Pearson* (1832-1892). Pearson, who began life as a Methodist before joining William Booth*'s Christian Mission, (renamed the Salvation Army), must have been familiar with Charles Wesley*'s 'Give me the faith which can remove'*. This close imitation of Wesley's hymn was published in The War Cry on 19 April 1884, with the title 'THE FAITH. BY MAJOR PEARSON. TUNE—“Sovereignty,” or any 6 lines, 8's'. It had five stanzas:  Give me the faith that Jesus...

What a friend we have in Jesus

What a friend we have in Jesus. Joseph Medlicott Scriven* (1819-1886). Written in Canada West during the mid-1850s by an Irish immigrant teacher, hymn writer, and Plymouth Brethren leader, Joseph Medlicott Scriven, allegedly for his mother who lived in present-day Northern Ireland. While the hymn circulated in at least three manuscripts, Scriven himself did not choose to include it in his own collections of hymns published during his lifetime. It was published in J.B. Packard's Spirit...

Come with us, O blessed Jesus

Come with us, O blessed Jesus. John Henry Hopkins, Jr.* (1820-1891). First published in the Second Edition, enlarged, of Hopkins's Carols, Hymns, and Songs (New York, 1872). It was entitled 'Retrocessional for Christmas Day'; it provides a fine conclusion to a service on that day. After having been neglected for many years, the first stanza of this hymn was printed in H40, with a tune by Johann Schop*, sometimes called WERDE MUNTER, after the hymn by Johann Rist*, 'Werde munter, mein...

Jesus, these eyes have never seen

Jesus, these eyes have never seen. Ray Palmer* (1808-1887). Written at Albany, New York, in 1858, and first published in The Sabbath Hymn Book: for the Service of Song in the House of the Lord (1858), edited by Lowell Mason*, Edwards Amasa Park and Austin Phelps. In The Poetical Works of Ray Palmer. Complete Edition it is headed 'Unseen, not Unknown. “Whom having not seen, ye love” – 1 Peter 1:8'. According to the Companion to CP (1953) Palmer 'was preparing a sermon which had Christ as its...

Jesus, united by thy grace

Jesus, united by thy grace. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742), where it was Part IV of a hymn that began 'Try us, O God, and search the Ground'. It was entitled 'A Prayer for Persons join'd in Fellowship'. Part I of this hymn was used to make 'Help us to help each other, Lord'*. This hymn began 'Jesu, united by Thy Grace', but the modern 'Jesus' avoids the uncomfortable repetition of 'u', and has been adopted by most books. The hymn in 1742 had...

Jesus, the gift divine I know

Jesus, the gift divine I know.  Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). This is a composite hymn in five stanzas created by John Wesley* in A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists from two texts in Charles Wesley's Short Hymns on Select Passages of the Holy Scriptures (1762).  The first two stanzas (Volume II, p. 244) were on John 4: 10-15: 'Thee let me drink, and thirst no more' is a quotation almost verbatim, from verse 15: 'Sir, give me this water, that I thirst not…'. The...

Jesus, my Saviour, look on me

Jesus, my Saviour, look on me. Charlotte Elliott* (1789-1871). JJ, p. 328, gives this hymn as coming from Elliott's Thoughts in Verse on Sacred Subjects (1869), but it is certainly earlier than this. In the Orthodox Presbyterian Church's Trinity Hymnal (Philadelphia, 1961) it is dated 1848, and the page scans of hymnary.org print it from A Collection of Hymns dated 1859. It had seven stanzas: Jesus, my Saviour, look on me, For I am weary and oppressed; I come to cast myself on Thee ;...

Jesus, my Saviour, full of grace

Jesus, my Saviour, full of grace. Benjamin Ingham* (1712-1772).  This hymn appeared in the Inghamite hymnal, A Collection of Hymns for the Use of Those that seek, and Those that have Redemption in the Blood of Christ (Kendal, 1757), known as the 'Kendal Hymn Book'. It had six stanzas:  Jesus, the Saviour of my soul,  Be Thou my heart's delight;Remain the same to me always,  My joy by day and night.  Hungry and thirsty after Thee,  May I be found each hour; Humble in heart, and happy kept  ...

Jesus, Savior Lord, lo to you I fly ('Saranam, saranam').

Jesus, Savior Lord, lo to you I fly ('Saranam, saranam'). Traditional Pakistani, translated by Daniel Thambyrajah Niles* (1908-1970). Asian hymns are perhaps the most neglected repertoire in Western hymnals. Hymns that are available in Asian musical idioms are rarer. The normative practice in Asian churches is to sing Western classic hymns in translation or use contemporary Christian music. Because of their experience with many Western missionaries who did not encourage composition in Asian...

Jesus, where'er thy people meet

Jesus, where'er thy people meet. William Cowper* (1731-1800). Written in 1769 to celebrate the opening of a room at the Great House, Olney, as a meeting room for the local prayer group, and printed in Book 2 of Olney Hymns (1779). The opening of a place of worship is paradoxically used to make the point that God transcends all boundaries and therefore every place is sacred to the Christian. Transcendence and intimacy are combined in the idea that God who defies all limitation is nonetheless...

Jesus Christus herrscht als König

Jesus Christus herrscht als König. Philipp Friedrich Hiller* (1699-1769). First published in Hiller's Die Reyhe der Vorbilder Jesu Christi (Stuttgart, 1757). Unlike the hymns in Hiller's Geistliches Liederkästlein, this was a long hymn of 26 stanzas, shortened to 11 (1, 2, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 18, 20, 25, 26) in EG, where it is found in the 'Himmelfahrt' ('Ascension') section (EG 123). Its original title was 'Lied von dem grossen Erlöser den 28. Aug. 1755. über Ephes. 1, 21, 22.' It is a hymn of...

Blessed Jesus, here we stand

Blessed Jesus, here we stand. Benjamin Schmolck* (1672-1737), translated by Catherine Winkworth* (1827-1878). Schmolck's hymn, 'Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier, deinem Worte nachzuleben'*, was published in his Heilige Flammen der Himmlisch-gesinnten Seele (Third Edition, 1706) in seven 6-line verses, entitled 'Seasonable Reflections of the sponsors on their way with the child to Baptism'. Winkworth translated six verses for Lyra Germanica II (1858), where it appeared as the first hymn in the...

Jesus, thy Church with longing eyes

Jesus, thy Church with longing eyes. William Hiley Bathurst* (1796-1877).  This was first published in Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Use (1831, 'By W.H. Bathurst, M.A., Rector of Barwick in Elmet'), with the title 'Second Coming of Christ'. It had six 4-line stanzas:  Jesus, Thy Church, with longing eyes,   For Thy expected coming waits; When will the promised light arise,  And glory beam from Zion's gates?  Even now, when tempests round us fall,  And wintry clouds o'ercast the...

Jesus calls us; o'er the tumult

Jesus calls us! O'er the tumult. Cecil Frances Alexander* (1818-1895). Written for St Andrew's Day (30 November) and included in a book published by the SPCK, Hymns for Public Worship (1852), edited by Thomas Vincent Fosbery*. It was published with an inferior and amended text in its successor, the SPCK Church Hymns (1871) and in the Second Edition of A&M (1875). EH returned to Alexander's version, and many 20th-century books followed, although successive editions of A&M have stuck to...

O Heart of Jesus, Heart of God

O Heart of Jesus, Heart of God. Georgiana Fullerton* (1812-1895). Published in Fullerton's The Gold-Digger and other verses (1872), and then in The Parochial Hymn Book (1880). It was included by Albert Edmonds Tozer* in his Catholic Hymns: Original and Translated (1898). It had nine verses. It was in the section entitled 'The Sacred Heart' in the Westminster Hymnal (1912). It is a passionate expression of trust in the mercy of Christ, with a powerful use of adjectives: The poorest, saddest...

Ye who own the faith of Jesus

Ye who own the faith of Jesus.  Vincent Stuckey Stratton Coles* (1845-1929).  From the English Hymnal (1906), in the section 'Saints' Days: St Mary the Virgin', under the initials 'V. S. S. C.'. It had seven stanzas, two of which were asterisked for possible omission. This was probably because of their content, inviting intercessions through the Blessed Virgin Mary, suggesting prayers for the dead. Each stanza of the hymn ended with an 'Ave Maria', 'Hail Mary, full of grace'. This was one of...

Must Jesus bear the cross alone

Must Jesus bear the cross alone. USA, 19th-century.  This hymn, a product of early 19th-century American Adventism, has appeared in 1083 USA collections. Some texts have the first line as 'Must (or 'Shall') Simon bear his cross alone'.  It is found in two text versions and distinct musical settings. It is almost unknown in Britain, apart from a printing in the Song Book of the Salvation Army (1953 edition).  Version 1  The first commentary on a version of the hymn, its musical setting,...

Jesus, Lord, we look to Thee

Jesus, Lord, we look to thee. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). From Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), volume I, in the section 'Hymns for Believers', entitled 'For a Family'. It had six verses, originally beginning 'Jesu, Lord…' (amended here because the hymn is widely known as above). It was included in the 1780 Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists in the section 'For the Society, Praying'. It has remained in Methodist use, with slight alterations, apart from an...

Come, said Jesus' sacred voice

Come, said Jesus' sacred voice. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1742-1825).  From Barbauld's Poems (1792). It was headed 'Come unto me all ye that are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.' (from part of Matthew 11: 28). It had five stanzas:  Come, said Jesus' sacred voice, Come and make my paths your choice: I will guide you to your home; Weary pilgrim, hither come!  Thou who houseless, sole, forlorn, Long hast borne the proud world's scorn, Long hast roamed the barren waste, Weary...

When the Church of Jesus/ Shuts its outer door

When the Church of Jesus/ Shuts its outer door. Fred Pratt Green* (1903-2000). Apart from a school hymn written for Humanby Hall School, Yorkshire, when Pratt Green was chaplain there from 1928 to 1931, this was his first hymn: it can be seen as the beginning of his later career as a hymn writer. It is No 1 in The Hymns and Ballads of Fred Pratt Green, edited by Bernard Braley (1982). He first two lines, as above, are an indication of the three-stanza hymn that follows. It dates from 1968,...

All, yes, all I give to Jesus

All, yes, all I give to Jesus.  Jonathan Burtch Atchinson* (1840-1882). First published in Triumphant Songs No. 2 (Chicago: the Edwin O. Excell Co., 1889), with a tune by Edwin O. Excell* named ESCONDIDO. It was headed 'Dedicated to the “Deaconesses” of America' (Deaconesses were active in several churches and hospitals in the 1880s and 1890s). It had four stanzas: All, yes, all I give to Jesus, It belongs to Him; All my heart I give to Jesus It belongs to Him; Evermore to be His...

Jesus, sun and shield art thou

Jesus, sun and shield art thou. Horatius Bonar* (1808-1889). First published in Bonar's Hymns of Faith and Hope, Second Series (1861). It was entitled 'Jesus the First and Last'. It had five stanzas, beginning Jesus, sun and shield art thou Jesus, bread and wine art thou Jesus, Love and Life art thou Jesus, peace and joy art thou Jesus, song and strength art thou This structure is characteristic of Bonar's technique, which sets up a pattern in stanza 1 and makes variations on it in...

Anywhere with Jesus I can safely go

Anywhere with Jesus I can safely go. Jessie Brown Pounds* (1861-1921). One of Pounds' early hymns, written when she was still Jessie Brown, this was published in Hymns Old and New No 1, edited by Daniel B. Towner* (Chicago/New York, 1887). It had three stanzas: Anywhere with Jesus I can safely go;Anywhere He leads me in this world below;Anywhere without Him dearest joys would fade;Anywhere with Jesus I am not afraid. Anywhere with Jesus I am not alone;Other friends may fail me, He is still...

More about Jesus would I know

More about Jesus would I know. Eliza E. Hewitt* (1851-1920). First published in Glad Hallelujahs (1887) in four stanzas with a refrain:   More about Jesus would I know,More of His grace to others show;More of His saving fullness see,More of His love who died for me. Refrain: More, more about Jesus, More, more about Jesus; More of His saving fullness see, More of His love who died for me. More about Jesus let me learn,More of His holy will discern;Spirit of God, my teacher be,Showing...

Jesus lebt, mit ihm auch ich

Jesus lebt, mit ihm auch ich. Christian Fürchtegott Gellert* (1715-1769). This is the better known of two Easter hymns, 'Osterlieder', in Gellert's Geistliche Oden und Lieder (Leipzig, 1757) (the other is 'Erinnre dich, mein Geist, erfreut'). This one is in six stanzas, each of which ends with 'Diese ist meine Zuversicht' ('This is my confidence'), with a final verse triumphantly addressing God: 'Herr, Herr, meine Zuversicht'. It rapidly became popular and has remained so: all six stanzas are...

Jesus calls us here to meet him

Jesus calls us here to meet him. John Lamberton Bell* (1949- ) and Graham Maule* (1958-2019). From Love from Below (Wild Goose Songs 3) (1989), where the title is 'Jesus calls us'. Its opening line suggests a general call to worship in the manner of William Cowper*'s 'Jesus, where'er thy people meet'*, and the first three stanzas can be used for this purpose. The fourth stanza, beginning 'Jesus calls us to his table', makes its purpose clear. It is a hymn in which the previous three stanzas...

I must tell Jesus all of my trials

I must tell Jesus of all of my trials. Elisha Hoffman* (1839-1929). Written in 1893 after visiting a woman in trouble, to whom Hoffman spoke words of comfort, advising her to 'take all of your sorrows to Jesus'. She replied 'I must tell Jesus', which gave Hoffman the germ of the hymn. It was published in Pentecostal Hymns (Chicago, 1894), one of many gospel hymn publications of that time (Hoffman was one of the editors), and in the Christian Endeavor Hymnal (1894), with his tune, ORWIGSBURG,...

O Lord Jesus, I adore Thee

O Lord Jesus, I adore thee. Jean Mauburn* (ca. 1460-1503), translated by John Macleod Campbell Crum* (1872-1958). From Mauburn's Rosetum exercitiorum spiritualium (1491), Titulus VI, Alphabetum xxiii, where it began 'Eia, Jesu adorande'. It is a post-Communion hymn in six stanzas, four of which (1, 2, 5, 6) were translated by Crum for A Plainsong Hymnbook (1932). These were subsequently used in A&MR: O Lord Jesus, I adore Thee For the bread of worth untold Freely given in Thy...

Sunday school hymns, USA

 Sunday schools were founded in the UK and the USA in the late 18th century to teach reading, and the Bible to children, and others who worked six days a week. The American version of the Sunday school had a significant impact on many aspects of American society, not the least the school's distinctive song, which was an important laboratory for public and church music education, a leading participant in the dynamic growth, visibility and popularity of music during the century of expansion, and...

Jesus bids us shine with a pure clear light

Jesus bids us shine with a pure clear light. Susan Bogert Warner* (1819-1885). This children's hymn, with its quaint last line of each verse, 'You in your small corner, and I in mine', was first published in The Little Corporal (Chicago, 1868). It rapidly became very popular, particularly when sung to the tune by Edwin O. Excell*. It is still found in hymnbooks on both sides of the Atlantic, notably in Ireland in ICH5 (2000). In Britain it is also sung to a tune, LUMETTO ('little light'),...

I've found a friend in Jesus, He's everything to me

I've found a friend in Jesus, He's everything to me. Charles William Fry* (1837-1882). A note found by Fry's widow after his death indicated that this hymn had been written in June 1881 at Lincoln at the house of a friend called Wilkinson. Before Fry's death, however, it had been sung at a holiness convention at the Wesleyan Chapel at City Road, London, on 20 December 1881. It was first published in The War Cry (29 December 1881), and then in Salvation Music Vol 2 (1883). In the USA it was...

Come see the place where Jesus lay

Come see the place where Jesus lay. Thomas Kelly* (1769-1855). First published in Kelly's Hymns on Various Passages of Scripture (Dublin, 1804). It was referenced to 'He is not here: for he is risen, as he said.' – MATT. xxvii.6.' Originally it began more dramatically:  He's gone! See where His body lay, A pris'ner till th' appointed day   Releas'd from prison then: 'Why seek the living with the dead?' Remember what the Saviour said,   That he should rise again. A more decorous form of this...

O Jesus Christ, grow thou in me

O Jesus Christ, grow thou in me. Johann Kaspar Lavater* (1741-1801) translated by Elizabeth Lee Smith* (1817-1898). This is a translation of Lavater's 'O Jesus Christus, wachs' in mir'*, published in his Christliche Lieder… Zweytes Hundert (1780) and in the collection of Lavater's works, Zweihundert Christliche Lieder (Zürich, 1844). Smith's translation was published in the British Messenger (November 1860) and then in Christ in Song (1869), edited by Philip Schaff*. In Schaff's book the...

Uns wird erzählt von Jesus Christ

Uns wird erzählt von Jesus Christ. Kurt Rommel* (1926-2011) Written in 1967, and first sung at a Family Service at Schwenningen am Neckar (Villingen-Schwenningen), where Rommel was pastor. It was published in 111 Kinderlieder zur Bibel. Neue Lieder für Schule, Kirche und Haus, edited by Gerd Watkinson (Freiburg in Breisgau, 1968) with the title 'Weihnachtslied' ('Christmas Song'). Each stanza begins with the same line repeated, 'Uns wird erzählt von Jesus Christ' ('The story of Jesus will be...

I am trusting Thee, Lord Jesus

I am trusting Thee, Lord Jesus. Frances Ridley Havergal* (1836-1879). Written in September 1874 in Switzerland, and printed in leaflet form. It was later published in Havergal's Loyal Responses (1878) with the title 'Trusting Jesus': I am trusting Thee, Lord Jesus,  Trusting only Thee;Trusting Thee for full salvation,  Great and free. I am trusting Thee for pardon;  At Thy feet I bow,For Thy grace and tender mercy,   Trusting now. I am trusting Thee for cleansing  In the crimson flood;Trusting...

Ye neighbours and friends Of Jesus draw near

Ye neighbours and friends Of Jesus draw near.  Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), where it began: Ye Neighbours, and Friends of Jesus, draw near; His Love condescends, By Titles so dear To call, and invite you His Triumph to prove, And freely delight you In Jesus his love. The Shepherd who died His Sheep to redeem, On ev'ry Side are gather'd to Him, The Weary and Burthen'd, The Reprobate Race. And wait to be pardon'd Thro' Jesus his Grace. It was...

God forgave my sin in Jesus' name

God forgave my sin in Jesus' name. Carol Owens* (1931- ). Written for a musical, Come Together (1972) by Carol Owens, and arranged by her husband Jimmy Owens*. Written at the suggestion of Jack Hayford* for his Church of the Way, Los Angeles, the musical was performed in many parts of America with the gospel singer Pat Boone as the lead singer. It had a very successful tour of Britain in 1973. This number is sometimes remembered as 'Freely, freely' from its refrain: Freely, freely you have...

Jesus the Lord said, 'I am the Bread'

Jesus the Lord said, 'I am the Bread'. Urdu hymn, translated by Dermott Monahan* (1906-1957). These words were set to an Urdu melody, YISU NE KAHA, recorded by an ethnomusicologist, Kate Greenfield, and arranged by Francis Westbrook*. The hymn was written to fit this beautiful melody; Westbrook's arrangement was made ca. 1940 for a booklet of hymns for Sunday School anniversaries. Words and music were included in the School Hymn-Book of the Methodist Church (1950) and in the EACC...

O when shall I see Jesus

O when shall I see Jesus. Probably by John Leland* (1754–1841). The earliest known publication of this hymn was in Eleazar Clay, Hymns and Spiritual Songs, selected from Several Approved Authors, Recommended by the Baptist General Committee of Virginia (Richmond, Virginia: John Dixon, 1793). The 1793 book is very rare. The text shown below has been transcribed from the copy in the New York Public Library:  O WHEN shall I see Jesus,  And dwell with him above?To drink the flowing fountains,  Of...

Lord / Dear Jesus, I long to be perfectly whole

Lord / Dear Jesus, I long to be perfectly whole. James L. Nicholson* (ca. 1828–1876).  This hymn is often referred to as 'Whiter than snow'. It first appeared with a tune by Philadelphia piano salesman, choral conductor, and composer William G. Fischer (1835–1912) as one of twelve hymns in a Methodist pamphlet entitled Joyful Songs No. 4 (Philadelphia, 1872). Seven of the selections contained tunes by Fischer (Reynolds, 1976, p. 135). The following year the text only was included in Chapel...

Says Jesus, 'Come and gather round'

Says Jesus, 'Come and gather round'. Leith Fisher* (1941-2009).  Leith Fisher began writing hymns while minister of the Old Parish Church at Falkirk (1979-90). This continued when he was appointed as minister of Wellington Church, Glasgow (1990-2006). During the latter period, he was writing commentaries on the synoptic gospels, based on his preaching, and this work sometimes emerged in the form of hymns. This hymn derives from the incidents recorded in, for example, Matthew 18: 1–5 (Jesus...

We praise you, Lord, for Jesus Christ

  We praise you, Lord, for Jesus Christ. Judith Beatrice O'Neill* (1930- ) This hymn for Baptism was written in 1954 for the College Church, Parkville, Melbourne. It was first printed in Canada in The Hymn Book (1971), and in some American books. It then appeared in WOV, and in MHfT and thus in A&MNS (retained in A&MCP) and other books, including RS and the Irish ICH5 (2000). JRW

Ye faithful souls who Jesus know

Ye faithful souls who Jesus know. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Short Hymns on Select Passages of the Holy Scriptures (1762), Volume II, as two hymns, one of two 8-line stanzas and the other of one 8-line stanza, based on Colossians 3:1-2 and 3-4 respectively. The heading of the first hymn is If ye be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God. Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth. The second...

Dying with Jesus, by death reckoned mine

Dying with Jesus, by death reckoned mine. Daniel Webster Whittle* (1840-1901). This hymn is sometimes known by its refrain, 'Moment by moment I'm kept in His love'. It was written in 1893. In that year an English evangelist, Henry Varley (1835-1912), is said to have told Whittle that 'I do not like the hymn “I need thee every hour” very well, because I need the Lord every moment of the day.' Varley's silly remark (for 'every hour' clearly means 'all the time') led to this hymn. It is normally...

Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power

Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power. Elisha Hoffman* (1839-1929). This gospel hymn is famous for its repeated phrase and its refrain, 'Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?' It was printed in Spiritual Songs, for Gospel Meetings and the Sunday School (Cleveland, Ohio, 1878), compiled by Hoffman and J.H. Tenney. It was included in many editions of Ira D. Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos, and in many other books; in Britain it is found in Redemption Hymnal (1951) and New Redemption...

Jesus is Lord! Creation's voice proclaims it

Jesus is Lord! Creation's voice proclaims it. David Mansell* (1936- ). First published in Sound of Living Waters (1974), edited by Betty Pulkingham* and Jeanne Harper, with a tune written by Mansell himself. The editors of the Companion to HP (1988) point to echoes of Psalm 8 ('When I consider thy heavens… the moon and the stars') in stanza 1 line 4; to a quotation from Mark 10: 45 or Matthew 20: 28 ('to give his life a ransom for many') in stanza 2 line 4; and a general debt to Philippians 2:...

Lord Jesus Christ, you have come to us

Lord Jesus Christ, you have come to us. Patrick Appleford* (1925-2018). Written ca. 1958, when Appleford was a curate at Poplar, East London. It was published in Thirty 20th Century Hymn Tunes (1960), published by the 20th Century Church Light Music Group. It was a parody of a successful pop song of the time, 'Living Doll', sung by Cliff Richard. As such it was designed to appeal to a 'pop song' audience, and it probably surprised many worshippers when it was first heard. It has since become a...

Christ Jesus lay in death's strong bands

Christ Jesus lay in death's strong bands. Martin Luther* ( 1483-1546), translated by Richard Massie* (1800-1887). This translation of Luther's 'Christ lag in Todesbanden'* (itself a translation of 'Victimae Paschali'*) was first published in Massie's Martin Luther's Spiritual Songs (1854). Although not used by British Anglican books, it was widely adopted by nonconformist ones. Originally the hymn had seven stanzas: Christ lay awhile in Death's strong bands,   For our offences given But now...

Jesus, my Lord, how rich thy grace

Jesus, my Lord, how rich thy grace. Philip Doddridge* (1702-1751). This was no. 188 in Doddridge's Hymns founded on Various texts in the Holy Scriptures (1755), entitled 'Relieving Christ in his poor Saints. Matt.xxv.40.' This hymn was rewritten in the 19th century by Edward Osler*, an assistant editor to William John Hall* of Psalms and Hymns adapted to the Services of the Church of England (1836), also known as 'The Mitre Hymn Book'*. Osler's text began, 'Fount of all good, to own Thy love'....

When mothers of Salem, their children brought to Jesus

When mothers of Salem, their children brought to Jesus. William Medlen Hutchings* (1827-1876). Written for a Sunday school anniversary at St Paul's Chapel, Wigan, this hymn had six verses. It was revised in a text of five verses and published in The Juvenile Missionary Magazine (June, 1850). Perhaps with the magazine's purpose in mind, the hymn as published was directed to missionary work ('And soon may the heathen/ Of every tribe and nation/ Fulfil Thy blessed word, and cast/ Their idols all...

O how blest the hour, Lord Jesus

O how blest the hour, Lord Jesus. Karl Johann Philipp Spitta* (1801-1859), translated by Richard Massie* (1800-1887). This is Massie's translation of Spitta's 'O wie freun wir uns der Stunde'*. Spitta's hymn was published in his Psalter und Harfe. Zweite Sammlung (Leipzig, 1843), the second series of his hymns. Massie's translation appeared in his Lyra Domestica: Second Series. Christian Songs and Hymns. Translated from the German of C.J.P. Spitta and other favourite Hymn-Writers (1864). It...

Who can cheer the heart like Jesus (All that thrills my soul is Jesus)

Who can cheer the heart like Jesus (All that thrills my soul is Jesus). Thoro Harris* (1874–1955).  Two gospel songs by Harris employed the same melody and refrain. 'All that thrills my soul is Jesus' is a five-stanza hymn with refrain bearing a 1917 copyright. The first stanza follows:  All that thrills my soul is Jesus, Ev'ry day and ev'ry hour;Jesus and His free salvation,Jesus and His mighty pow'r.  Refrain: All that thrills my soul is Jesus;He is more than life to me; And the fairest...

Jesus, I my cross have taken

Jesus, I my cross have taken. Henry Francis Lyte* (1793-1847). In JJ (p. 599) it is noted that this was first printed in an anthology, Sacred Poetry  (Third Edition, Edinburgh, 1824). It was then chosen by James Montgomery* for inclusion in The Christian Psalmist (Glasgow, 1825). In both cases it was ascribed to 'G'. In Montgomery's book it was in the section entitled 'Scripture Subjects', and headed 'Forsaking all to follow Christ. – Mark x. 28.' This is the verse in which Peter says to our...

Teaching hymnody

  Teaching hymnody: a survey   Human beings are born with the 'propensity to make and listen to music that was encoded into the human genome during the evolutionary history of our species' (Mithen, 2006, p. 1). Mark J. Tramo's (1956-) studies on the nature of brain functioning show 'all of us are born with the capacity to apprehend emotion and meaning in music' (Tramo 2001, pp. 54-56). Research by Barbara S. Kisilevsky, et al., indicates that by the final trimester of pregnancy, fetuses are...

Jesus Christus, unser Heiland, der den Tod überwand

Jesus Christus, unser Heiland, der den Tod überwand. Martin Luther* (1483-1546). This is a simple Leise*, with each of the three 4-line verses ending 'Kyrie eleison', celebrating the Resurrection. It was first published as 'Eyn Lobsang auff dem Osterfest' ('a hymn of praise for Easter') in Eyn Enchiridion oder Handbuchlein (Erfurt, 1524). It is found in EG (EG 102) with a tune by Luther from Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert (Wittenberg, Klug, 1529) also found in Geystliche Lieder...

Praise Him, praise Him! Jesus, our blessed redeemer

Praise Him, praise Him! Jesus, our blessed redeemer. Fanny Crosby* (1820-1915). Written as a tribute to William Batchelder Bradbury* (d. 1868), who had encouraged Crosby to write hymns. It was published in Bright Jewels for the Sunday School (1869), edited by Robert Lowry*, William Howard Doane*, and others, including Chester Allen, who wrote the tune. It had three 8-line stanzas. It was printed with a psalm-like refrain in Ira D. Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos: Praise him, praise him! Tell...

Jesus' hands were kind hands, doing good to all

Jesus' hands were kind hands, doing good to all. Margaret Cropper* (1886-1980). Written ca. 1926, and published in Margaret Cropper's Hymns and Songs for the Church Kindergarten (National Society, Central Council for Religious Education, 1939), and possibly earlier. It is a short, two verse hymn with a strong rhythm, admirably suited to very small children because of its shortness and its simplicity. It was found in The School Hymn Book of the Methodist Church (1948) and in Sunday School...

Jesus, we thus obey

Jesu(s), we thus obey. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns on the Lord's Supper (1745) in four 8-line stanzas, in the section entitled 'As it [the Sacrament] is a Sign and a Means of Grace'. It was not included in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), nor in the 1831 and 1876 supplements to the Collection, but was re-introduced to Methodists in MHB (1933), in five 4-line stanzas, thus omitting twelve lines of the original, and...

Jesus paid it all

See 'I hear the Savior say'*.

Shine, Jesus, shine

See 'Lord, the light of your love is shining'*

Toplady's Psalms and Hymns

Toplady's Psalms and Hymns (1776). One of the major early collections of the Evangelical Revival (cf. Madan*, Conyers*) was A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Worship. Collected (for the most part), and Published, By Augustus Toplady, A.B., Vicar of Broad Hembury. London, 1776. In the preface, Toplady wrote: 'God is the God of Truth, of Holiness, and of Elegance. Whoever, therefore, has the honor to compose, or to compile, any thing that may constitute a part of His...

Dear Jesus! ever at my side

See 'Dear Angel! ever at my side'*.

Turn your eyes upon Jesus

See 'O soul, are you weary and troubled'*

Come, sound his praise abroad

  Come, sound his praise abroad. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748).  This is Watts's Short Metre paraphrase of Psalm 95 in The Psalms of David imitated in the language of the New Testament, and apply'd to the Christian State and Worship (1719). It was entitled 'Psalm XCV. Short Metre. A Psalm before Sermon.' Watts also wrote a CM and an LM version. The customary text in hymnals is one of three or four stanzas, corresponding to verses 1-7 of the Psalm. In 1719 the stanzas were as follows:  Come sound...

Come let us join our cheerful songs

Come let us join our cheerful songs. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This appeared in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures', with the title, 'Christ Jesus the Lamb of God, Worshipped by all the Creation; Rev. 5.11, 12, 13.' It skilfully, and freely, paraphrases these verses from Revelation, but instead of straightforwardly following John's vision, Watts invites us to join the angelic chorus, as they express their single joy in their thousands of voices. Many...

Peculiar Honours

Peculiar Honours (1998). Peculiar Honours was published in 1998 by Stainer & Bell for the Congregational Federation, marking the 250th anniversary of the death of Isaac Watts*. The title is taken from Watts' hymn, 'Jesus shall reign where'er the sun'* ('Peculiar [i.e. special] honours to our king'). The book was designed as a resource to aid reflection on hymns: 'to reflect and encourage the traditions of hymn writing within Congregationalism' (Michael Durber, Preface, p. v). Hymns were...

The Lord Jehovah reigns

The Lord Jehovah reigns. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). First printed in the Second Edition of Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1709), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects', this is the last of four hymns under the heading, 'The Divine Perfections'. It is composed in what Watts called 'Peculiar Metre', a variant of the flowing 6.6.6.6.44.44. metre of the 148th psalm. John Wesley* used it in A Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1738) with the title 'The Greatness and Condescension of God', printed in...

My heart is full of Christ, and longs

My heart is full of Christ, and longs. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in A Collection of Psalms and Hymns, Second Edition, Enlarged (1743), Part the Second, these stanzas were the first four of twenty-one 6-line stanzas, forming a paraphrase of Psalm 45. The full, original text is not readily accessible in print, but can be found online in ECCO (Eighteenth Century Collections Online) or from Duke University. In its four-stanza form, the hymn was included in the 1831 Supplement...

Grace Webster Hinsdale

HINSDALE, Grace Webster (neé Haddock). b. Hanover, New Hampshire, 17 May 1832; d. Brooklyn, New York, 31 August 1902. She was the daughter of Rev. Charles Brickett Haddock, a professor at Dartmouth College and nephew of the American jurist Daniel Webster, and Susan Saunders Haddock (née Lang). She received a private education in the town of her birth and developed a strong religious orientation that affected her future literary work. Hymnist Charles S. Robinson* noted that “This child of the...

Welcome, sweet day of rest

Welcome, sweet day of rest. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748).  First published in Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God'. It was Hymn XIV, entitled 'The Lord's Day; or, Delight in Ordinances':  Welcome sweet Day of Rest, That saw the Lord arise;Welcome to this reviving Brest, And these rejoycing Eyes!  The King himself comes near, And feasts his Saints to Day, Here we may sit, and see him near, And love and praise and...

Thomas Arne

ARNE, Thomas Augustine. b. London, 12 March 1710; d. London, 5 March 1778. Born into a wealthy family of London upholsterers, Arne was brought up a Roman Catholic owing to his mother's allegiance to that faith. Well educated, Arne nevertheless threw off a career in the law in favour of music and, in particular the theatre. With the family nose for business, he was assisted by his father in setting up a theatre company for performances of opera at the Haymarket with John Frederick Lampe*. After...

First of the week and finest day

First of the week and finest day. David Mowbray* (1938- ). Noting the dearth of contemporary hymns about Sunday, 'the Lord's Day', and the changing or vanishing perception of its significance, the author wrote this for HFTC (1982) where it appeared for the first time in print (being accidentally switched at the last moment with 'Sweet is the work, my God, my King'*, it was credited to Isaac Watts* in the first words-only edition). The opening lines reflect Genesis 1:1-5; other references...

Handel Parker

PARKER, Handel. b. Oxenhope, Yorkshire, 29 January 1854; d. Shipley, Yorkshire, 30 January 1928. He came from a musical family in which the children were named after famous composers. Handel was a versatile and precocious musician, who played the flute in the village band at the age of seven, and who was organist at Oxenhope Baptist Church at the age of ten. He became organist of the parish church in 1868. In addition to the flute and organ, he also played the violin and trombone, and conducted...

George Whitefield

WHITEFIELD, George. b. Gloucester, 16 December 1714; d. Newburyport, Massachusetts, 30 September 1770. He was the son of an innkeeper, who died when he was two years old. His mother remarried, unhappily, and the inn was mismanaged by his step-father. Whitefield's childhood cannot have been a settled one, although he was educated at Gloucester Cathedral School and the Crypt School. In 1732 he matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford, as a 'Servitor', performing menial tasks in order to pay for...

And are we yet alive

And are we yet alive. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), volume II, one of a series of 'Hymns for Christian Friends'. It had four 8-line stanzas. In the 1780 Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists, stanza 4 was omitted: Jesus, to Thee we bow, And for thy Coming wait: Give us for Good some Token Now In our imperfect State; Apply the Hallowing Word, Tell Each who looks for Thee, Thou shalt be perfect as thy Lord, Thou...

Now to the Lord a noble song

Now to the Lord a noble song. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This hymn appeared in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God', with the title, 'Glory and Grace in the Person of Christ'. It had six stanzas. Watts here takes up what is for him a common theme: that the revelation of God in Christ far exceeds the revelation of God in nature. It begins as a call to the praise and proclamation of God's 'boundless love', which shines at its...

Edward Harland

HARLAND, Edward. b. Ashbourne, Derbyshire, 1810; d. Colwich, Staffordshire, 8 June 1890. He was educated at Wadham College, Oxford (BA 1831; MA 1833). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1833, priest 1834), and was curate of Newborough, near Peterborough (1833-36) and Sandon, Essex (1836-51). In 1851 he became vicar of Colwich, and chaplain to the Earl of Harrowby. He was admitted Prebendary of Eccleshall in Lichfield Cathedral, 1873. He was the author of Index Sermonum (1858), and a popular Church...

Christ the Lord is risen today

Christ the Lord is risen today. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1739), entitled 'Hymn for Easter-Day', in eleven 4-line stanzas. It was not included in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), the scheme of which precluded seasonal hymns, but six stanzas found their way into the 1831 Supplement to the Collection among the additional hymns. Its use has become and remained widespread since then, though in its...

'Christ the Lord is risen today'

'Christ the Lord is risen today'. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1739), entitled 'Hymn for Easter-Day', in eleven 4-line stanzas. It was not included in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), the scheme of which precluded seasonal hymns, but six stanzas found their way into the 1831 Supplement to the Collection among the additional hymns. Its use has become and remained widespread since then, though in...

Joseph Stennett

STENNETT, Joseph. b. Abingdon, Berkshire, 1663; d. Knaphill, Buckinghamshire, 11 July 1713. He was educated at Wallingford Grammar School. He moved to London in 1685, joining the Seventh Day Baptist Congregation at Pinners' Hall, Broad Street in 1686 and becoming pastor there in 1690. As a Seventh Day Baptist, he was free to preach in other chapels in London on Sundays, and he became widely known and respected as an eminent nonconformist. He married Susanna, daughter of George Guill, a Huguenot...

Alas! and did my Saviour bleed

Alas! and did my Saviour bleed. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects', with the title 'Godly Sorrow arising from the Sufferings of Christ'. It had six stanzas. The original stanza 2 has usually been omitted: Thy body slain, sweet Jesus, thine, And bath'd in its own blood, While all expos'd to wrath divine The glorious Sufferer stood! Some 20th-century hymn books alter 'worm' in stanza 1 line 4 to 'one' (CP, HFTC)....

In thee, great God, with songs of praise

In thee, great God, with songs of praise. Joel Barlow* (1754-1812). Barlow 'corrected and enlarged' Isaac Watts*'s The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament and Applied to the Christian State and Worship (1719) at the request of the General Association of Connecticut (Congregational Church), a work published in 1786 as Psalms carefully suited to the Christian Worship in the United States of America, being Dr. Watts's Imitation of the Psalms of David, as improved by Mr....

Behold the amazing gift of love

Behold the amazing gift of love. Scottish Translations and Paraphrases (1781), based on Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). Isaac Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707) contained a hymn, entitled 'Adoption; 1 John 3.1, &c. Gal. 4.6.' The first four (of six) stanzas were: Behold what wond'rous Grace The Father hath bestow'd On Sinners of a Mortal Race To call them Sons of God! 'Tis no surprizing thing That we should be unknown; The Jewish World knew not their King. God's...

With joy we meditate the grace

With joy we meditate the grace. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This paraphrase of Hebrews 4: 15, 16, with Hebrews 5: 7, and Matthew 12: 20, appeared in the Second Edition of Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1709), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures'. The text is a very free paraphrase of all the verses: indeed it might almost be thought of as an original hymn, inspired by the biblical texts. It was entitled 'Christ's Compassion to the Weak and Tempted.' John Wesley* included it in his first...

William Amps

AMPS, William. b. Cambridge, 18 December 1824; d. Cambridge, 20 May 1910. He became organist of King's College, Cambridge in 1855, succeeding the elderly John Pratt. Matriculating at Peterhouse, he took the degrees of BA (1858) and MA (1862) and undertook the conducting of the Cambridge University Musical Society for some years. He was also organist at Peterhouse and Christ's College. On resigning his organist's post at King's in 1876 he was succeeded by Arthur Henry Mann*; but we know nothing...

Dies ist der Tag, den Gott gemacht

Dies ist der Tag, den Gott gemacht. Christian Fürchtegott Gellert* (1715-1769). First published in Gellert's Geistliche Oden und Lieder (Leipzig,1757), in 11 stanzas, with the title 'Weihnachtslied' ('Christmas hymn'). It is found in EG in the Christmas section, in nine verses (EG 42), omitting verses 5 and 8 of the original: 5. Dein König, Zion, kömmt zu dir. “Ich komm, in Buche steht von mir; Gott, deinen Willen tu ich gern.” Gelobt sei, der da kömmt im Herrn! 8. Gedanke voller...

Joseph Swain

SWAIN, Joseph. b. Birmingham, 1761; d. London, 16 April 1796. His parents died when he was very young, and he was apprenticed to an engraver in Birmingham, completing his training in London, where he had gone to live with his brother. In 1782 he 'came under the conviction of sin' (ODNB) and was baptized in 1783 by John Rippon*. In 1792 he became minister of East Street Baptist Chapel, Walworth, South London: in spite of a split in the congregation between Strict and Particular Baptists and...

Churches of Christ hymnody, Britain and Ireland

Churches of Christ in Great Britain and Ireland came into existence from the mid-1830s as congregations were formed, usually breaking away from Scotch Baptist churches. They were influenced by the ideas of Alexander Campbell (1788-1866), son of an Anti-Burgher Seceder Presbyterian minister in Ireland, Thomas, who emigrated to the USA in 1807. The Campbells became two of the four main leaders of the movement in the USA, from which three distinct 20th-century groups derive: Churches of Christ,...

Joel Barlow

BARLOW, Joel. b. Reading, Connecticut, 24 March 1754; d. Żarnowiec, Poland, 26 December 1812. Poet, diplomat, newspaper publisher, lawyer, French politician, and American revolutionary patriot, Barlow graduated from Yale College (now University) (1778) and continued there for additional study. During this time he published his first work, The Prospect for Peace (1778), an anti-slavery poem. Following service during the Revolutionary War as a chaplain, he established a weekly newspaper in...

I'm not ashamed to own my Lord

I'm not ashamed to own my Lord. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1709), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures', with the title, 'Not Ashamed of the Gospel, 2 Tim. 1,12'. The first three stanzas are a free paraphrase, and stanza 4 may loosely paraphrase 2 Timothy 4. 8: 'Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord the righteous judge shall give me at that day.' There are two distinct versions of this hymn in current use. The first...

Awake, my soul, to sound his praise

Awake, my soul, to sound his praise. Joel Barlow* (1754-1812).  Barlow 'corrected and enlarged' Isaac Watts*'s The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament and Applied to the Christian State and Worship (1719) at the request of the General Association of Connecticut (Congregational Church). His work was published in 1786 as Psalms carefully suited to the Christian Worship in the United States of America, being Dr. Watts's Imitation of the Psalms of David, as improved by...

Plunged in a gulf of deep despair

Plunged in a gulf of deep despair. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). First published in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God', where it was entitled 'Praise to the Redeemer'. It had eight 4-line stanzas. It began: Plung'd in a Gulph of dark Despair   We wretched Sinners lay, Without one chearful Beam of Hope,   Or Spark of glimmering Day. With pitying Eyes the Prince of Grace   Beheld our helpless Grief, He saw, and (O amazing Love)...

Thomas Hornblower Gill

GILL, Thomas Hornblower. b. Birmingham, 10 February 1819; d. Grove Park, Kent, 4 March 1906. He was educated at King Edward's Grammar School, Birmingham. The son of English Presbyterians who had, like many others, become Unitarians, he was unable to sign the Articles of the Church of England (despite having rejected Unitarianism) and so was barred from entry to Oxford University. He educated himself privately and remained throughout his life a student and writer. He greatly admired the hymns of...

How beauteous are their feet

How beauteous are their feet. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), with the heading 'The Blessedness of Gospel-Time: Or, The Revelation of Christ to Jews and Gentiles, Isa. 5. 2,7,8,9,10. Mat. 13. 16,17'. The reference to 'Isa. 5. 2' (in later editions printed as 'v. 2'), was a printer's error: the reference is to Isaiah 52: 7-10. The text is a paraphrase of Isaiah 52: 7-10. It is a poet's paraphrase, as distinct from the more literal paraphrases about which the...

Francis Duckworth

DUCKWORTH, Francis. b. Rimington, Yorkshire, 25 December 1862; d. Colne, Lancashire, 16 August 1941. He was the son of a grocer; after leaving school at the age of 12 Francis worked as an assistant in a tobacconist's shop, before moving to Colne in 1882 to work for his brother Joshua in a printing business. He later became a successful grocer. He was a chapel organist in the Wesleyan Methodist church for over fifty years, first at Stopper Lane chapel, near Rimington, and then at Albert Road...

Salvation! O the joyful sound

Salvation! O the joyful sound. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748) and Walter Shirley* (1725-1786). This began as 'LXXXVIII. Salvation' in Book II, 'Compos'd on Divine Subjects', of Isaac Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707). It had three stanzas: Salvation! O the joyful Sound!   'Tis Music to our Ears; A Sovereign Balm for every Wound,   A Cordial for our Fears. Bury'd in Sorrow and in Sin,   At Hell's dark Door we lay, But we arise by Grace Divine   To see a heavenly Day. Salvation! let the...

Ann and Jane Taylor

TAYLOR, Ann, b. Islington, London, 30 January 1782, d. Nottingham, 20 December 1866, married name Ann Taylor Gilbert; Jane, b. Islington, 23 September 1783, d. Ongar, Essex, 13 April 1824. After Isaac Watts* and Charles Wesley*, Ann and Jane Taylor were the most important of the early hymn writers for children. Their Hymns for Infant Minds was first published in 1810 and was a commercial success in Britain and America (by the 1860s, it had gone into nearly 50 editions in America, and by the...

My dear Redeemer and my Lord

My dear Redeemer and my Lord. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Compos'd on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God', hymn 139, with the title, 'The Example of Christ'. It provides what The Companion to RS (1999) calls 'a necessary corrective to the idea that “following Christ” is a simple matter of being nice to people' (p. 258). Nor is it simply a matter of doing our duty. It is Christ's own life that is to be the Christian's pattern, in which...

Filey Conference and its hymns

Filey Conference and its hymns The Filey Christian Holiday Conference, sometimes called the 'Filey Convention' in imitation of the Keswick one, began in 1955. It was founded by an evangelist, A. Lindsay Glegg (1882-1975), President of the Movement for Worldwide Evangelization, following the Billy Graham 'Greater London Crusade' of 1954. It was held each September for a week at Butlin's holiday camp at Filey from 1955 until 1983, when Butlins closed its Filey camp. It moved to a similar camp at...

The race that long in darkness pin'd

The race that long in darkness pin'd. John Morison* (1750-1798). This paraphrase of Isaiah 9: 2-8 was written for the Scottish Translations and Paraphrases (1781). It has a complicated history, and has appeared in many versions. Morison originally wrote a six-stanza text, reproduced in JJ, p. 1155, containing two blood-curdling stanzas (3 and 4) that do not accord well with the final vision of the coming of the Prince of Peace: For thou our burden hast remov'd , and quell'd th'oppressor's...

Simon Browne

BROWNE, Simon. b. Shepton Mallet, Somerset, 1680; d. Shepton Mallet, 1732. He was educated at Shepton Mallet by the local pastor, John Cumming, and then at a Dissenting Academy at Bridgwater run by John Moore, the pastor there. He entered the Independent ministry and was ordained to a charge at Portsmouth followed by that of the Independent Chapel at Old Jewry, London (1716). He was a voluminous writer, publishing many pamphlets and sermons, including ones that demonstrated the dissenters'...

Ralph E. Hudson

HUDSON, Ralph E. b. Napoleon, Ohio, 9 July 1843; d. Cleveland, Ohio, 14 June 1901. The family moved to Philadelphia when he was a child. During the Civil War he served in the Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was a nurse in Annapolis General Hospital, 1862-63. He was given an honourable discharge in 1864. A good musician, he taught music at Mount Vernon College, Alliance, Ohio, and later became a music publisher there. He was a licensed preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church. He published...

Creating God, your fingers trace

Creating God, your fingers trace. Jeffery Rowthorn* (1934- ). This is a metrical version of Psalm 148, 'Praise the Lord from the heavens; praise him in the heights above.' It was written in 1974 and submitted in 1979 for a competition set by the Hymn Society in the United States and Canada* to find 'New Psalms for Today'. It was printed in The Hymn (April 1979). It has four stanzas, beginning 'Creating God...', 'Sustaining God...', 'Redeeming God...' and 'Indwelling God...'. It was printed in...

O the delights, the heavenly joys

O the delights, the heavenly joys. Isaac Watts* (1674-1848).  This is Hymn 91 from Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God'. It was entitled 'The Glory of Christ in Heaven'. The nine stanzas in 1707 were as follows:  O the Delights, the heavenly Joys, The Glorys of the Place, Where Jesus sheds the brightest Beams Of his O'er-flowing Grace!  Sweet Majesty and awful Love Sit smiling on his Brow, And all the glorious Ranks...

In the Cross of Christ I glory

In the Cross of Christ I glory. John Bowring* (1792-1872). First published in Bowring's Hymns (1825), with the title 'The Cross of Christ', often changed in subsequent books to 'Glorying in the Cross'. It is based, like Watts's* 'When I survey the wondrous cross'*, on Galatians 6: 14, though it differs from Watts's hymn in its emphasis on the sublimity, radiance and peace of the cross. The cross becomes a symbol for the whole process of salvation, which adds joy to human happiness and gives...

Mathias Casimir Sarbiewski

SARBIEWSKI, Mathias Casimir (Maciej Kazimierz). b. near Plonsk, Poland, 24 February 1595; d. 2 April 1640. Sarbiewski entered the tutelage of the Jesuit order at the age of seventeen. After a thorough grounding in rhetoric, philosophy, and the humanities, he journeyed to Rome in 1622, where he was ordained as a priest in 1623. It was perhaps during this time that he first encountered Maffeo Barberini, a man educated by and sympathetic to the Jesuits (Barberini was elected Pope Urban VIII in...

John Hatton

HATTON, John. b. perhaps Warrington, Lancashire, date unknown; d. St Helens, Lancashire, December 1793 (buried 13 December). Little is known of his life. He may have been born at Warrington: he was known at St Helens, where he later lived, as 'John of Warrington'. His address in St Helens was Duke Street. His funeral service was preached at St Helens on 13 December. He is believed to have been the composer of the tune DUKE STREET. Its first recorded appearance is in A Select Collection of...

Philip Armes

ARMES, Philip. b. Norwich, 29 March (Grove), 15 August (ODNB) 1836; d. Durham, 10 February 1908. The son of Philip Armes, schoolmaster and bass singer, he was a chorister first under Dr Zechariah Buck at Norwich Cathedral (1846-48) and then (because his father moved to Rochester Cathedral as a lay clerk) under John Larkin Hopkins (1848-50). Armes was articled under Hopkins and gained experience as an organist at Holy Trinity Church, Milton, Gravesend, during the mid 1850s. In 1857 he moved to...

Maltese hymnody

It was only in the 20th century, and particularly with the reforms of Vatican Council II (1962-65), that congregational hymns in the Maltese language gained a firm footing in Malta's churches. Prior to this, hymns were generally sung in Latin by the clergy as part of the Divine Office. The earliest-recorded, non-secular musical activity on the Maltese Islands was that taking place in the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mdina. Documents show that there was singing of plainchant in 1244, that an...

Josiah Conder

CONDER, Josiah. b. London, 17 September 1789; d. London, 27 December 1855. He was the son of an engraver and bookseller, and was largely self-educated after leaving school at thirteen. He followed his father into the bookselling business, but also became a writer and man of letters: he was the proprietor and editor of the Eclectic Review in 1814; much later (1832) he became the editor of an evangelical nonconformist newspaper, The Patriot. He was a voluminous and energetic writer: his most...

Keswick Convention

The Keswick Convention and its hymns The Keswick Convention, a non-denominational and evangelical annual meeting, was founded in 1875 by an Anglican, Canon T.D. Harford-Battersby, Vicar of St John's, Keswick, in collaboration with a Cumberland Quaker, Robert Wilson. It was a product of the 'Holiness movement' of the period (see 'Holiness hymnody, USA*), inspired in part by a book by William Edwin Boardman (1810-1886) called The Higher Christian Life (1859). After a series of revival meetings,...

Join all the glorious names

Join all the glorious names. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This was the last text in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures'. It makes a fitting conclusion to that book. It shared its title with the preceding text: 'The Offices of Christ, from several Scriptures.' It is one of five hymns at the end of Book I which refer to the titles or offices of Jesus, and is really a re-writing in 66.66.44.44. of the preceding Long Metre version. It had twelve...

Before Jehovah's awful throne

Before Jehovah's awful throne. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748), altered by John Wesley* (1703-1791). Isaac Watts's metrical version of Psalm 100 appeared in three versions during his lifetime (see 'Sing to the Lord with joyful voice'*). John Wesley* took the six-stanza text from The Psalms of David (1719), omitting stanzas 1 and 4. Stanza 2 (the present stanza 1) began: Nations, attend before his throne With solemn fear, with sacred joy: Which Wesley altered to Before Jehovah's awful throne, Ye...

Show pity, Lord, O Lord, forgive

Show pity, Lord, O Lord, forgive. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748).  From The Psalms of David imitated in the language of the New Testament, and apply'd to the Christian State and Worship (1719). It was entitled 'Psalm LI. First Part. Long Metre. A Penitent Pleading for Pardon.' It had six stanzas:  Shew pity, Lord, O Lord forgive, Let a repenting Rebel live: Are not thy Mercies large and free? May not a Sinner trust in Thee?  My Crimes are great, but not surpass The Power and Glory of thy Grace:...

There is a land of pure delight

There is a land of pure delight. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God', with the heading 'A Prospect of Heaven makes Death easy.' It is about Christian hope, although in the final stanza, Watts does not seem to take into account that Moses was not allowed to enter the Promised Land. One is reminded of Emily Dickinson's stanza: It always felt to me — a wrong To that old Moses — done — To let...

This is the day the Lord hath made

This is the day the Lord hath made. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This is the fourth part of a paraphrase, in Common Metre, of Psalm 118, from The Psalms of David (1719). There were two additional texts, both based on verses 22-27 of the Psalm, in Short Metre and Long Metre. This one has the titles, 'Hosanna; the Lord's Day; or, Christ's Resurrection and our Salvation'. It purports to be based on verses 24 –26, although verse 25, with its plea to the Lord to save and to send prosperity, is not...

Awake our souls, away our fears

Awake our souls, away our fears. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This appeared in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1709), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures', with the title, 'The Christian Race, Isa. 40. 28, 29, 30, 31.' It is a free paraphrase of the Old Testament passage, and, unusually for Watts, does not make any direct reference to Christ as the source of strength, apart from its title. John Wesley was one of the first to include this text in a hymnbook, in A Collection of Psalms and Hymns...

How pleased and blest was I

How pleased and blest was I. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This is the second version of Psalm 122 in Watts's The Psalms of David (1719). This version is headed 'The same', meaning that it has the same title as the first, 'Going to Church', which is appropriate for the psalm that begins 'I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the Lord.' Both versions are free renderings, the first in Common Metre. The second, in 668. 668. is far more accomplished: it has remained virtually...

We sang our glad Hosannas

We sang our glad Hosannas. Mary Nelson Keithahn* (1934- ). In recent years Palm Sunday observances have been expanded to include the both the Triumphal Entry of Christ into Jerusalem followed by a transition that points toward the events of Christ's Passion. In five stanzas this hymn, published in 1998, spans the events from Palm Sunday through the resurrection, providing a bridge from the excitement of Palm Sunday to the somber events of Holy Week. It may also be sung effectively on Maundy...

Believers Hymn Book

The Believers Hymn Book, with supplement, for use at Assemblings of the Lord's People, was published in 1959. It is the most recent edition of The Believers Hymn Book of 1884. The title has no apostrophe. See Brethren hymnody, British*. From 1 to 326 the hymns are arranged alphabetically. From 327 to 360 they appear in random order. From 361 ('All hail the power of Jesu's name'*) to 464 ('Ye servants of God, your Master proclaim'*) the hymns are again arranged alphabetically, followed by a...

Carl Gotthelf Gläser

GLÄSER, Carl Gotthelf.  b. Weissenfels, Saxony (now Saxony-Anhalt, Germany), 4 May 1784; d. Barmen, North Rhine-Westphalia, 16 April 1829. He was educated at St Thomas' School, Leipzig, and was also taught music by his father. He became an accomplished violinist and a composer. He taught piano and violin at Barmen. When Lowell Mason* visited Europe in 1832 he was on the lookout for new tunes, and found one by Gläser that he named AZMON. According to Reynolds (1976, p.112) it was published in...

There is a fountain filled with blood

There is a fountain filled with blood. William Cowper* (1731-1800). This hymn was first published in Richard Conyers*'s Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1772); it later achieved world-wide popularity. In Book I of Olney Hymns (1779) it had seven stanzas and was headed 'Praise for the fountain opened', from Zechariah 13:1, 'In that day there shall be a fountain opened to the house of David and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem for sin and for uncleanness.' The imagery of the first stanza depends...

Ye wretched, hungry, starving poor

Ye wretched, hungry, starving poor.  Anne Steele* (1717-1778). From Steele's Poems on subjects chiefly devotional (1760), where it was entitled 'Longing Souls invited to the Gospel-Feast. Luke xiv. 22' The reference is to the parable of the great supper (Luke 14: 16-24). Verse 22 is 'And the servant said, Lord, it is done as thou hast commanded, and yet there is room.' The title of the hymn makes it clear that, like the parable, it is not a hymn on the social situation: it is an extended...

We are a garden walled around

We are a garden walled around. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748) From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, 'Collected from the Scriptures' (Hymn LXXIV). It was entitled 'The Church the Garden of Christ; Sol. Song 4. 12, 14, 15. and 5.1.' It began We are a Garden wall'd around, Chosen and made peculiar Ground; A little Spot inclos'd by Grace Out of the World's wide Wilderness. Like Trees of Myrrh and Spice we stand Planted by God the Father's Hand; And all his Springs in Sion flow, To make the...

Hymn anthem

Hymn anthem is a choral form used by composers in setting hymns, metrical psalms, and religious poetry, using the associated hymn tune or composing original music. While English composers were among the first to write hymn anthems, the form is especially popular in the United States, where it has become a principal type of published sacred choral music. One category of hymn anthem includes works based on both a hymn text and hymn tune. As with concertato hymn settings*, composers of this type...

How bright these glorious spirits shine

How bright these glorious spirits shine. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748), altered by the compilers of the Scottish Translations and Paraphrases (1745 and 1781). The original version of this hymn is from Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, 'Collected from the Scriptures' with the title 'The Same: or, the Martyrs Glorify'd; Rev. 7. 13, &c.', following no. 40: 'The Business and Blessedness of Glorify'd Saints; Rev. 7. 13, 14, 15 &c.' This text was extensively altered by the compilers of...

Christian Hymns

Christian Hymns (1977, 2004). Published in 1977 by the Evangelical Movement of Wales, this collection of 901 texts provided a rich selection of hymns by Isaac Watts* (71 hymns) and almost certainly the fullest representation of Charles Wesley* (93 hymns) outside Methodism. It also retained much classic Victorian hymnody, while introducing contemporary writers such as Alan Clifford, Eluned Harrison* and Vernon Higham* to a wider audience. A revision of the book appeared in 1985 and a full new...

Children's hymnody, British

British Children's Hymnody It became apparent from the very earliest days of hymnody that children needed their own hymns. This overview will show how educational, musical and cultural changes are reflected in the many collections of hymns written specifically for children. The challenge presented to writers of children's hymns has always been how to engage the young mind with thought-provoking material but present it in an attractive and accessible manner. Some of the earliest hymn texts...

Psalmodia Germanica

Psalmodia Germanica (1722). Psalmodia Germanica; or a Specimen of Divine Hymns, Translated from the High Dutch. Together with their Proper Tunes and Thorough Bass was published in London in 1722. It was dedicated to the Princesses Anne, Amalia and Carolina (the first two were the daughters of the future George II, who became king in 1727; Carolina was his wife), and it consisted of 'a Translation of Psalmody, used in the Native Country of your Royal Highnesses'. A Psalmodia Germanica, Part II...

Oliver Brownson

BROWNSON, Oliver. b. Bolton, Connecticut 13 May 1746; d. Smithfield, New York, 20 October 1815.  Brownson was a composer, singing master, and compiler of Select Harmony (Hartford[?], Connecticut, 1783-1791), which includes tunes by several American composers not previously published.  He also compiled a less influential work, A New Collection of Sacred Harmony (Simsbury, Connecticut, 1797).  Brownson's surname at birth was spelled B-r-u-n-s-o-n.  He was a son of Isaac and Abigail Brunson (nda,...

Lord, her watch Thy church is keeping

Lord, her watch Thy church is keeping. Henry Downton* (1818-1885). This stirring hymn for mission was written in 1866 during Downton's time in Geneva, and sung at the annual meeting of the Church Missionary Society in that year. It was published in the Seventh Edition of D.T. Barry's Psalms and Hymns for the Church, School, and Home (1867) and subsequently in Downton's Hymns and Verses, Original and Translated (1873). Too late for the First Edition of A&M, and missed by the 1868 Appendix,...

Mission hymnody, USA

Beginnings The beginnings of American churches' missions can be traced to the efforts of John Eliot (1604-1690) to gather 'Praying Indians' into towns for worship, preaching, language instruction and Bible study; the churches and day schools established by John Sargent (1710-1749) in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and Eleazar Wheelock (1711-1779) in Connecticut; and the organization of the Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge among 'Indians' in North America in Massachusetts (1762). The...

Melodies of Praise

Melodies of Praise (1957, 1985). This the title of the hymnal of the churches known as Assembly of God churches. The denomination dates from 1914, when a group of evangelical and Pentecostal ministers meeting at Hot Springs, Arkansas, formed the 'Assemblies of God (USA)'. It is now part of a world-wide organisation, the World Assemblies of God Fellowship. Its headquarters are in Springfield, Missouri, although each church has its independent governance. Its non-negotiable 'Statement of...

From all that dwell below the skies

From all that dwell below the skies. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This is the second of three paraphrases of the very short Psalm 117, each under the heading, 'Praise to God from all Nations', first printed in The Psalms of David (1719). In each version, Watts slightly developed the theme, to fill out his two stanzas of 4 lines each. The original two-stanza text is given length and force by the introduction of 'Alleluia', twice after line 2 and five times after line 4 of each stanza, to fit the...

Reformed hymnody, USA

Hymnody and Hymnals of the Reformed Church in America. The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is an offshoot of the Dutch Reformed Church, or Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk. It dates itself from the founding of a congregation in New Amsterdam (now New York City) by Jonas Michaelius (1577-1638) in April of 1628. Now with approximately 1,000 congregations in the United States and Canada, the RCA claims the oldest continuous Protestant ministry in North America, as well as the oldest theological...

Come, dearest Lord, descend and dwell

Come, dearest Lord, descend and dwell. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This appeared in the Second Edition of Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1709) with the title 'The love of Christ shed abroad in the heart, Ephesians iii. 16 &c.' Although the words of the title are found in Romans 5: 5, the text is a paraphrase of Ephesians 3: 16-21. It has been called 'a tiny gem of a hymn' (Companion to Rejoice and Sing, 1999, 488). It is difficult to imagine a more succinct summary of scriptural verses in such...

God is the refuge of his saints

God is the refuge of his saints. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From The Psalms of David (1719), Psalm 46, First Part (verses 1-5), with the title, 'The Church's Safety and Triumph among national Desolations'. Though close to the spirit and sense of the psalm, it is a free rendering; though it does not make it obviously Christian, it has the strength and economy of verse achieved by Watts at his best. Methodist books change stanza 5 lines 1-2 from That sacred stream, thine holy word, That all our...

We sing the praise of him who died

We sing the praise of him who died. Thomas Kelly* (1769-1855). First published in Hymns by Thomas Kelly, not before Published (Dublin, 1815). It was headed 'God forbid that I should glory save in the Cross: Galatians 6: 14'. In this text, stanza 5 lines 3-4 were: 'Tis all that sinners want below; 'Tis all that angels know above. Kelly changed these lines in the Sixth Edition of his Hymns on Various Passages of Scripture (Dublin, 1826) to the form that is now used in most books: The...

'Twas on that dark, that doleful night

'Twas on that dark, that doleful night. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book III, 'Prepared for the holy Ordinance of the Lord's Supper' (many authorities give the Second Edition of 1709 as the publication date, but it was printed also in 1707). It was the first hymn in Book III, headed 'The Lord's Supper instituted, I Cor. 11. 23, &c.'. It had seven stanzas: 'Twas on that dark, that doleful Night When Powers of Earth and Hell arose Against the...

Andrew Kippis

KIPPIS, Andrew. b. Nottingham, 28 March 1725; d. London, 8 October 1795. Kippis was educated (1741-46) at the dissenting academy at Northampton run by Philip Doddridge*. He became a minister, holding charges at Boston, Lincolnshire, and Dorking, Surrey, before becoming the minister of Princes Street Chapel, Westminster in 1753. He remained there until his death, and was regarded as 'the leading Presbyterian minister in the metropolis' (JJ, p. 625). He was a voluminous writer, contributing to...

My soul, repeat his praise

My soul, repeat his praise. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). Watts published two metrical versions, in Long Metre and Short Metre, of Psalm 103 in The Psalms of David (1719). The former was in two parts, the latter in three. This is the second part of the SM version. It paraphrases verses 8-18 of the psalm, and was given the heading, 'Abounding Compassion of God; or, Mercy in the Midst of Judgement.' Of the two versions, with their five parts, this second part of the SM version stands out in its...

Southern Harmony

Southern Harmony, and Musical Companion is a fasola tunebook compiled by William Walker*.  In the preface to the first edition, dated September, 1835, Walker, then 26 years old, writes, 'The compiler of this work, having been solicited for several years by his brother teachers, pupils, and other friends, to publish a work of this kind, has consented to yield to their solicitations…  I have composed the parts to a great many good airs, (which I could not find in any publication, nor in...

William Blake

BLAKE, William. b. 28 November 1757; d. 12 August 1827. Born in London, the son of a hosier. He did not go to school ('Thank God, I never was sent to school/ To be flogged into following the style of a fool') but attended a drawing school and in 1772 was apprenticed to James Basire, engraver to the Society of Antiquaries. He became a student at the Royal Academy in 1779. With the help of friends he set up a print shop in Broad Street, London, in 1784, and for the remainder of his life he earned...

Author of faith, eternal Word

Author of faith, eternal Word. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in 1740 as the first six of twenty-two 4-line stanzas, as a pamphlet entitled 'The Life of Faith, exemplified in the Eleventh Chapter of St Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews', and again in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1740). It was published in its present form (with 'holiness' replacing the original 'happiness' in stanza 4 line 4) in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780). It has...

John Patrick

PATRICK, John. b. Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, 1632 (baptized 19 April); d. London, 19 December 1695. He was educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (BA 1651, MA 1654). After the Restoration he was curate of Battersea, London (1662-71), and Preacher to the Charterhouse (1671-95). He owed both of these posts to the patronage of his elder brother Simon (or Symon, 1626-1707), who later became Dean of Peterborough, briefly Bishop of Chichester (1690-91), and then Bishop of Ely. During the stormy...

Federico José Pagura

PAGURA, Federico José. b. Arroyo Secco, Santa Fe, Argentina, 9 February, 1923; d.  Rosario, Santa Fe, 6 June 2016.  Life and Ministry In the second half of the 20th century Federico Pagura was among the most notable leaders of the church in South America and one of the leading authors and translators of congregational hymnody from this continent. Not only was he a pillar of the Evangelical Methodist Church in Argentina; he was also a resilient and compelling voice for human rights (derechos...

Lord of our highest love

Lord of our highest love. Gilbert Young Tickle* (1819-1888).  The earliest printing of this hymn recorded in Hymnary.org. is in The Christian Hymnal (Cincinnati, 1882), published for the Churches of Christ. It was published in the same year in New Christian Hymn and Tune Book (Cincinnati: Fillmore Brothers). In Britain it was almost certainly among the 34 hymns by Tickle in A Collection of Hymns for Churches of Christ (Birmingham, 1888), edited by David King (1819-1894), with Tickle as an...

Barry Michael Rose

ROSE, Barry Michael. b. Chingford, Essex, 24 May 1934. A choir trainer of quite exceptional gifts, Rose was appointed the first organist of the new and as yet unfinished cathedral at Guildford in March 1960. He built up one of the country's finest cathedral choirs there, and had a similarly beneficial effect on the singing at St Paul's Cathedral (1974-84), where he was initially Sub-Organist and subsequently Master of the Choir. After an interlude as Master of the Choirs at the King's School,...

Charles Wesley (II)

WESLEY, Charles (II). b. Bristol, 11 December 1757; d. London, 23 May 1834. He was the son of Charles Wesley*, and older brother of Samuel Wesley (III)*. He was a child prodigy, admired by many of the foremost musicians in London, such as Samuel Arnold*, and advised and taught by many of them. His playing was much admired by King George III, and as a young man he played frequently at Court, being named 'Royal organist' to George III and to the Prince Regent after 1810. However, he was...

Hymnody on social issues

The concern of the Church about the problems of living in society has a long history, reflected in its hymnody. In the Magnificat* (Luke 1:46-55) Mary celebrated God her Saviour, who 'hath put down the mighty from their seats, and hath exalted the humble and meek'; and the concern of the Old Testament prophets for the establishing of a just and fair order of society has been the source of much significant later writing on the subject. A hymn such as Albert Bayly*'s 'What does the Lord...

Begin, my tongue, some heavenly theme

Begin, my tongue, some heavenly theme. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God', in nine stanzas. It was entitled 'The Faithfulness of God in his Promises.' Watts altered stanza 4 in the Second Edition (1709) from the original Engrav'd as in Eternal Brass The mighty Promise lies; Nor can the Powers of Darkness raise [a printer's error for 'rase' = erase] The Records of the...

Hugh Blair

BLAIR, Hugh. b. Edinburgh, 7 April 1718; d. Edinburgh, 27 September 1800. According to James Mearns* (JJ, pp. 144-5), he was educated at the University of Edinburgh from 1730 (when he was twelve years of age), graduating MA in 1739 (Mearns gives his death date as 27 December 1800). He was licensed to preach in October 1741, and became minister of Collessie, Fife, in 1742. He moved as second minister to the Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh, in 1743, and to Lady Yester's Kirk (see William Robertson, d....

Benjamin Keach

KEACH, Benjamin. b. Stoke Hammond, near Leighton Buzzard, Buckinghamshire, 29 February 1640; d. London, 18 July 1704. He was apprenticed to a tailor. His early reading and experience inclined him towards Calvinism and adult baptism, and by 1658 he was preaching and ministering to a Baptist congregation at Winslow, Buckinghamshire. In 1664 he published The Child's Instructor, a book which contained not only the basic educational information (reading, writing, arithmetic) but also material...

Sovereign of worlds! display Thy power

Sovereign of worlds! display Thy power. Bourne Hall Draper* (1775-1843). Samuel Willoughby Duffield has described the origins of this hymn. It was from a poem in seven stanzas beginning 'Ruler of worlds, display Thy power'. This hymn consisted of lines 1-12 and 17-20 of the original poem, slightly altered. The remainder of the poem, lines 13-16 and 21-28, was used for the best known hymn by Draper, 'Ye Christian heralds, go, proclaim'*. Duffield dates its first appearance in a hymnal as being...

Songs of Fellowship, UK

  Songs of Fellowship (SoF) is a long-running collection of hymnals published in the UK by Kingsway. Like the Mission Praise* series, it has no particular denominational affiliation, and volumes from it are used across a broad spectrum of British churches as both principal and supplementary hymnals. The collection is firmly in the Evangelical tradition, which affects the choice of content, editorial approach, and the model of publishing. The publication history and numbering of volumes in the...

Beyond all mortal praise

Beyond all mortal praise. Timothy Dudley-Smith* (1926- ). Written in August 1981. The first line and the metre 66.66.44.44. (the metre of the 148th Psalm in the 'Old Version'*) may seem at first sight to recall 'We give immortal praise'* by Isaac Watts*. But while Watts's hymn is on the Holy Trinity, Dudley-Smith's is based on Daniel 2: 20-23, in which Daniel and his companions desired 'mercies of the God of heaven' that would enable them to interpret Nebuchadnezzar's dream. Daniel's prayer of...

God is a name my soul adores

God is a name my soul adores. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). Published in the first edition of Horae Lyricae (1706), where it had eight stanzas. It was entitled 'The Transcendent Glories of the Deity', a title changed in the Second Edition (1709) to 'The Creator and Creatures'. Stanzas 2 and 6 have normally been omitted in more recent printings: From thy great self thy being springs; Thou art thine own original, Made up of uncreated things, And self-sufficience bears them...

The heavens declare thy glory, Lord

The heavens declare thy glory, Lord. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This is one of three paraphrases of Psalm 19 which appeared in The Psalms of David (1719). The first, in two parts, was in Short Metre. That, and the third in 88.88.88 (described as 'P.M.' or 'Peculiar Metre'), are somewhat closer to the text of the psalm itself. This Long Metre version had the title, 'The Books of Nature and of Scripture compared; or, the Glory and Success of the Gospel.' The first two lines closely paraphrase the...

Baptist hymnody, British

Baptists in England were divided into two main groupings until the end of the 19th century: the General Baptists, who were Arminian in theology, and the Particular Baptists, who were Calvinist. These groupings reflected different historical origins, and different theologies and practices, including attitudes to congregational singing. Most churches of both groups formed the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland (now the Baptist Union of Great Britain — BUGB) in the 19th century, though a...

Hymnal 21 (Sambika 21)

Hymnal 21 (Sambika 21)  The Hymnal 21 (Sambika 21) was published by the United Church of Christ in Japan in February 1997. It was designed to reflect the fresh spirit and diversity of congregational songs for the 21st century.  Predecessors of Sambika 21  The first interdenominational hymnal in the history of Japanese hymnody was published in 1903, marking a new development in Japan. The 1903 edition contained 459 hymns with additional service music, including settings of the Gloria and...

Church Hymnal

Church Hymnal (Cooke and Denton, 1853). This was one of the principal books published in the years before the First Edition of A&M. The full title was The Church Hymnal. A Book of Hymns adapted to the use of The Church of England and Ireland, arranged as they are to be sung in Churches. No editors' names appeared on the title page. No date is given on the title page. The copy in the British Library, presented by John Julian in 1893, bears his inscription 'Known as Cooke & Denton's...

Baptist hymnody, USA

Baptist hymnody, USA 17th and 18th Centuries Baptist beginnings in the American colonies occurred with the establishment of churches at Providence (1639) and Newport (1644), Rhode Island. By the end of the 17th century there were 24 churches, all but one of them located in New England or the middle colonies. These early congregations were principally formed by British immigrants and their song practices generally reflected those of Baptists in the Mother Country (see Baptist hymnody,...

I sing the almighty power of God

I sing the almighty power of God. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). With the title 'Praise for Creation and Providence', this was the second text in Divine Songs Attempted in Easy Language for the Use of Children (1715). It had eight stanzas. Stanza 7 is normally omitted from modern hymnbooks: In Heaven he shines with Beams of Love, With Wrath in Hell beneath: 'Tis on his Earth I stand or move, And 'tis his Air I breath [for 'breathe']. Other books shorten the hymn further by omitting the...

Joy to the world, the Lord is come

Joy to the world, the Lord is come. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From The Psalms of David (1719). It is a paraphrase of Psalm 98, Second Part, verses 4-9, with the title, 'The Messiah's Coming and Kingdom'. It had four stanzas: stanza 3 is often omitted or rewritten: No more let sins and sorrows grow, Nor thorns infest the ground; He comes to make his blessings flow Far as the curse is found. This is rewritten in RS as 'No more let thorns infest the ground,/ or sins and sorrows...

O happy day, that fixed my choice

O happy day, that fixed my choice. Philip Doddridge* (1702-1751). Published posthumously as no. 23 in Hymns Founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures (1755), edited by Job Orton, and no. 29 in Scriptural Hymns (1839), edited by John Doddridge Humphreys. The 1839 edition corrected the 1755 misprint in the biblical reference from 1 Chronicles 15: 15 to the more appropriate 2 Chronicles 15: 15. The original title, 'Rejoicing in our Covenant Engagements to GOD', adequately summarizes the...

Ralph Harrison

HARRISON, Ralph. b. Buxton, Derbyshire, 30 August 1748; d. Manchester, 24 November 1810. He spent part of his childhood at Chinley in Derbyshire. He was educated at the Warrington Academy, where he was taught by Joseph Priestley, among others. After a short period as a minister at Shrewsbury (1769-71) he became co-minister of Cross Street Unitarian Chapel, Manchester, from 1771 until 1809. He also founded a grammar school for boys in Manchester in 1774, and was one of the founders of the...

In our work and in our play

In our work and in our play. William Chatterton Dix* (1837-1898); Whitefield Glanville Wills* (1841-1891); William Charter Piggott* (1872-1943). This hymn exists in several versions. That by Dix was in four stanzas, published in Hymns and Carols for Children (1869), edited by Dix but also containing hymns and carols by Gerard Moultrie* and Richard Frederick Littledale*. It was included in Church Hymns (1871; Church Hymns with Tunes, 1874), and in The Children's Hymn Book (1881), edited by...

Give me the wings of faith to rise

Give me the wings of faith to rise. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs, 2nd edition (1709), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects', with the title, 'The Examples of Christ and the Saints'. The text has echoes of John's vision in Revelation, but it is an example of Watts's own imagination at work: rising to heaven on faith's wings, sharing the lesson he has learned from the saints, acknowledging the praise owed to Christ for providing the way to heaven which 'the long...

'Twas on that night when doomed to know

'Twas on that night when doomed to know. John Morison* (1750-1798). This paraphrase of Matthew 26: 26-29 was no 35 in the Scottish Translations and Paraphrases (1781). It is attributed to Morison on the evidence of the daughter of William Cameron*, who thus marked her copy. According to JJ, p. 1180, it is based on a Latin hymn, 'Nocte quâ Christus rabidis Apellis', by Andreas Ellinger (1526-1582), translated by William Archibald, minister of Unst, Shetland (d. 1785). It has remained as...

Johann Jakob Rambach

RAMBACH, Johann Jakob. b. Halle, 24 February 1693; d. Giessen, 19 April 1735. He was born into a Pietist family; his father was a cabinet-maker. He was at the Latin School in Halle, and studied at the University of Halle, where he was taught by, among others, August Hermann Franke*, Joachim Justus Breithaupt, and Joachim Lange*, after which he went to Jena (1719-23), where his lectures and sermons were well received in spite of a speech impediment which made him sound hoarse. Thanks to his...

Come we that love the Lord

Come we that love the Lord. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This appeared, with ten 4-line stanzas, in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God', with the title 'Heavenly Joy on Earth.' Watts himself made changes for the Second Edition of 1709, which have been retained in most subsequent hymnbooks. The original stanza 8 was: The Men of Grace have found Young glory here below, Young Glory here on earthly Ground From Faith and...

Presbyterian hymnody and hymnals, USA

Presbyterian hymnody and hymnals, USA  The Calvinist settlers who came from Scotland, and the Scots who came by way of Ireland (Scotch-Irish) in the 17th and early 18th centuries were firstly Puritans who leaned toward either the Presbyterian or the Congregational form of church organization. New England Puritans tended more toward the Congregational model, those in Pennsylvania and New York toward the Presbyterian. Doctrinally, however, the differences were not sufficient to keep Presbyterian...

Am I a soldier of the cross

Am I a soldier of the Cross. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748)  This was printed in Watts's Sermons on Various Subjects, Volume III (1729), added to a sermon entitled 'Holy Fortitude, or Remedies against Fear'. The sermon was on 1 Corinthians 16: 13: 'Stand fast in the faith, quit you like men, be strong'. The hymn was never included in editions of Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs. It came into hymnbooks with John Rippon*'s A Selection of Hymns from the best authors, intended to be an Appendix to Dr...

Richard De Courcy

DE COURCY, Richard. b. Ireland, 1743; d. Shrewsbury, 1803. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and then ordained deacon in 1767, becoming curate at Loughrea to a noted evangelical, Walter Shirley*. He was refused ordination to the priesthood by the Archbishop of Dublin on account of his extreme views, and left for England, where he was taken up by the Countess of Huntingdon*, who made him one of her preachers. Her pressure on the Bishop of Lichfield succeeded in allowing his ordination...

English hymnody

Before the Reformation English hymnody is as old as English poetry itself. The first known English poem is the hymn by Caedmon*, the lay helper at Whitby Abbey, dated between ca. 657 and 680. According to Bede* in his Historia Gentis Anglorum Ecclesiastica, Caedmon thought himself unable to sing but was visited by an angel who told him to sing of the Creation, whereupon he composed the hymn in Anglo-Saxon alliterative verse beginning 'Nu sculon hergan | heafonrices Weard' ('Now praise we the...

Wherewith, O God, shall I draw near

Wherewith, O God, shall I draw near. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1740), in thirteen stanzas, headed 'Micah vi. 6, &c.' It was the hymn that concluded Part I of that book. It was included in a shorter form of ten stanzas by John Wesley* in A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), in the section 'For Mourners convinced of Sin'. He conflated stanzas 2 and 3 into one quatrain:                        ...

Oxford Hymn Book

The Oxford Hymn Book was published by the Clarendon Press (the academic part of the Oxford University Press) in 1908. It was the work of two of the delegates of the Clarendon Press, the Dean of Christ Church, Thomas Strong (Dean, 1901-1920), and the Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, William Sanday (Professor, 1895-1919). They co-opted Mary Church, who had edited The Life and Letters of Dean Church (her father, R.W. Church, 1815-1890, Dean of St Paul's, 1871-90) and James Thompson, the Dean...

Glad was my heart to hear

Glad was my heart to hear. James Montgomery* (1771-1854). First published in Montgomery's Songs of Zion (1822) in six 4-line stanzas. It is based on Psalm 122 ('I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the Lord'). It is characteristic of Montgomery in its economy and simplicity, as in stanzas 1-3: Glad was my heart to hear My old companions say:Come, in the house of God appear, For 'tis a holy day. Our willing feet shall stand Within the temple door,While...

Head of the Church, our risen Lord

Head of the church, our risen Lord. Josiah Conder* (1789-1855). First published in The Congregational Hymn Book (1836), edited by Conder for the new Congregational Church as a Supplement to Isaac Watts*'s Psalms and Hymns. It is based on a hymn from the Gelasian Sacramentary, an 8th-century Vatican manuscript in which the Feasts of the Church were arranged according to the ecclesiastical year. The Sacramentary contained the priest's prayers and rubrics for the Eucharist, and the Gelasian...

Henry Lahee

LAHEE, Henry. b. Chelsea, London, 11 April 1826; d. Croydon, Surrey, 29 April 1912. He was a pupil of Sterndale Bennett*, John Goss*, and Cipriani Potter. In 1847 he became organist of Holy Trinity, Brompton, where the vicar was William Josiah Irons*, the translator of the 'Dies irae, dies illa'*. Irons and Lahee collaborated to produce The Metrical Psalter…for singing at each Sunday service throughout the year (1855), with an Appendix (1861) containing 22 hymns. Irons and Lahee also published...

Lord of the boundless curves of space

Lord of the boundless curves of space. Albert Frederick Bayly* (1901-1984). Written in 1949 following a talk on 'Poetry and Science' by J. Isaacs on 'The Third Programme' of the BBC. It was published in Rejoice O People (1950) and in the Rodborough Hymnal (1964). Five of the original seven stanzas appeared in EP (1975) with slight changes. Textual changes ('thy', 'thee' and 'thine' becoming 'your', 'you' and 'yours' respectively) were made for MHfT (1980), and for the author's Rejoice Together...

The Lord of Heaven confess

The Lord of Heaven confess. George Wither* (1588-1667). This paraphrase of Psalm 148 was published in Wither's The Psalmes of David, translated into lyrick-verse (1632). It was included in SofP in an abbreviated version omitting stanzas 2, 4 and 6, while CH3 gives the full text. The SofP version prints a variant of the lines beginning 'Even those that be of Israel's race' which makes it clear that 'even' means 'equally' and is not intended to be derogatory of the Jewish people: Yea, they...

I'll praise my maker while I've breath

I'll praise my maker while I've breath. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This superb metrical version of Psalm 146 appeared in The Psalms of David (1719), with the title 'Praise to God for his Goodness and Truth.' It followed a Long Metre version, with the same title and with some of the same lines. The version beginning as above has been preferred by most books. John Wesley* included it in his Charlestown Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1737). His shortened version, with its altered first line, has...

Gadsby's hymns

Gadsby's Hymns William Gadsby* (1773-1844) is famous for his Selection of Hymns for Public Worship (Manchester, 1814), which he published in the same year as a collection of his own work, The Nazarene's Songs: being a Composition of Original Hymns by William Gadsby (Manchester, 1814). Edition after edition followed, with enlargements and supplements (1838, 1844, 1850, 1854, and thereafter) and it is still in print. These are words-only books: Companion Tunes to Gadsby's hymn book was published...

Yattendon Hymnal

Yattendon Hymnal (1895-99). The Yattendon Hymnal was edited by Robert Bridges* and Harry Ellis Wooldridge*. It was published originally in four separate sections, entitled Hymns in Four Parts [i.e. SATB] with English Words for Singing in Churches: Part I (1895), containing 25 hymns; Part II (1897), hymns 26-50; Part III (1898), 51-75; Part IV (1899), 76-100. It appeared in a complete edition of words and music in 1899 with the YH title. Its name comes from the Berkshire village where Bridges...

Andrew Reed

REED, Andrew. b. London, 27 November 1787; d. London, 25 February 1862. He was the son of a watchmaker, who was also a lay preacher. He became a watchmaker himself, but sold his tools and entered Hackney College in 1807 to train for the Congregational ministry. He was ordained in 1811 to a chapel at New Road, East London. He built a new chapel called Wycliffe in Commercial Road, Whitechapel, and became minister of the congregation there in 1831; he retired in November 1861, after thirty years...

Blest be the everlasting God

Blest be the everlasting God. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, where it had the title, 'Hope of Heaven by the Resurrection of Christ, I Pet. i. 3, 4, 5.' It had five stanzas. Its closeness to the biblical passage is indicated by its inclusion in the 1745 draft of Scottish Translations and Paraphrases, its authorship apparently unacknowledged. When that book was revised and approved in 1781, verse 3, which departs from the New Testament passage, was...

Eternal Power! whose high abode

Eternal Power! whose high abode. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This was the final poem in Book I of Horae Lyricae (1706), 'Sacred to Devotion'. It was headed 'The Conclusion' and given the title, 'The Glories of God exceed all Worship', changed in the Second Edition of 1709 to 'God exalted above all Praise'. Horae Lyricae was expressly designed to encourage weaker Christians not to believe 'that Poetry and Vice are naturally akin… They will venture to sing a dull Hymn or two at Church in Tunes of...

Give to our God immortal praise

Give to our God immortal praise. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This is one of three versions of Psalm 136 in The Psalms of David (1719), one in Common Metre, and the second in the metre of the 'Old 148', the popular metre of 6.6.6.6.44.44. This, in Long Metre, is the only one of the three that has been widely used. It had the title, 'God's Wonders of Creation, Providence, Redemption, and Salvation'. Stanzas 5 and 6 are normally excluded from modern printings. The Jews he freed from Pharaoh's...

In praise of God meet duty and delight

In praise of God meet duty and delight. Erik Routley* (1917-1982). Written in 1976, this is one of only three hymns for which Routley wrote both text and tune (SHERIDAN). It was commissioned by the Westminster Presbyterian Church, Lincoln, Nebraska, and first performed at the dedication of a new organ on 14 November 1976. Stanzas 2 and 3 were reversed and line 3 in stanza 3 was altered to 'voice and mind' rather than 'voice and sound', on that occasion only and in the anthem version (in...

Unitarian-Universalist hymnody, USA

American Unitarians and Universalists participated actively in compiling hymnals and writing hymns throughout the 19th and early 20th century, amassing well over fifty collections before embarking on their first joint venture in Hymns of the Spirit (Boston, 1937). This work pre-dated the actual merger of the American Unitarian Association (AUA) and the Universalist Church of America (UCA) in 1961. Subsequent volumes, described later in this article, appeared in 1964, 1978, 1993, and 2005. Since...

Lord, I have made thy word my choice

Lord, I have made thy word my choice. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This appeared in The Psalms of David (1719), with the title, 'The Word of God is the Saint's satisfying Portion; or, the Excellency and Variety of Scripture.' It is headed 'Psalm 119. Eighth Part'. Watts paraphrased this psalm in eighteen parts, but by no means in verse order. None of the other parts has been included in any recent hymnbook. This purports to paraphrase verse 111 of the psalm: 'Thy testimonies have I taken as an...

Lord of the worlds above

Lord of the worlds above. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This version of Psalm 84 appeared in The Psalms of David (1719), with the title 'Longing for the House of God'. It is the third paraphrase of the psalm, headed 'as the 148th Psalm', referring to the 6.6.6.6. 44.44 metre, the traditional one for Psalm 148. It had seven stanzas, with 'Pause' written between stanzas 4 and 5. In a pre-1831 Supplement to Wesley's 1780 Collection of Hymns the Methodist compilers printed the paraphrase, omitting...

Praise ye the Lord! 'tis good to raise

Praise ye the Lord! 'tis good to raise. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This text is from The Psalms of David (1719), paraphrasing Psalm 147: 1-4, 7-11. It was entitled 'The divine Nature, Providence and Grace'. The second part of the psalm began, with a reference to his own country that was common in Watts's work, 'O Britain, praise thy mighty God.' There was also another version, in Common Metre, of verses 7-18. However, of the three texts 'Praise ye the Lord' is the only one which has continued...

Cotton Mather

MATHER, Cotton.  b. Boston, Massachusetts, 12 February 1663; d. Boston, Massachusetts, 13 February 1728.  Mather, one of the leading Puritan ministers of the American colonies, was instrumental in introducing the hymns of Isaac Watts* to North America. He was born into one of the prominent Puritan families of Colonial America.  His father, Increase Mather (1639-1723), was minister of the prestigious Old North Church in Boston, and president of Harvard College (now Harvard University) from 1692...

John Dobell

DOBELL. John. b. 1757; d. May 1840. Dobell is described in JJ as 'a port-gauger [a person who checked cargoes] under the Board of Excise at Poole, Dorset, and a person of some local note' (p. 304). He published A New Selection of Seven Hundred Evangelical Hymns for Private, Family, and Public Worship (1806). This was evidently successful, for a Third Edition (no date, but before 1825, when it was printed in the USA) was entitled A New Selection of More than Eight Hundred Evangelical Hymns, from...

George Frideric Handel

HANDEL, George Frideric. b. Halle-an-der-Saale, Saxony, 23 February 1685; d. London, 14 April 1759. Handel received his early musical training under Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow, the organist of the Marktkirche in Halle, and since many of Zachow's surviving keyboard compositions are based on German chorale melodies we can assume that this area of hymnody was a fundamental part of Handel's early musical experience. The services at the Marktkirche no doubt involved congregational chorales as well as...

Lord, thou has scourg'd our guilty land

Lord, thou has scourg'd our guilty land. Joel Barlow* (1754-1812).  Barlow 'corrected and enlarged' Isaac Watts*'s The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament and Applied to the Christian State and Worship (1719) at the request of the General Association of Connecticut (Congregational Church), a work published in 1786 as Psalms carefully suited to the Christian Worship in the United States of America, being Dr. Watts's Imitation of the Psalms of David, as improved by Mr....

Methodist hymnody, British

British Methodist Hymnody During the time of John Wesley John Wesley* and Charles Wesley* sang hymns in the Holy Club which Charles had founded at Oxford in 1729, of which John became the acknowledged leader on his return there later in the same year. They would have used traditional English psalm tunes (see Leaver, 1996, p. 31). However, their interest in the potential of hymns as important aids to worship and spirituality developed strongly on the ship that took them to America in 1735-36....

Village Hymns for Social Worship

Village Hymns for Social Worship (1824).  The General Association [Congregational churches] of Connecticut at its June 1820 meeting formed a committee with instructions to 'devise measures for the prosperity of religion within their limits', notably the revivals of The Second Great Awakening (see Great Awakenings, USA*). The committee identified one of the 'measures', as a 'new selection of hymns.' Following two years of committee inaction, committee member Asahel Nettleton*, a noted...

Hymns of the Spirit

Hymns of the Spirit (1864). This was the title of a major anthology edited by the Unitarian ministers Samuel Longfellow* and Samuel Johnson*, published at Boston, Massachusetts, in 1864. It contained 717 hymns, arranged in two principal sections: 1. Worship; 2. God and His Manifestations. The first was divided into: Usual Public Worship Special Occasions. The second was divided as follows: God in Himself; God in Nature; God in the Soul; God in the Life; God in Humanity. The subdivisions of...

William Billings

BILLINGS, William. b. Boston, Massachusetts, 7 October 1746; d. Boston, 26 September 1800. Billings lived his entire life in Boston except for occasional short trips to nearby towns to teach singing schools. He received only a rudimentary formal education, but an inquiring mind led him to read and study widely on his own. His basic musical education came through singing schools (class lessons in reading music and choral singing) common throughout New England during the latter half of the 18th...

When I survey the wondrous cross

When I survey the wondrous cross. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This hymn first appeared in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book III, 'Prepared for the holy Ordinance of the Lord's Supper', with the title 'Crucifixion to the World by the Cross of Christ; Gal. 6.14.' It began: When I survey the wondrous Cross Where the young Prince of Glory dy'd… This was altered by Watts himself for the Second Edition in 1709. In the 20th century, only Baptist books (BHB, 1962; BPW, 1991) retained Watts's...

Albert C. Ronander

  RONANDER, Albert Carl. b. Worcester, Massachusetts, 15 December 1914;  d. Hyannis, Massachusetts, 16 March 2007. A United Church of Christ pastor and hymnologist, Ronander attended Occidental College, Los Angeles, California, and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles (BA, 1938); he undertook further study at Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago Illinois (BD, 1941), Union Theological Seminary, New York City (STM, 1950), with post-graduate studies at Harvard University,...

Breviary

This is the title given to a book containing all the material necessary for performing the Divine Office — prayers, chants, and readings. The readings are usually abbreviated, hence the name. Breviaries first appeared in the 11th century, and contained so much material that they were often divided into summer and winter volumes. For a detailed introduction to the contents of Breviaries see Tolhurst (1942). Breviaries were useful for monks and clerics who were not able to attend the office...

Thoro Harris

HARRIS, Thoro. b. Washington, DC, 31 March 1874; d. Eureka Springs, Arkansas, 27 March 1955. Harris was one of two children born of the union of an unnamed father from North Carolina, thought to have been an African American physician, and Elizabeth W. Harris from Michigan (ca.1840-ca.1900). The 1880 Washington DC census lists the mother as 'white' and 'head of household'. Thoro and his sister Worthy (born South Carolina 1871), are identified 'MU' (mulatto). The Catalog of Howard University,...

David W. Music

MUSIC, David Wayne. b. Ardmore, Oklahoma, 28 January 1949. Music was educated at California Baptist College (BA in music, 1970), and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (MCM 1973, DMA 1977). From 1977 to 1980 he served as a full-time minister of music in Tennessee. At California Baptist College in Riverside (1980-1990) he directed the Chamber Singers, Concert Choir, and College Singers, and was a member of the faculty Baroque ensemble. He taught at Southwestern Baptist Theological...

John Randall

RANDALL, John. b. 26 February 1717; d. Cambridge, 18 March 1799. Randall was a chorister at the Chapel Royal, who was appointed organist of King's College, Cambridge, in 1742 or 1743 (the date is uncertain). He was awarded the degrees of MusB (1744) and MusD (1756). Shortly before the latter date he was appointed Professor of Music in the University of Cambridge (1755). Remarkably, he was at times also organist of Trinity, St John's, and Pembroke Colleges, assisted by his pupil, William Crotch....

Laudate

Laudate (1999, 2012) This is the title ('Praise') of a British Roman Catholic hymnbook, first published in 1999 by Decani Music. It was edited by Stephen Dean*. It was revised in 2012 in accordance with the 2010 translation of the Roman Missal, with a fifth revised printing in 2014. It contains a first section, 'The Liturgy of the Hours', with three sections: Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, and Night Prayer. These contain hymns, psalms, and antiphons by various writers, from John Mason Neale*...

Nature with open volume stands

Nature with open volume stands. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This hymn appeared in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book III, 'Prepared for the holy Ordinance of the Lord's Supper', with the title, 'Christ crucify'd; the Wisdom and Power of God.' That title refers, though it is not stated, to 1 Corinthians 1: 24. Watts uses the argument from the book of nature, the liber naturae, in which all that is made displays God's worthiness. But, as the Companion to Rejoice and Sing (1999) expresses it,...

Timothy Dwight

DWIGHT, Timothy. b. Northampton, Massachusetts, 14 May 1752; d. New Haven, Connecticut, 11 January 1817. Timothy Dwight was the grandson of the preacher Jonathan Edwards. A child prodigy, he began reading the Bible at the age of four, and secretly learned Latin against his father's wishes. He entered Yale College at age thirteen, graduating in 1769. He tutored at Yale until 1777 when he became a chaplain in the Revolutionary Army, and befriended George Washington. After helping his widowed...

Swedish hymnody

Medieval hymns Latin hymns in medieval Sweden have been more thoroughly researched than in other Scandinavian countries. An edition of 129 surviving Swedish melodies, with commentary, together with 60 photographs of medieval Swedish hymn sources may be found in Moberg and Nilsson (1991). The texts were edited in Moberg (1947). Sweden came under the influence of north-west European missionaries in the 11th century, and had contacts with central European Christians in later centuries, both of...

Shape-note hymnody

This is a tradition of rural American sacred music using unorthodox notations, associated with community singing schools and singings. Although the shape-note singing tradition of the 19th century flourished particularly in the South and Midwest, it spread to practically every section of the United States in the closing decades of the 20th century. Shape-note tunebooks contain introductory rudiments for reading the notation plus up to several hundred hymn tunes, fuging tunes*, and anthems. Of...

Benjamin Ingham

INGHAM, Benjamin. b. Ossett, Yorkshire, 11 June 1712; d. Aberford Hall, near Tadcaster, Yorkshire, 2 December 1772. He was educated at Batley Grammar School and Queen's College, Oxford (1730-34), where he became acquainted with Charles Wesley* and was associated with the Oxford Methodists (his diary of these years was edited by Heitzenrater, 1985). He was persuaded by the Wesley brothers to accompany them to Georgia; his letter describing the voyage is printed in Heitzenrater (2003). In Georgia...

George Cooper

COOPER, George. b. London, 7 July 1820; d. London, 2 October 1876. The son of the assistant organist at St Paul's Cathedral, he learned the (pedal) harpsichord and piano and, from time to time, deputised for his father at St Paul's from the age of eleven. Thomas Attwood*, then organist at the cathedral, was most impressed by the boy's gifts and allowed him to extemporise at services. This gift also drew the attention of Mendelssohn*. At the age of thirteen, he became organist at St Benet's,...

Onward, Christian soldiers

Onward, Christian soldiers. Sabine Baring-Gould* (1834-1924). Written in 1864 and published in the Church Times, 15 October 1864, entitled 'Hymn for Procession with Cross and Banners'. It was included in A Supplement to Psalms and Hymns (1867) compiled by T.B. Morrell and William Walsham How*. It appeared in the Appendix (1868) to the first edition of A&M, set to a tune called ST ALBAN arranged by John Bacchus Dykes* from Haydn (it is called HAYDN in EH # 643, where it is printed as the...

Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon

HUNTINGDON, Selina Hastings, Countess of. b. probably Astwell House, Northamptonshire, 13 August 1707; d. Clerkenwell, London, 17 June 1791. She was born Selina Shirley, second daughter of Earl Ferrers: she married Theophilus Hastings, 9th Earl of Huntingdon, in 1728. Dissatisfied with her life as a rich noblewoman, she became involved with the early Methodists from 1739 onwards, entering into correspondence with John Wesley* in 1741, and inviting him to use Donington Park, her Leicestershire...

English Hymnal

English Hymnal (1906; new edition, 1933). The English Hymnal (EH) of 1906 (new edition, 1933) was a remarkable landmark in English hymnody. Its bright green covers, though initially associated with the Anglo-Catholic wing of the Church of England, found their way into places of much broader churchmanship and the book influenced congregational hymn-singing and the contents of other hymn books throughout the 20th century. By the end of the 19th century, the resources for hymn singing in the...

Come, Holy Spirit, heavenly dove

Come, Holy Spirit, heavenly dove. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). First published in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), from Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God'. It was entitled 'Breathing after the Holy Spirit; or, Fervency of Devotion desir'd'. It had five 4-line stanzas: Come, Holy Spirit, Heavenly Dove,   With all thy quickning Powers, Kindle a Flame of sacred Love   In these cold Hearts of ours. Look, how we grovel here below,   And hug these trifling Toys;...

O God, our help in ages past

O God, our help in ages past. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This version of Psalm 90, verses 1-5 is from The Psalms of David (1719), with the title 'Man frail, and God eternal'. It had nine stanzas. It began 'Our God, our help in ages past', an opening line that was altered by John Wesley* in his Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1738) to 'O God…'. This emendation has been accepted by most British hymnbooks apart from those of Congregationalists and Baptists, and some early Presbyterian books...

Sing to the Lord with joyful voice

Sing to the Lord with joyful voice. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This text exists in several books. One version is in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures', with the title 'Praise to the Lord from all Nations; Psalm 100'. Verse 1 was: Sing to the Lord with joyful voice; Let every land his name adore; The British Isles shall send the Noise Across the Ocean to the Shore. A paraphrase of Psalm 100 had originally appeared in Horae Lyricae (1706), with...

Anglican Hymn Book

Anglican Hymn Book (1965) was an attempt to replace the Hymnal Companion to the Book of Common Prayer (Third Edition, 1890) and The Church Hymnal for the Christian Year (1920). It was compiled by a committee appointed by the Church Society, chaired by Canon Herbert Taylor, vicar of Orpington, Kent, and Honorary Canon of Rochester Cathedral. The music editor was Robin Sheldon. It contained 663 hymns, printed in a sans-serif type, unusual in a hymnbook at that time. It is notable for the number...

Conyers's Collection of Psalms and Hymns

CONYERS's Collection of Psalms and Hymns. One of the first hymn books of the Evangelical Revival (cf. Madan*, Toplady*) was Richard Conyers*'s A Collection of Psalms and Hymns, from Various Authors: for the use of Serious and Devout Christians of all Denominations (London, 1767). It contained 274 hymns plus five doxologies. There was no preface, and no compiler's name. The authors most represented were Isaac Watts* and Charles Wesley*, but it also included a hymn by Thomas Olivers* ('The God of...

How few receive with cordial faith. William Robertson, d. 1745*.

How few receive with cordial faith.  William Robertson, d. 1745*. According to James Mearns* in JJ, p. 536, this paraphrase of Isaiah 53 ('Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?') was identified by the daughter of William Cameron* as having been written by William Robertson for the unpublished Translations and Paraphrases of 1745, and amended by John Logan* for the Scottish Translations and Paraphrases in Verse of 1781. Mearns noted that it was 'still in...

I love Thy kingdom, Lord

I love Thy kingdom, Lord. Timothy Dwight* (1752-1817). This is Dwight's metrical version of the 'Third Part' of Psalm 137, in his edition of Isaac Watts*'s The Psalms of David (Hartford, Connecticut, 1801). It had eight 4-line stanzas. It was printed in the American Episcopal Church Hymnal in 1826, and has remained in successive editions. It is 'the earliest American hymn text remaining in common use' (Glover, 1990-1994, volume 3B, p. 979). Most books, including H82, omit stanzas 2-4: 2. I...

James Leach

LEACH, James. b. Townhead, near Rochdale, Lancashire, 1761 (baptized 25 December); d. Blackley, near Manchester, 8 February 1798. He was a handloom weaver by trade, and a Wesleyan Methodist. His talent as a singer and composer soon earned him a great reputation in Lancashire, and like many of his class and region, he was passionately committed to the singing of psalmody, and to more ambitious choral performances at local musical festivals. He is said to have sung as an alto in the Handel...

Lobt Gott in allen Landen

Lobt Gott in allen Landen. Martin Behm* (1557-1622). From Behm's Kirchen Calender (Wittenberg, 1606), with the title 'Gebeet, Vom Brachmonat' ('Brachmonat' was a word for the month of June, now obsolete). It is a delightful hymn for the coming of summer ('Der Winter ist vergangen'), looking forward to the sunshine and the gentle rain that make for a good harvest; it then asks for a spiritual summertime ('die geistlich Sommerzeit', the present verse 3). It had five stanzas, shortened to four in...

My heart and voice I raise

My heart and voice I raise. Benjamin Rhodes* (1743-1815). From Rhodes's poem, Messiah (1787), where it was one of two hymns written in the 6.6.8.6.6.8 metre, and included in the Supplement (1831) to John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), together with 'Jerusalem divine/ When shall I call thee mine?'  In this printing they were separate hymns but consecutive, designated 'P.M.' ('Peculiar Metre'). They were two of four hymns on 'The Kingdom of...

No more, my God, I boast no more

No more, my God, I boast no more. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This appeared in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), with the title 'The Value of Christ and his Righteousness, Phil. iii. 7-9'. The text is a powerful and close interpretation of the passage from the epistle. In Britain it has not been widely used, perhaps because of its apparently stark and uncompromising quality. The Companion to RS (1999) describes it as 'not a hymn for casual use; it addresses the need of the person who has known...

Redemption Songs

Redemption Songs (ca. 1910). This is the title of a volume published in London by Pickering and Inglis (dated by Gordon Bell as ca. 1910). Its sub-title was 'A choice collection of 1000 hymns and choruses for evangelistic meetings, solo singers, choirs, and the home'. It must have been intended as a British rival to Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos, though it was never so successful. It began with 'All hail the power of Jesu's name'*, set to two tunes, MILES LANE and DIADEM. The sections of...

There's a spirit in the air

There's a spirit in the air. Brian Arthur Wren* (1936- ). Written in 1969 for Pentecost when Wren was the minister of Hockley and Hawkwell Congregational Church, and published in the Baptist supplement Praise for Today (1974), without a title; then in Mainly Hymns (Leeds, 1980) with the title 'Praise the Holy Spirit'. It was 'revised 1987-9'. The note in Faith Renewed (1995) describes it as follows: 'at a time when hymnody focused mainly on the Holy Spirit's individual gifts and animating...

William Cameron

CAMERON, William. b. near Ballater, Aberdeenshire, 1751; d. Kirknewton, Midlothian, 17 November 1811. He was educated at Marischal College, Aberdeen, where he was a student and friend of the poet James Beattie. It may have been through Beattie's influence that Cameron became a member of the Committee of the General Assembly charged with producing the Scottish Translations and Paraphrases, which appeared in 1781. In turn, it may have been Cameron who introduced the dubious figure of John Logan*...

Alleluia

The word 'Alleluia' originates from the Hebrew 'Hallel', or praise, followed by 'Yah' or 'Jah' for YHWH, an ascription of monotheistic praise, as in the opening and closing phrases of Psalm 104. The 'Hallel psalms', sung at Passover and other feasts, were Psalms 113 to 118; the 'Great Hallel' was Psalm 136. The word is found in Greek as 'Allelouia' in several verses of Revelation 19. It was used in the early church, and there are records of its being shouted or sung from the third century...

Frederick Bridge

BRIDGE, Sir John Frederick. b. Oldbury, Worcestershire, 5 December 1844; d. London, 18 March 1924. Though born in Worcestershire, his formative years were spent in Rochester where, until 1859, he was a chorister in the cathedral together with his lay-clerk father and his younger brother, Joseph Cox Bridge (who later became organist at Chester Cathedral). Articled to J. L. Hopkins at Rochester, he later accepted the posts of organist at Shorne Parish Church (1861) and Strood Parish Church...

Anne Steele

STEELE, Anne. b. Broughton, Hampshire, 1716; d. Broughton, 11 November 1778. She was the daughter of a timber merchant and Baptist pastor. She was delicate in health as a child, and as a young woman she suffered a tragic loss in 1737 when her fiancé, James Elcombe, was drowned shortly before they were due to be married. Her quiet and apparently uneventful life thereafter gave rise to the idea that she was a suffering soul who turned her resignation into hymns. This has been shown to be a myth...

Greville Phillimore

PHILLIMORE, Greville. b. London, 5 February 1821; d. Ewelme, Oxfordshire,  20 January 1884. He was the son of Joseph Phillimore, Regius Professor of Civil Law, of Shiplake House, Henley-on-Thames. He was educated at Westminster School and then, as 'An Exhibitioner on the Foundation' at the Charter House, before studying at Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1842, MA 1844). He took Holy Orders in 1845, and served curacies at Henley-on-Thames (1846), Shiplake (1847-48), Wargrave and Fawley (1848-49), and...

Translation of hymns

This entry is in two parts: the first by Marcus Wells, the second by JRW Principles of Hymn Translation Hymns have been written for centuries and, through translation, many of them have become known beyond the borders of their country of origin. This has been an increasing trend recently, motivated by ecumenism. It is indeed a great thrill at international gatherings to hear the participants praising God in song, all in their own language: a foretaste of Revelation 7: 9-10. Hymn...

Juan Bautista Cabrera

CABRERA, Juan Bautista Ivars. b. Benissa, Alicante, Spain; 23 April 1837; d. Madrid, 18 May 1916.  A hymn writer, translator of hymns, church historian, and the first bishop of the Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church (1896–1916), Cabrera is known today by Spanish-speaking congregations for his translations of some of the most widely-used historical hymns. He was born into a pious Catholic family in Spain (Catholicism, though the dominant faith tradition in Spain for centuries, became the...

Again the Lord of life and light

Again the Lord of life and light. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1743-1825).  First published in her friend William Enfield*'s Hymns for Public Worship: selected from various authors, and intended as a supplement to Dr Watts's Psalms (Warrington, 1772), where it was entitled 'For Easter-Sunday'. It appeared in Barbauld's Poems (1773), as 'Hymn III', with the same title. It had eleven stanzas.  Many different selections from the eleven stanzas have been made, beginning with William Bengo...

Mercer's 'Cluster'

The Cluster of Spiritual Songs, Divine Hymns, and Sacred Poems ('Mercer's Cluster'). Compiled by Jesse Mercer* (1769-1841). Mercer's Cluster, or 'The Cluster', as it is often called, is a collection of text-only verse compiled by Jesse Mercer. The collection was especially important as a source of texts for William Walker*'s Southern Harmony* and other collections in the development of Shape-note hymnody* and Baptist hymnody in America (see Baptist hymnody, USA*). The first two editions were...

Hast thou not known, hast thou not heard

Hast thou not known, hast thou not heard. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748) and the Compilers of Scottish Translations and Paraphrases (1781). This hymn exists in several forms, by different hands. The original paraphrase of Isaiah 40: 27-31 appeared in Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book I, 'Collected from the Holy Scriptures', with the title, 'Strength from Heaven.' It began Whence do our mournful thoughts arise? And where's our courage fled? Has restless sin and raging hell ...

Alec Wyton

WYTON, Alec (Alexander Francis). b. London, 3 August 1921; d. Danbury, Connecticut, 18 March 2007. After his parents separated, he received his early encouragement from an aunt in Northampton who suggested he learned the piano and organ. When war broke out in 1939, he joined the Royal Corps of Signals but was discharged early owing to a duodenal ulcer. He then went on to the Royal Academy of Music and, in 1943, he became organ scholar at Exeter College, Oxford (BA 1945) where he studied history...

BBC Songs of Praise

BBC Songs of Praise was published in 1997. It traced its origins from two sources: the original Songs of Praise (SofP, 1925, SofPE, 1931), and the popular BBC television programme, 'Songs of Praise', in which congregations from various parts of the British Isles were seen, and individuals were invited to choose hymns. That programme, in the words of the Preface, 'has made churchgoers aware of songs and hymns from beyond their individual traditions, and has been able to popularize newer music on...

Come Father, Son, and Holy Ghost/ Honour the means...

Come, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost/ Honour the means... Charles Wesley* (1707-1788).  This is No. 182 from Volume II of Charles Wesley's Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), the book published under his own name with John Wesley*'s approval. This hymn was headed 'At the Baptism of Adults'. It had six stanzas:  Come, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost  Honour the Means Injoin'd by Thee, Make good our Apostolic Boast  And own thy Glorious Ministry.  We now thy Promis'd Presence claim,  Sent to disciple All...

Plymouth Collection

The Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes; for the Use of Christian Congregations (New York, 1855). The Plymouth Collection was edited by Henry Ward Beecher*, then minister of Plymouth Congregational Church, New York. He delegated responsibility for the tunes to John Zundel* and to his brother, the Revd Charles Beecher (1815-1900). They provided 367 tunes, set to 1374 texts. Each tune was printed with the texts beneath: sometimes, but rarely, with a single text; more often, with several texts...

Robert Lowry

LOWRY, Robert. b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 12 March 1826; d. Plainfield, New Jersey, 25 November 1899. Educated at the University of Lewisburg (later Bucknell University), Lowry was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1854. He was pastor of a church at West Chester, Pennsylvania (1854-58); of Bloomingdale Baptist Church, New York City (1859-61); and Hanson Place Baptist Church, Brooklyn (1861-69). In 1869 he returned to Lewisburg as pastor of the First Baptist Church and professor of rhetoric...

Rock of Ages, cleft for me

Rock of Ages, cleft for me. Augustus Montague Toplady* (1740-1778). A stanza containing lines from this hymn was first published in The Gospel Magazine (October 1775): Rock of Ages, cleft for me, Let me hide myself in Thee! Foul I to the fountain fly: Wash me, Saviour, or I die. The hymn was printed in full in The Gospel Magazine (March 1776), where it was entitled 'A living and dying PRAYER for the HOLIEST BELIEVER in the world'. It was preceded by an essay which is remarkable as an...

Rejoice in the Lord (1985)

Rejoice in the Lord: A Hymnal Companion to the Scriptures (1985) The General Synod of the Reformed Church in America (see Reformed hymnody, USA*) appointed a committee in 1980 to prepare a new hymnal for the denomination. The committee secured the services of Erik Routley*as its editor. Routley's career had involved many components: clergyman, teacher, theologian, author, composer, hymn writer, editorial consultant and member of hymnal committees, and long association with the hymn societies...

Eliza Westbury

WESTBURY, Eliza. b. Hackleton, Northamptonshire, 1808 (Baptized 22 May); d. 11 April 1828. She was a member of Hackleton Baptist Church (among its founders in 1781 had been the local shoemaker, William Carey, who became a famous missionary and was instrumental in establishing the Baptist Missionary Society). Westbury learned to read and write at Sabbath School. She was a lace-maker and a Particular Baptist. Converted to an evangelical faith in 1826, she subsequently wrote about 150 hymns: 71...

John Fawcett

FAWCETT, John. b. Lidget Green, Bradford, West Yorkshire, 6 January 1740; d. 25 July 1817. He was the son of Stephen Fawcett, who died young. Influenced while an apprentice by the preaching of George Whitefield on John 3: 14, he was interested in Methodism but joined the Particular Baptists in Bradford. He entered the ministry, and in May 1764 became minister at the small, damp Wainsgate Baptist Church high in the hills at Old Town above Hebden Bridge, where his remuneration never exceeded £25...

Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber

Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This was published in the Eighth Edition of Watts's Divine Songs Attempted in Easy Language for the Use of Children (1727), with the title 'A Cradle Hymn'. It had 14 stanzas, with the following introduction: Some Copies of the following Hymn having got abroad already into several Hands, the Author has been perswaded at last to permit it to appear in Publick, at the End of these  Divine Songs for Children. This suggests that...

My Shepherd will supply my need

  My Shepherd will supply my need.Isaac Watts* (1674-1748).  Psalm 23 has always been a great comfort in life, and in the face of death (it is often used in funerals). By the time Watts wrote his version, it had attracted several versifiers, from William Whittingham* ('The Lord is only my support') and George Herbert* ('The God of love my shepherd is'*) to Nahum Tate*/Nicholas Brady* ('The Lord himself, the mighty Lord') and Joseph Addison* ('The Lord my pasture shall prepare'*). Watts...

Come, let us anew our journey pursue

Come, let us anew/ Our journey pursue. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns for New Year's Day (1750) in three 8-line stanzas, this hymn has remained in use unaltered, save that since the Supplement of 1831 to A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists it was divided into six stanzas and 'may' was substituted for 'might' in line 18. The hymn draws together a number of biblical images and allusions. The dominant passage is Matthew 25:14-30, the Parable...

High in the heavens, eternal God

High in the heavens, eternal God. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This close yet free paraphrase of Psalm 36, verses 5- 9, appeared in The Psalms of David (1719), entitled 'The Perfections and Providences of God; or, General Providence and Special Grace'. In one of the Supplements to A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780) the compilers excluded Watts's stanza 5, which is found in CP . In 1719 it was: High in the Heavens, Eternal God,  Thy Goodness in full Glory...

We give immortal praise

We give immortal praise. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). This is the 13th of 20 doxologies in Hymns and Spiritual Songs (Second Edition, 1709), Book III, 'Prepared for the holy Ordinance of the Lord's Supper' with the title, 'A Song of Praise to the Blessed Trinity.' It is written in the metre of the 'Old 148th', the popular metre of 6.6.6.6.44.44 used in the 'Old Version'* of the Psalms. It began 'I give…'. The change to 'We' was made by George Whitefield*, and is found in his Psalms and Hymns...

What shall I render to my God (Wesley)

What shall I render to my God (Wesley). Charles Wesley* (1707-1788) This hymn has the same first line as the metrical version by Isaac Watts* of Psalm 116, which is probably why it remained unpublished for many years. It was printed in Volume 8 of George Osborn's The Poetical Works of John and Charles Wesley (1868-72), in which he printed 'Versions and Paraphrases of Select Psalms'. This was headed 'Psalm CXVI'. The lines below were part of a long paraphrase of eleven 8-line stanzas beginning...

When I can read my Title clear

When I can read my Title clear.  Isaac Watts* (1674-1748). From Watts's Hymns and Sacred Poems (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects', hymn 65. It was entitled 'The Hope of Heaven our Support under Trials on Earth'. It had four stanzas. The 1707 text was as follows: When I can read my Title clear   To Mansions in the Skies, I bid farewell to every Fear,   And wipe my weeping eyes. Should Earth against my Soul engage,   And Hellish Darts be hurl'd,, Then I can smile at Satan's rage,  ...

Doxology

Greater Doxology In Luke 2:14, the angels welcomed the birth of Jesus with a hymn, 'Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill towards men'. This was the starting point for one of the oldest Greek hymns, 'Doxa en ipsistis theo'. This morning hymn of praise to the Trinity appears as the last of 14 Odes at the end of the Psalms in the Alexandrine Codex, copied in 5th-century Egypt (London, BL Royal I.D.VII), as well as in various other 5th- and 6th-century sources, mostly...

Summer ended, harvest o'er

Summer ended, harvest o'er. Greville Phillimore* (1821-1884) This harvest hymn was published without an author's name in The Parish Hymn Book (1863, later editions in 1866 and 1875), edited by Phillimore, Hyde Wyndham Beadon*, and James Russell Woodford*. The book was prefaced by a quotation from Isaac Barrow's Sermon on the Duty of Thanksgiving: For every beam of light that delights our eye, for every breath of air that cheers our spirits, for every drop of pleasant liquor that cools our...

William Cowper

COWPER, William. b. Great Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, 15 November 1731; d. East Dereham, Norfolk, 25 April 1800. His name is pronounced 'Cooper'. He was the eldest surviving son of the Revd John Cowper and Ann, née Donne. His mother, who died a few days before his sixth birthday, came from the landed gentry, and members of his father's family had been distinguished lawyers. Following his mother's death William was sent away to school, where he was bullied. He later boarded for about two years...

Owenite rational and social hymns

Social Hymns Robert Owen, the great philanthropist, took over the mills at New Lanark in 1800, and turned them into an institution that combined profitability and humane working practices. Published in what is often referred to as the 'sectarian' phase of the Owenite socialist movement, Social Hymns for the Use of Friends of the Rational System Society is a collection of ideological songs for The Association of All Classes of All Nations. The Association, which was established by Robert Owen...

William Boyce

BOYCE, William. b. London, 1711 (baptized 11 September); d. Kensington, London, 7 February 1779. Encouraged by his father, he entered the choir school of St Paul's Cathedral around 1719 and came under the influence of the cathedral's organist, Maurice Greene, who became a lifelong mentor. After his voice broke, he continued his career as an articled pupil of Greene, and took lessons from Johann Christoph Pepusch. Boyce earned a living as a harpsichord teacher and, in 1734, as organist for the...

Congregational Christian Church and United Church of Christ hymnody, USA

Congregational Christian Church and United Church of Christ hymnody, USA The United Church of Christ (UCC) was formed by a 1957 merger of the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Church, and has a present membership of 1.1 million with 5100 churches in the United States. The diversity of theology among local congregations is great, from liberal to conservative and all points in between, with individual congregations enjoying 'local church autonomy'—a remnant of the...

Isle of Man hymnody

I was agreeably surprised. I have not heard better singing either at Bristol or Lincoln. Many, both men and women, have admirable voices; and they sing with good judgement. Who would have expected this in the Isle of Man? So wrote John Wesley*, in tones of some surprise, on 6 June 1781. His diary entry is one of the very first eye-witness accounts of Manx singing and suggests that there was already established on the Island a firm tradition of a congregational style that would have been...

Samuel Holyoke

HOLYOKE, Samuel. b. Boxford, Massachusetts, 15 October 1762; d. East Concord, New Hampshire, 7 February 1820. Descended from two old, notable New England families, the Holyokes and Peabodys, Samuel Holyoke grew up in an environment of privilege. He attended Harvard College (BA 1789, MA 1792), where he was instrumental in organizing a 'singing society' among the students. His musical training probably came in singing schools (class lessons in musical rudiments and choral singing) common in New...

John Wesley's Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1737)

A Collection of Psalms and Hymns (CPH, 1737) was the first Anglican hymnal published in Colonial America for use in private and public worship (Evans, no. 4207). It was compiled and published in 1737 at Charles-town [now Charleston], South Carolina, by the missionary-priest, John Wesley*, for use in his ministry to English settlers and others who attended his religious societies in Savannah and Frederica, in the Georgia colony.  The Collection is patterned after resources used by Anglican...

Seventh-day Adventist hymnody

Historical Background: the Millerite Roots In the midst of the 19th-century religious revival in the USA known as the Second Great Awakening (see Great Awakenings, USA*), William Miller, a New England farmer whose studies led him to believe that Christ's coming was imminent (1843-1844) began preaching and writing in the 1830s. This preaching, coupled with the organizational skills of Christian Connection minister Joshua V. Himes and other disciples, spurred thousands to study the Bible more...

Te Deum

Before the Reformation The 'Te Deum', or 'Te deum laudamus te dominum confitemur' is one of the most famous of Christian hymns, in use from the 6th century onwards. It was normally sung at matins on Sundays as the hymn before the gospel ('omni Sabbato ad matutinos'). There is a Greek version of the first ten verses (transliterated at JJ, p. 1120). There are several versions. JJ prints three in Latin, in addition to the Greek texts (pp. 1120-1): From the Bangor Antiphonary*, 'Ymnum in die...

A Collection of Spiritual Songs and Hymns

A Collection of Spiritual Songs and Hymns Selected from Various Authors by Richard Allen, African Minister (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1801). This collection, and its Second Edition published the same year with an additional ten hymns, mark the first known compilation by an African American for use in an African American congregation, the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Richard Allen*, founder and pastor of the church, selected the texts that are included in the volume. No authorial...

Charles Haddon Spurgeon

SPURGEON, Charles Haddon. b. Kelvedon, Essex, 19 June 1834; d. Menton, France, 31 January 1892. He was the elder son of a clerk to a coal merchant who was also a Baptist lay preacher and who later became an independent minister. Charles went to school in Colchester and later spent a few months at an agricultural college. He joined the Baptist Church on 3 May 1850 and in spite of his extreme youth almost immediately began his preaching ministry. After short period in teaching, he became a...

Great God of wonders! all thy ways

Great God of wonders! all thy ways. Samuel Davies* (1723-1761). Davies entitled this hymn 'The Glories of God in pardoning Sinners'. It was first published in Hymns adapted to Divine Worship (1769), edited by Thomas Gibbons (1720-1785), the biographer of Isaac Watts*, entitled 'The Pardoning God'. It is based on Micah 7: 18: 'Who is a god like unto thee, that pardoneth iniquity…'. It is a fine example of the hymnody of the USA after the 'Great Awakening', the revivalist movement started in...

Henry Hallam Tweedy

TWEEDY, Henry Hallam. b. Binghampton, New York State, 5 August 1868; d. Brattleboro, Vermont, 11 April 1953. Educated at Binghampton schools, Phillips Andover Academy, and Yale University, Tweedy undertook further study in preparation for the Congregational ministry at the Union Theological Seminary, New York, and the University of Berlin. He was ordained to the ministry at Utica, New York in 1898, serving there and at Bridgeport, Connecticut before being appointed Professor at Yale Divinity...

Henry More

MORE, Henry. b. Grantham, Lincolnshire, 12 October 1614; d. 1 September 1687. He was educated at the Grammar School in Grantham, Eton College, and Christ's College, Cambridge.  He proceeded MA and took Holy Orders in 1639. Elected a fellow of Christ's in 1641, he lived almost entirely within the college except for visits to his 'heroine pupil', Anne, Viscountess Conway, of Ragley Hall, Warwickshire. In 1660 he advocated the use of a set public liturgy bearing the authority of the whole church....

Joanna Southcott

SOUTHCOTT, Joanna. b. Taleford, near Ottery St Mary, Devon, 25 April 1750; d. London, 27 December 1814. She was brought up at Gittisham, near Exeter. As a young woman she worked as a farm labourer, maidservant, and upholsterer. At the age of 42 she began to have visions and to make prophecies of forthcoming events, many of which turned out to be true, such as the resumption of the war with France, crop failures, and the distress of the poor during a time of war and famine. She published the...

Never further than thy cross

Never further than thy cross. Elizabeth Rundle Charles* (1828-1896). Five of the six stanzas of this hymn were included in the New Congregational Hymn Book (1859), and then in a Christian magazine edited by William Arnot, The Family Treasury (February 1860). It continued to appear in Congregational church hymnbooks, and in the 20th century it was in the Anglican Hymn Book (1965). It was reprinted in Charles's Songs Old and New (1894). The six stanzas were: Never further than Thy Cross! ...

Nicolás Martínez

MARTÍNEZ, Nicolás. b. Buenos Aires, Argentina, 7 October 1917; d. 19 August 1972. Born into a Roman Catholic family, he became an evangelical Christian as a young man. He was educated at the Evangelical Faculty of Theology, Buenos Aires, and in Puerto Rico. He was ordained by the Disciples of Christ in 1948, and worked in Argentina and Paraguay. He was one of the editors of Cantico Nuevo, Himnario Evangelico (Buenos Aires, 1962). Martínez is best known for 'Christo vive, fuera el llanto', set...

O thou who camest from above

O thou who camest from above. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Short Hymns on Select Passages of the Holy Scriptures (1762), the fourth hymn in a series of twenty-one on Leviticus, mostly of a single stanza each but including also 'A charge to keep I have'*. It was in two 8-line stanzas, prefaced by the text 'The fire shall ever be burning upon the altar, it shall never go out. — vi.13.' It was turned into four 4-line stanzas by John Wesley* in the 1780 Collection of Hymns for...

Robert Wainwright

WAINWRIGHT, Robert. b. Manchester, 1748 (baptized 17 September); d. Liverpool, 15 July 1782. He was the son of John Wainwright* and older brother of Richard*. He succeeded his father as organist of the Collegiate Church, Manchester (1768-75). He graduated from Magdalen College, Oxford (BMus, DMus, 1774), before moving to St Peter's, Liverpool, where he was organist from 1775 until his death (in both posts he was followed by his brother Richard). He is known for two splendid tunes: MANCHESTER...

Samuel Davies

DAVIES, Samuel. b. New Castle, Delaware, 3 November 1723; d. Princeton, New Jersey, 4 February 1761. Born at the Welsh tract, Pencader Hundred, he was given money for his education by William Robinson, a Presbyterian minister of New Brunswick, and was educated at Fagg's Manor, Pennsylvania, by one of the best teachers in the USA, Samuel Blair. He was licensed as a probationer by the Presbytery of New Castle in 1746, and became a very successful evangelist in Virginia in 1747, later settling in...

Tempo

The brisk tempo generally used in hymn singing today is a relatively modern phenomenon which can be traced to revival movements of the 18th and 19th centuries. Little is known about the tempo of medieval hymns sung by trained choirs, but the Reformed churches of the16th century brought in a new element: an untutored congregation, often without accompaniment. Although the original model was no doubt secular folk song, there is evidence that in the course of the next century the tempo gradually...

The BBC Hymn Book

BBC Hymn Book (1951). Plans for this book were first laid in 1937, but work was suspended on the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. A new small committee was later appointed to complete the work, and its members became the compilers, with Cyril Taylor* playing an important role. The book was intended for the BBC's Daily Service, and for what were then called 'studio services': if regular listeners possessed a copy, they would not have to search elsewhere for the texts and tunes used in...

To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love

To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love. William Blake* (1757-1827). First published in Songs of Innocence (1789) as 'The Divine Image', an engraved poem with a flame running from earth to heaven. Its opposite is 'The Human Abstract' in 'Songs of Experience', in which the human brain is chained to the ground. In the present poem the divine qualities are found in human form, as the 'divine image' is found in the human qualities of mercy, pity, peace and love. This has affinities with Swedenborgian...

Thomas Walker

WALKER, Thomas.  b. 1764; d. 5 July 1827.  An alto singer, teacher, and composer active in London, he began to play an important part in Baptist hymnody as musical adviser to John Rippon*, minister of the prominent Baptist church at Carter Lane in the City of London.   From about 1793 he was Rippon's chief musical adviser, and appears to have been the musical editor of successive editions of Rippon's Selection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes from about 1792 to 1825. According to Manley, this tunebook...

The Lord of Sabbath let us praise

The Lord of Sabbath let us praise. Samuel Wesley (II)* (1691-1739). Published in Samuel Wesley's Poems on Several Occasions (1736), in four stanzas, entitled 'An Hymn for Sunday': The Lord of Sabbath let us praise,   In Consort with the Blest; Who, joyful in harmonious Lays,   Employ an endless Rest. Thus, Lord, while we remember Thee,   We blest and pious grow; By Hymns of Praise we learn to be   Triumphant here below. On this glad Day a brighter Scene   Of Glory was display'd, By God...

Bernard Manning

MANNING, Bernard Lord. b. Caistor, Lincolnshire, 31 December 1892; d. Cambridge, 8 December 1941. The 'Lord' in Manning's name was a given name at his Baptism, not a peerage. He was the son of a Wesleyan Methodist, George Manning, who later became a Congregational minister. His son also became a member of the Congregational Church. Manning was educated at Caistor Grammar School and Jesus College, Cambridge. He became a bye-Fellow at Magdalene College (1916-1918) and was elected a Fellow of...

Bay Psalm Book

The Bay Psalm Book (BPB), or—to use its actual title—The Whole Booke of Psalmes Faithfully Translated into English Metre ([Boston], 1640), is one of the most famous books ever printed in what is now the United States. Its press run was only 1700 copies. The dozen or so that still survive are almost beyond price today. Their value rests chiefly on the BPB's standing as the first book written and printed in English-speaking North America, and as a symbol of the country's beginnings. Much research...

New Version

A New Version of the Psalms of David, Fitted to the Tunes Used in Churches, by Nahum Tate* and Nicholas Brady* (1696) was a response to mounting criticism of Sternhold* and Hopkins*'s psalm paraphrases of 1562. It made slow headway against the Old Version*, but eventually gained an acknowledged place as an alternative psalm book for Anglican use. From about 1770 to 1830 it was probably the most widely used word book in the church, being frequently bound at the back of the Book of Common Prayer....

USA hymnody, music

Psalmody in the 17th and 18th Centuries The early settlers of the British North American colonies—including the Anglicans of Jamestown, the Pilgrims and Puritans of Plymouth and the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the French and Dutch of New Amsterdam—generally relied upon Genevan and/or English psalm tunes for the musical settings of their congregational singing. These tunes were mostly sung from memory, aided by the lining-out process (see Scottish Psalter* and Lining out* for a description of...

Unitarian hymnody, British

The group of British churches which collectively came to be known as Unitarian have been characterized by significant and continuous developments in their theological positions, moving from an broadly Arian position at the beginning of the 18th century to a clear Unitarian Christian position by the end of the 19th. Since the beginning of the 20th century some ministers and congregations who have adopted a more Universalist (and not necessarily Theistic) theology have even begun to challenge...

Richard Meux Benson

BENSON, Richard Meux. b. London, 6 July 1824; d. Oxford, 14 January 1915. He was educated privately, and at Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1847, MA 1849). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1848, priest 1849), serving his curacy at St Mark's, Surbiton (1848-50). He was vicar of Cowley, Oxford (1850-70), and vicar of St John's, Cowley, Oxford (1870-1886). He was the Founder and First Superior of the Community of St John the Evangelist, Cowley (SSJE, or the 'Cowley Fathers', a community that flourished...

Robert Wesley Littlewood

LITTLEWOOD, Robert Wesley. b. Belfast, Northern Ireland, 28 August 1908; d. Bangor, County Down, 6 December 1976. He was educated at Edgehill College, Belfast. He was ordained as a Methodist minister in 1935, serving in circuits in Northern Ireland and in the Republic of Ireland. He retired through ill health in 1967, and lived thereafter in Bangor. Littlewood is remembered for 'Thou who dost rule on high'*, his only known hymn.  JRW

John Wesley

WESLEY, John. b. Epworth, Lincolnshire, 17 June 1703; d. London, 2 March 1791. He was the son of Samuel Wesley (I)*, rector of Epworth, the younger brother of Samuel Wesley (II)* and the older brother of Charles Wesley*. As a child of five John was saved from a dangerous fire at the rectory, 'a brand plucked from the burning'. He was educated at home under his remarkable mother, Susanna, 'the mother of Methodism', and then at Charterhouse School and Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1724, MA 1727). He...

Scottish hymnody

The hymns written and sung by Scottish Christians have been generally more rugged, strenuous and theologically nuanced than those of their co-religionists south of the Border, reflecting the harsher nature of their physical landscape, the greater seriousness and intensity of their faith, and the intellectual calibre of their ministry. Scottish hymn writers may not have had the smooth elegance or artistic accomplishment of their English counterparts — JJ ended its entry on them with the...

Hymns Ancient and Modern

Hymns Ancient and Modern for use in the Services of the Church (1861); Appendix, 1868; Second Edition, 1875; Supplement, 1889; New and Revised Edition, 1904; Second Supplement, 1916; Standard Edition, 1922; Hymns Ancient and Modern Revised, 1950; Hymns Ancient and Modern New Standard Edition, 1983; Common Praise, 2000; Ancient and Modern: Hymns and Songs for Refreshing Worship, 2013. [note: Sing Praise is annotated separately]. The 19th Century During the first half of the 19th century, the...

Welsh hymnody

This entry is in three parts: pre-Reformation Welsh hymnody by Sally Harper; post-Reformation hymnody, and Welsh tunes, by Alan Luff. Medieval Welsh hymnody Some form of liturgical hymnody was clearly sung in parts of the early 'Celtic' church in Wales. The 7th-century Latin Vita of St Samson (composed by a Breton monk) claims that St Illtud's death occurred as the community at Llantwit Major in Glamorgan was singing hymns, while St David's biographer Rhigyfarch (ca.1056–99) records David's...

William Augustus Muhlenberg

MUHLENBERG, William Augustus.  b. Philadelphia, 16 September 1796; d. New York City, 8 April 1877. William Augustus was the great-grandson of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg* 'the Patriarch of the Lutheran Church in America'. His name is sometimes spelt Mühlenberg, as in JJ, but he used it without an umlaut. William Augustus became a member of the Episcopal Church in his ninth year. Educated at Philadelphia Academy and the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) (AB 1814), he was ordained deacon...

Edward Miller

MILLER, Edward. b. Norwich, 30 October 1735; d. Doncaster, 12 September 1807. He was apprenticed to his father's trade as a paviour, but left to study music under Charles Burney. By self-education he became a man of considerable learning. He was made organist of Doncaster parish church in 1756 and held the post until his death. He took much interest in local affairs, publishing a history of Doncaster in 1804, but also built up a national network of patronage which enabled him to gather an...

Methodist hymnody, USA

        Hymns were used within the Methodist movement for teaching of doctrine, for evangelism (of the unsaved and to revive those who faith was lagging), for praise and confession. Important doctrines for the Wesleyan movement are Arminianism, the understanding that Christ died for everyone, not just the elect; the Christian journey as the way of salvation, on a continuum of God's prevenient grace (which comes before one is awakened to God's call), justifying and pardoning grace (forgiveness...

Mormon hymnody

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, widely known as the Mormon Church, was established in 1830 with six individuals. Joseph Smith (1805-44) received a series of visions in his teenage years, resulting in a church believed to contain restored doctrines and organizations long lost by disobedient humanity. The Book of Mormon was a document associated with Smith's revelations and the new church, which together influenced mission work...

Presbyterian Church of England hymnody

  Presbyterian Church of England Hymnody History Presbyterianism traces its origins back to the Reformation, when one element in the Protestant tradition was the dislike of human authority in religious matters, and the preference for government by 'presbyters' (from the Greek 'presbuteros', or 'elder') rather than bishops or priests. In Scotland the Reformation was guided by the powerful John Knox (1505-1572), who had studied under Jean Calvin* in Geneva; in both Scotland and England...

Samuel Stanley

STANLEY, Samuel. b. Birmingham, 1767 (baptized 15 May); d. Birmingham, 29 October 1822. He was a remarkable musician: choir trainer, cellist, and composer. He led the choir at Carr's Lane Chapel, Birmingham, from ca. 1787 to 1818, when he and the congregation moved to the larger Ebenezer Chapel, Steelhouse Lane. In both places the music became celebrated. As a cellist he was in demand as a performer, playing in London at Vauxhall Gardens in 1792 and at the Birmingham Festivals of 1799, 1802 and...

The Internet and Congregational Song

This essay examines four ways the Internet has influenced the study, accessibility, proliferation and practice of congregational song: the digitization of materials in the public domain, the born-digital and twinned digital combined with print materials, making digital objects findable and visible, and the emerging pedagogies. The main focus of this entry is on those resources that offer the full text or image of a hymn. Serious scholars should devote attention to The Hymn Tune Index*. See...

John Newton

NEWTON, John. b. Wapping, London, 24 July 1725; d. City of London, 21 December 1807. John Newton's father was a ship's master engaged in the Mediterranean trade, especially with Spain. His mother was a gentle and devout dissenter. She had a deep influence on her sensitive and highly intelligent son, whose early education she undertook personally. She encouraged him to learn by heart passages from the Bible, together with hymns, poems and the shorter catechisms of Isaac Watts*. During the...

Scottish Psalter

Scottish Psalter (1564). Words The metrical psalter was of immense importance in furthering and establishing the Reformation in Scotland. Even before the psalter of 1564, the Gude and Godlie Ballatis* of the Wedderburn brothers (see James Wedderburn* and John Wedderburn*) had brought the spirit of the continental reformers to Scotland in the 22 psalms translated into the rough vernacular. The Protestant exiles, who returned from Frankfurt, Geneva and elsewhere in the years immediately...

Emory University Hymnody Collection

The English and American Hymnody Collection of The Pitts Theology Library, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia   Introduction This entry is provides a basic understanding of the development of Emory University's English and American Hymnody Collection and introduces its great potential for research.Two of  the three largest institutional hymnal collections in North America are heavily indebted to one or more private collectors (Schneider, 2003; see Hymnal collections, USA*).  The third, The...

Congregational Church hymnody

Congregational Church hymnody in Britain The term 'Congregational hymnody' is significant for all churches and liturgical traditions where the congregation takes an active and full part in the singing of hymns (contrasted with those places or occasions where the hymns are the province of a specialised choir or the practice of a religious community). This article, however, is limited to an account of hymnody in churches of the Congregational order in England and Wales, during a period beginning...

Catholic Apostolic Church hymnody

The Catholic Apostolic Church, founded in 1835, is generally associated with the charismatic Scottish preacher (and friend of Thomas Carlyle*), Edward Irving (1792-1834); members of the denomination were often referred to as 'Irvingites'. Irving did lay some of the theological foundations of the Church, but he died in the very early years of the movement and before its foundation as a church, leaving John Bate Cardale (1802-77) and Henry Drummond (1786-1860), a well-to-do banker and Member of...

Benjamin Milgrove

MILGROVE, Benjamin. b. Bath, 1731; d. Bath, 1810. Little is known of Milgrove's life, except that he was precentor and organist of the Countess of Huntingdon's Chapel at Bath, and the keeper of a fancy goods shop. Wesley Milgate reports that he was a 'proprietor' or investor in John Wesley*'s New King Street Chapel in Bath to the tune of £100, a considerable sum at that time (Songs of the People of God, 1992, p. 293). He ceased to be a proprietor in 1787, perhaps because of the increasing...

Publishing and publishers, USA

Early Psalters, Hymnals, and Tunebooks During the 17th and 18th centuries American printers tended to be non-specialist, doing whatever type of printing came their way, whether newspapers, broadsides, government documents, educational textbooks, general interest books, or religious items. Authors, compilers, booksellers, or churches contracted with a printer to provide religious materials. The printer was paid by the person or group who contracted for the publication, and the latter received...

West Gallery music

'West Gallery music' has become the accepted name for a distinctive kind of sacred music that developed in rural England and flourished in Britain and its colonies from ca. 1700 to the late 19th century. Unlike the music of cathedrals and collegiate churches, it was written for, and frequently by, people with no formal training in music, who followed local traditional practice and their own instincts in performance and composition. Because organs were rare (and harmoniums not invented), from...

Come, all harmonious Tongues

Come, all harmonious Tongues. Isaac Watts* (1674-1748).  From Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Book II, 'Composed on Divine Subjects, Conformable to the Word of God'. It was Hymn 84, entitled 'The Same' (as the previous hymn, 'The Passion and Exaltation of Christ'). The text in 1707 was in eight Short Metre stanzas:    Come, all harmonious Tongues,  Your noblest Music bring;'Tis Christ the Everlasting God,  And Christ the Man we sing.    Tell how he took our Flesh  To take away our Guilt,...

Elizabeth Rowe

ROWE, Elizabeth (née Singer). b. Ilchester, Somerset, 11 September 1674; d. Frome, Somerset, 20 February 1737. She was well educated, partly at a boarding school, and partly by Henry Thynne, son of Viscount Weymouth, at Longleat, from whom she learned Italian and French. The family moved to Frome in 1692, by which time Elizabeth had already begun to contribute poems to John Dunton's Athenian Mercury, using the name 'Philomela'. (Dunton married Elizabeth Annesley, sister of Susanna Annesley, who...

Harriet Auber

AUBER, Henriette (Harriet). b. Spitalfields, London, 4 August 1773; d. Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire, 20 Jan 1862. Many Huguenot refugees settled in Spitalfields, and Henriette (who anglicized her name to Harriet) was descended from such a family. Her father, James Auber, was a Church of England rector. She seems to have lived an uneventful life ('quiet and secluded', according to JJ, p. 90), but she wrote poetry, published in The Spirit of the Psalms: or, a compressed version of select portions of...

Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing (Fawcett)

Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing/ Fill our hearts with love and peace. John Fawcett* (1740-1817). First published anonymously in a supplement to the 'Shawbury Hymn Book, Shrewsbury' (A Collection of Psalms and Hymns. Extracted from Dr Watts, and other Authors, 2nd Edition, Shrewsbury, 1773), and attributed to Fawcett in A Selection of Psalms & Hymns (1791) (the evidence for authorship is discussed in detail in JJ, p. 687). It was not included in Fawcett's own Hymns: adapted to the...

Synod of Relief hymns

The 'presbytery of relief' was founded in 1761 by three Scottish ministers, Thomas Gillespie of Dunfermline, Thomas Boston of Jedburgh, and Thomas Collier of Conisburgh, Fife, formerly of Ravenstonedale, Northumberland. Gillespie, who had been educated at the University of Edinburgh and under Philip Doddridge* at Northampton, had been deposed as minister of Carnock, near Dunfermline by the General Assembly in 1752. He had opposed the imposition of ministers by patronage, arguing that the people...

Master, speak! Thy servant heareth

Master, speak! Thy servant heareth. Frances Ridley Havergal* (1836-1879). Written on 19 May 1867 at Weston-super-Mare and published in Havergal's The Ministry of Song (1869) with the title 'Master, say on!'. It is based on 1 Samuel 3: 9. It had nine stanzas. Most books abbreviate to four, using 1, 6, 8 and 9 (as in MHB, BHB, and the Song Book of the Salvation Army (1953 and 1986 editions)). Some of the omitted stanzas have a personal and occasional element which makes them unsuitable for...

London hospitals and their hymns

The London Hospitals and their hymns The mid-18th century saw a remarkable burst of new London hospitals (in the wider sense of charitable homes), some of which played an important part in the development of hymnody. The reasons for the rapid rise of philanthropy are various. Greater sexual promiscuity resulting from early industrialization, urbanization, and the decline of the Puritan ethic had led to soaring numbers of births outside marriage, and to increases in prostitution and venereal...

English Praise

English Praise (1975) was sub-titled 'A Supplement to the English Hymnal'. It was the result of two perceived needs: the sense that the revised edition of EH, published in 1933 (with a revision of the music only, so that the texts dated back to 1906) was becoming out-dated; and the requirements of the Church of England at a time when liturgical practice was changing. These are clearly stated on p. v of the introduction, which discusses the hymns, none of which had been in EH: Some have already...

Elias Collection, Cambridge, UK

Elias Collection, Cambridge, UK The Elias Library of Hymnology consists of just over 3,500 volumes on hymnology, mostly from the 19th and early 20th centuries, but with some dating back to the 16th century. It is held at Westminster College, Cambridge.  The Library is primarily the collection of Edward Alfred Elias. Born in Liverpool in 1875, he lived in West Kirby, in the Wirral, throughout his life; and though little more is known about him, he was a lifelong collector of hymnological works...

Hymnologia Christiana

Hymnologia Christiana (1863). This was the title of a massive anthology of hymns compiled by Benjamin Hall Kennedy*, then Headmaster of Shrewsbury School (he used the title of his office on the title page, presumably to present his credentials). It contained 1500 hymns and 35 doxologies. It was sub-titled 'Psalms and Hymns selected and arranged in the Order of the Christian Seasons'. After Trinity Sunday there was a substantial section of about 360 hymns 'for the weeks after Trinity' (it is...

John Mason

MASON, John. b. Northamptonshire, possibly at Irchester, ca. 1646; d. Water Stratford, Buckinghamshire, May 1694 (buried 22 May). He was educated at Strixton (Northants), probably by William Farrow, and Clare Hall, Cambridge (BA 1665, MA 1668). He took Holy Orders in 1667. After a curacy at Upper Isham, Northamtonshire (1667-68), he became vicar of Stantonbury, Buckinghamshire (1668-74), and rector of Water Stratford (1675-94). He was the great-great-great-great-grandfather of John Mason...

Joseph Addison

ADDISON, Joseph. b. Milston, near Aylesbury, Wiltshire, 1 May 1672; d. Kensington, London, 17 June 1719. He was the son of a clergyman who became Dean of Lichfield. He was educated at Charterhouse and (after a period at Queen's College) Magdalen College, Oxford (BA 1691, MA 1693). He became a prominent man of letters: he first made his name with a poem, The Campaign, written in 1704 to celebrate the Duke of Marlborough's victory at Blenheim. He was extremely active politically in Whig circles,...

On Jordan's stormy banks I stand

On Jordan's stormy banks I stand. Samuel Stennett* (1727-1795). First published in John Rippon, A Selection of Hymns from the best authors (1787), where it was attributed to 'Dr. S. Stennett' and entitled 'The promised Land'. It was obviously based on the beautiful hymn by Isaac Watts*, 'There is a land of pure delight'*, to which it is close at times. It had seven stanzas: On Jordan's stormy Banks I stand,  And cast a wishful Eye;To Canaan's fair and happy Land,  Where my possessions...

O Jesu, source of calm repose

O Jesu, source of calm repose. Johann Anastasius Freylinghausen* (1670-1739), translated by John Wesley* (1703-1791). Freylinghausen's hymn began 'Wer ist wohl, wie du, Jesu süsze Ruh'. It was one of the first hymns to be translated by Wesley. He quoted stanza 6 of his rather free translation (the last of Freylinghausen's hymn, which had 13 stanzas) in a letter to Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf* dated 15 March 1736. He later published the translation (of stanzas 1, 3-5, 8 and 13) in his first...

Samuel Medley

MEDLEY, Samuel. b. Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, 23 June 1738; d. Liverpool, 17 July 1799. His father was a schoolmaster. He joined the Royal Navy, retiring from active service after being severely wounded at a battle off Port Lagos in 1759. He was converted by a sermon of Isaac Watts*, read to him by his grandfather, and by hearing George Whitefield* preach. In 1760 he joined a Baptist Church in Eagle Street, London. He opened a school, and also became a preacher, being 'set aside' to be a minister...

Thomas Jarman

JARMAN, Thomas. b. Clipston, Northamptonshire, 21 December 1776; d. 19 February 1861. The son of a tailor, he inherited his father's business which 'kept him poor and soured his temper' (Kant, 1931). He was one of the tradesmen of the time, mostly nonconformist, who wrote sacred music. A singing teacher and a multi instrumentalist, he took charge of the music at Clipston Baptist Church where there was no organ. Under his guidance the choir became well known and gave performances in Peterborough...

William Barton

BARTON, William. b. ca. 1597/8; d. 14 May 1678. Nothing is known of his early life. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1622, MA 1625), and ordained priest in 1623. He may have been the William Barton who was vicar of Mayfield, Staffordshire, in 1643, and who suffered for his Puritan sympathies at the hands of the local Royalists. Under the Commonwealth he flourished: he became minister of St John Zachary, London, in 1646, and vicar of St Martin's, Leicester (now Leicester...

William Gardiner

GARDINER, William. b. Leicester, 15 March 1769 (in some accounts of his life the date was falsified to hide the fact that he was born five months after his parents' wedding); d. Leicester, 16 November 1853. His father was a stocking manufacturer. William followed his father into the hosiery trade, but (again like his father) he was an amateur musician of some stature in the local community and beyond. He acquired a copy of Beethoven's String Trio, Op. 3, and played the viola in a performance in...

David Mansell

MANSELL, David John. b. South London, 11 March 1936. He was educated at King's College, London, where he read physics. He worked as an engineer and a physicist before becoming a full-time evangelist in London. He is known for his hymn 'Jesus is Lord! Creation's voice proclaims it'*, first published with its tune (also by Mansell) in Sound of Living Waters (1974). It quickly became popular at evangelical gatherings such as Spring Harvest*, and has been included in many recent British books,...

Daniel March

MARCH, Daniel. b. Milbury, Massachusetts, 21 July 1816; d. Woburn, Massachusetts, 2 March 1909. March was educated at Amherst College (1834-36), and Yale University (BA, 1840). After serving as principal of Fairfield Academy in Connecticut, he returned to Yale for his theological studies. He was ordained into the Presbyterian ministry in 1845, but later changed to Congregationalism, and served churches in Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania, and twice in Woburn, Massachusetts (1856-64,...

Caleb Evans

EVANS, Caleb. b. Bristol, 12 November 1737; d. 9 August 1791. Evans lived in Bristol for almost all of his life. His father, Hugh Evans, was pastor at Broadmead Baptist Church and President of the Bristol Baptist Academy run by the church. After training at the Mile End Academy in London, Caleb was baptised at Little Wild Street Baptist Church, and called to ministry in 1757, becoming associate minister with Josiah Thompson at Unicorn Yard Baptist church in London. In 1759 he was called to join...

Chris Fenner

FENNER, Christopher Jon. b. Kalamazoo, Michigan, 28 February 1981. Chris Fenner is a hymnologist, archivist, and church musician. The son of Richard and Gerri (née Emmons) Fenner, he was reared in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He holds degrees from Western Michigan University (BA in Music Education, 2003), The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, School of Church Music* (MA in Worship, 2011), and the University of Kentucky (Master of Library and Information Science, 2017). He has been a K-12 music...

Carmelite hymns

The Carmelites began as a group of hermits in the area of Mount Carmel known as the wadi 'ain es-siah at the end of the 12th or the beginning of the 13th century. Singing hymns necessarily played a minimal role in the liturgical life of the original Carmelites, since as hermits they did not chant the Divine Office together. The rule or way of life they received from Albert, Patriarch of Jerusalem 1206-1214, made it clear that they were to come together to celebrate Mass daily but that each...

Come, ye that know and fear the Lord

Come, ye that know and fear the Lord. George Burder* (1752-1832). First published in Burder's A Collection of Hymns, from Various Authors. Intended as a Supplement to Dr Watts's Hymns, and Imitation of the Psalms (Coventry, 1784). It was entitled 'God is love', and was signed 'B'. It had nine verses, three of which were in square brackets (a practice borrowed from Watts). Since variant texts of this hymn exist, it is useful to have the original form: Come, ye that know and fear the Lord, ...

Esther Rothenbusch Crookshank

CROOKSHANK, Esther Rothenbusch. b. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 12 July 1958. Esther Rothenbusch Crookshank, musicologist and hymnologist, has served on the faculty of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (SBTS) in Louisville, Kentucky, since August 1994, where she succeeded Hugh T. McElrath* as professor of hymnology. She was installed as Ollie Hale Chiles Professor of Church Music in September 2004. She was born Esther Heidi Rothenbusch, the daughter of Jakob Rothenbusch III and Irene...

John Wyeth

WYETH, John. b. Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 31 March 1770; d. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 23 January 1858. Best known as an American music publisher, Wyeth began as a printer's apprentice at age 17. At 21, he became manager of a printing company in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. In 1791, he returned to America, having narrowly escaped with his life in the Haitian insurrection. First working in Philadelphia, and finally settling in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Wyeth continued in...

What wondrous love is this

What wondrous love is this. Anonymous American folk hymn. The first joint meeting of the Hymn Society of Great Britain and Ireland* (HSGBI), the International Fellowship for Research in Hymnody (Internationale Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Hymnologie, IAH), and the Hymn Society of America (now The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada*) was held at St Catherine's College, Oxford, 24-29 August 1981. Each of the Presidents, or Chairman in the case of HSGBI, was asked to choose hymns that...

Kenneth Morris

MORRIS, Kenneth. b. Jamaica, New York, 28 August 1917; d. Chicago, Illinois, 1 February 1989. A gospel song composer and publisher, Morris was the son of Ettuila (née White) and John Morris. Though he attended the Manhattan Conservatory of Music where he studied classical music, his first interest was in jazz piano. He formed the Kenneth Morris Jazz Band in New York City. An invitation to perform at the Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago in 1934 changed the course of his life. He...

George Burder

BURDER, George. b. London, 5 June 1752; d. 29 May 1832. Burder trained as an engraver, but became a preacher of the Calvinistic Methodist persuasion, and subsequently a pastor in Independent chapels. He served the Independent or Congregational chapels at Lancaster (1777-83), Coventry (1783-1800), and Fetter Lane, London (1800- ). He was a forceful promoter of evangelical activity: he was one of the founders of the Religious Tract Society, the London Missionary Society, and the British and...

Come gracious Spirit, heavenly dove

Come, gracious Spirit, heavenly dove. Simon Browne* (1680-1732). First published in Browne's Hymns and Spiritual Songs, in Three Books, designed as a Supplement to Dr Watts (1720), where it was entitled 'The Soul giving itself up to the Conduct and Influence of the Holy Spirit'. It had seven stanzas. It began with a first line, 'Come, Holy Spirit, heav'nly Dove', which was identical to the first line of one of Isaac Watts*'s hymns. Perhaps to distinguish the two, the first line was altered in...

John Rippon

RIPPON, John. b. Tiverton, Devon, 29 April 1751; d. London, 17 December 1836. Born into a devout Baptist family, he studied at the Bristol Baptist Academy (1769-73) and became pastor of the influential Carter Lane Particular Baptist Church in Southwark, London, where he served from 1773 until his death 63 years later. Active in all denominational and many Dissenting activities, Rippon promoted a moderate Calvinism and encouraged many new ventures in Baptist life. He published the Baptist Annual...

God of grace, O let Thy light

God of grace, O let thy light. Edward Churton* (1800-1874). From Churton's The Book of Psalms in English Verse (1854), sometimes (as in JJ) called 'The Cleveland Psalter'. It was Churton's second paraphrase of Psalm 67, 'God be merciful unto us, and bless us; and cause his face to shine upon us… That thy way may be known upon earth, thy saving health among all nations.' It was included in Benjamin Hall Kennedy*'s Hymnologia Christiana (1863) as a hymn for Whitsuntide, omitting Churton's final...

Native American/ First Nations Peoples of North America: their Christian Hymns

[Note: The terms most commonly used for North American aboriginal peoples are 'Native Americans' in the USA and 'First Nations' in Canada. Anthropologists and ethnologists tend to prefer language group designations, which often are not necessarily appropriately designated by national borders][1]   In North American hymnody there is no Christian tradition or denominational heritage that embodies the volume of productivity of hymns and hymnbooks that exists in Native American languages. The...

Hymns and Poems by Elizabeth Scott

Hymns and Poems by Elizabeth Scott  Among the collections in the Beineke Rare Book & Manuscript Library of Yale University is a manuscript volume by Elizabeth Scott*. Although a label on the spine the shows 'Hymns & Poems by Eliz. Scott', the manuscript itself shows no title. In the 19th century, John Julian*, in JJ, called it 'Yale College MS', and today it is the main constituent of GEN MSS VOL. 635.  This 'Yale College MS' consists of 90 hymns and poems (henceforth, just 'hymns')....

Songs of Praise

Songs of Praise (1925); Songs of Praise Enlarged (1931). This entry includes Songs of Praise (1925) and Songs of Praise Enlarged (1931). On the cover the latter is entitled Songs of Praise with Music. Songs of Praise was edited by Percy Dearmer*, Ralph Vaughan Williams*, and Martin Shaw*. Its aim, as stated in the preface, was 'to make a national collection of hymns for use in public worship, and also of such “spiritual songs” as are akin to hymns and suitable for certain kinds of services in...

Church Hymns

Church Hymns (1871), Church Hymns with Tunes (1874). The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) had printed hymns since 1837, when it added them to a reprint of Tate* and Brady*'s Metrical Psalms, the New Version*. In subsequent editions, more hymns were added, and then printed separately from the Psalms in 1852. Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship followed in 1855, with an Appendix in 1863, edited by Berdmore Compton, then rector of Barford, Warwickshire. Some churches, such as St...

Environment, hymns of

The word 'environment' can be understood in very many different ways. In its most general sense it can mean all that surrounds us, particularly the natural world with its trees, mountains, plains and seas. Of course the idea of 'environment' can equally be applied to urban surroundings, to our homes and indeed to the universe as a whole. Throughout the history of hymn writing, hymn writers have responded to the many facets of the term. In recent times, human beings have become more conscious...

Disposer supreme, and Judge of the earth

Disposer supreme, and Judge of the earth. Jean-Baptiste de Santeuil* (1630-1697), translated by Isaac Williams* (1802-1865). De Santeuil's Latin original began: Supreme quales, Arbiter Tibi ministros eligis, Tues opes qui vilibus Vasis amas committere. It appeared in the Cluniac Breviary of 1686, in de Santeuil's Hymni Sacri et Novi (1689), and in later French Breviaries, including the Paris Breviary of 1736. Isaac Williams's translation was published in the British Magazine (June 1836),...

Our country is Immanuel's ground

Our country is Immanuel's ground. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1742-1825).  This is a selection of stanzas from a hymn published in Barbauld's Poems (1792) beginning 'Lo where a crowd of Pilgrims toil/ Yon craggy steeps among!' The usual selection of stanzas begins as above, which is different from Barbauld's first line ('...Emanuel's land').   She portrays the pilgrims as singing on their way: “Our country is Emanuel's land, We seek that promised soil; The songs of Zion chear our hearts, ...

Patrick Matsikenyiri (1)

MATSIKENYIRI, Patrick. b. Biriri, Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), 27 July 1937; d. Mutare, Zimbabwe, 15 January 2021. Patrick Matsikenyiri's career included virtually all aspects of church music—singing, choral directing, composition, hymnal editor, festival leader, professor, and enlivener of global songs in venues worldwide. In the spirit of a Shona proverb—'If you can talk, you can sing. If you can walk, you can dance'—he believed music was for everyone.  After serving as a headmaster for...

O what shall I do my Saviour to praise

O what shall I do my Saviour to praise. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742), entitled 'A Thanksgiving'. It followed 'Wrestling Jacob' ('Come, O thou Traveller unknown'*) and was succeeded by two other hymns of thanksgiving, 'O heavenly King, look down from above'*, and 'My Father, my God, I long for thy love'. The last of these has not been used subsequently in hymnbooks. All three thanksgiving hymns were printed in 10-syllable lines, with a space and...

Hear us, O Lord, from heaven thy dwelling-place

Hear us, O Lord, from heaven thy dwelling-place. William Henry Gill* (1839-1923). This is known as 'The Manx Fishermen's Evening Hymn'. It was written by Gill to fit a ballad tune from the Isle of Man, and published in his Manx National Songs (1896). The fishermen from the Isle of Man used to ask for God's blessing before casting their nets, and Gill prefaced the hymn with a quotation from the Manx Book of Common Prayer: '…that it may please thee to give and preserve to our use the kindly...

He sat to watch o'er customs paid

He sat to watch o'er customs paid. William Bright* (1824-1901). This text for St Matthew's Day (21 September) was first printed in the Supplement (1889) to the Second Edition of A&M. It had six stanzas, the first of which is a description of a tax collector: He sat to watch o'er customs paid,A man of scorn'd and hard'ning trade;Alike the symbol and the toolOf foreign masters' hated rule. The following stanzas demonstrate the change in St Matthew when he was called by Jesus (Matthew 9:...

Sandemanian hymnody

The Sandemanian Church was formed in Scotland, ca. 1730, by John Glas (1695-1773), who was dismissed from his charge as minister of Tealing, near Dundee, and who formed an independent church of his followers, opposed to the authority of anything except Holy Scripture, and believing that the death of Jesus Christ was sufficient to present even the worst sinner spotless before God (this antinomian doctrine was the subject of James Hogg's Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner,...

Jesu! the very thought of Thee

Jesu! the very thought of Thee. Latin, probably 12th century, translated by Edward Caswall* (1814-1878). This is a translation of the Latin text beginning 'Iesu dulcis memoria'*. The translation was published in Caswall's Lyra Catholica (1849). It is from a selection of verses used in the Roman Breviary (Caswall later translated the whole hymn, publishing it in The Masque of Mary, and Other Poems in 1858). There have been many other translations of the whole hymn, sometimes known as 'Iubilis...

W. Hope Davison

DAVISON, W(illiam) Hope. b. Sunderland, 27 November 1827; d. Plymouth, August 1894. He was a Congregational minister (ordained 1832) of Duke's-Alley Chapel, Bolton, in 1857, when he compiled and edited Psalms and Hymns for Public and Social Worship (Bolton, 1857), and afterwards at St George's Road Congregational Church, Bolton. He later served as a minister at Chatham, Pentonville, Tooting, and Plymouth. He also published The Sunday Scholars' Service of Sacred Song, in what appears to have...

Countryside, hymns

Hymns which have references to the countryside have existed since the days of the early church and continue to be an essential part of worship. The psalms, for example, contain references to the grass which grows and dies (Psalm 90), to the flowers which bloom and fade (Psalm 103), to the beasts of the field (Psalm 8) and to the harvest (Psalm 65). These references, and others to the hills, the sea, the clouds and the sky, suggest that there was a consciousness of the natural world even before...

Patrick Brennan

See 'Hail Redeemer, King divine'*

Christian Science Church hymnody and hymnals

Origins and chief tenets of the Christian Science Church The Christian Science Church or, as it is more formally called, the First Church of Christ (Scientist) was officially incorporated in Boston, Massachusetts in 1879 by Mary Baker Eddy* (1821-1910). Eddy's seminal publication, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, appeared in Boston in 1875 followed by the first official denominational hymnal (Boston, 1892). Reading the Bible alongside Science and Health is fundamental to the...

My Lord, what a morning (mourning)

My Lord, what a morning (mourning). African American spiritual*. The standard version of the text that appears in hymnals today follows:  My Lord, what a morning;my Lord, what a morning;Oh, my Lord, what a morning,when the stars begin to fall.  1. You'll hear the trumpet sound,to wake the nations underground,looking to my God's right hand,when the stars begin to fall.  2. You'll hear the sinner moan . . .  3. You'll hear the Christian shout . . . These few words conjure up powerful...

Trinity hymns

Trinity hymns The hymn is an ideal vehicle for the rejection of heresy, and Trinitarian teaching has therefore been central to Christian hymnody in both the Eastern and Western churches. The nature of the Trinity is a central doctrine of Christian orthodoxy; its classic formulation is that established in the 4th-century Nicene Creed, which is the basis for subsequent explorations of the characteristics of the three Persons of the Trinity and the relationship between them. It is based on the...

William Mercer

MERCER, William. b. Barnard Castle, County Durham, 1811; d. Sheffield, 21 August 1873. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1835, MA 1840). He was appointed Perpetual Curate of St George's, Sheffield, in 1840, and remained there until his death. He is chiefly known as the editor of The Church Psalter and Hymn Book (1854), one of the principal Church of England hymnbooks before A&M. It was enlarged from 400 hymns to 510 in 1856 (although the 1856 preface says that the book...

Muggletonian songs

The origins of the Muggletonians are to be found in the ferment of religious and political ideas that followed the breakdown of established authority at the start of the English Civil War. The two London tailors who founded the sect, John Reeve (1608-1658) and his cousin Lodowick Muggleton (1609-1698), were both from a Puritan background and were for a time attracted to the Ranters, whom they subsequently denounced. It was Reeve who, on 3, 4 and 5 February 1651 received a series of visions,...

Anglican hymnody, Canadian

This article considers congregational song in the Church of England (later, The Anglican Church of Canada) in that part of British North America which became known as Canada. It does not deal with hymnody in Newfoundland, a separate British colony until 1949, when it became a Canadian province. Systematic British settlement in Canada began in 1763, after France ceded sovereignty to Britain. During the 18th century, the singing repertoire and practices of the Church of England in Canada...

O scorn'd and outcast Lord, beneath

O scorn'd and outcast Lord, beneath. Charles Coffin* (1676-1749), translated by John Chandler* (1806-1876). Coffin's hymn, beginning 'Opprobiis, Jesu, satur', was from the Paris Breviary of 1836, and Coffin's Hymni Sacri (1836). According to JJ, p. 872, it was the Ferial Hymn at Matins during Passion Week and thereafter until Maundy Thursday. The translation comes from Chandler's Hymns of the Primitive Church (1837). It was printed in the Supplement (1889) to the Second Edition of...

John Pike Hullah

HULLAH, John Pike. b. Worcester, 27 June 1812; d. London, 21 February 1884. He studied at the Royal Academy of Music (1833-35). He wrote an opera, The Village Coquettes (1836), to a libretto by Charles Dickens. He studied singing at Paris, and taught many thousands of pupils by the continental 'fixed-doh' method, a system that was superseded by John Curwen*'s moveable 'doh' method, the popular 'Tonic Sol-fa'*. For a time, however, his influence was important. As Nicholas Temperley* has pointed...

Franciscan hymns and hymnals

Since the foundation of their order in 1209 or 1210, the contribution of Franciscan writers to western Christianity has been immense, particularly in the areas of theology, preaching, and hymn composition. Since their hymns address both the needs of liturgy and their vocation as preachers, Franciscan writing reflects the ambitions of learned society and the varied tastes of vernacular culture. Their major contributions include a reform in the 13th century of the chant books for the monastic...

Hark! ten thousand harps and voices

Hark! ten thousand harps and voices. Thomas Kelly* (1769-1855). According to JJ, p. 488, this was first published in Kelly's Hymns on Various Passages of Scripture (Second Edition, Dublin, 1806) in seven 6-line stanzas. It was headed 'Let all the Angels of God worship him. Heb. 1.6.': Hark ten thousand harps and voices,   Sound the note of praise above! Jesus reigns, and heav'n rejoices:   Jesus reigns the God of love: See, he sits on yonder throne; Jesus rules the world alone. Well may...

Children's hymnody, USA

Singing is a natural activity for children, and one of the most certain ways of passing on doctrine and history of faith is through hymn singing. Because of its ability to draw people into community while teaching doctrine, singing hymns strengthens the fostering of religious values. There is evidence that the teaching of hymnody happened with boys in monasteries as early as the fifth century, and after 1200 there is evidence of girls taking part in monastic liturgical singing. Though we may...

Shepherds came, their praises bringing

Shepherds came, their praises bringing. Latin, translated by George Bradford Caird* (1917-1984). This is a translation of the Latin carol 'Quem pastores laudavere'*. It was made by Caird in 1944, when he was minister of Highgate Congregational Church, London, and published in CP (1951). It was revised in 1981, and published in its new form in HFTC (1982). In verse 3 the later text follows the Latin in its reference to Mary ('Per Mariam nobis dato'), which Caird had left out in...

Charles Coffin

COFFIN, Charles. b. Buzancy, 4 October 1676; d. 20 June 1749. Buzancy is a small town in the present-day département of Ardennes, in the diocese of Rheims. Coffin left there in 1693 for Paris to complete his education. He was an outstanding student: as the favoured successor of Charles Rollin, he became a tutor of the Collège de Beauvais and then (1712) its head. In 1718 he was elected rector of the University of Paris and did much to reorganize its finances. He was entrusted with delivering...

Plainsong Hymnbook

A Plainsong Hymnbook (1932). The Plainsong Hymnbook was the work of the Proprietors of A&M, who were anxious to promote a kind of hymnody that had been to some extent neglected in previous editions. They were aware that the Plainsong and Medieval Music Society, founded in 1888, had drawn attention to the riches of liturgical chant and medieval music, and that the rediscovery in the 19th century of early Latin and Greek Christian hymns had significantly increased the resources for worship,...

Charles Wesley

WESLEY, Charles. b. Epworth, Lincolnshire, 18 December 1707; d. London, 29 March 1788. He was youngest son and 16th/17th child (though calculations vary) of Samuel Wesley (I)* and the redoubtable Susanna, and younger brother to John*. From Westminster School (1716-26), first as King's Scholar and finally Captain of the school, he gained a scholarship to Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1730, MA 1733). He became leader (in John's absence as their father's curate) of a small group known as the 'Holy...

The royal banners forward go

The royal banners forward go. Venantius Fortunatus* (ca. 540-early 7th century), translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This is a translation of the Latin hymn, 'Vexilla Regis prodeunt'*, written to celebrate the reception of the fragment of the true cross at Poitiers. It appeared in Neale's Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (1851) in five stanzas, followed by two more in square brackets: [O Cross, our one reliance, hail! This holy Passiontide, avail To give fresh merit to the Saint, And...

With hearts in love abounding

With hearts in love abounding. Harriet Auber* (1773-1862). Published in The Spirit of the Psalms: or, a compressed version of select portions of the Psalms of David, adapted to Christian worship (1829), where it is Auber's version of Psalm 45. It was printed in the SPCK Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship (1852), edited by Thomas Vincent Fosbery*. In that book it was headed 'After Trinity Sunday', and printed in three 8-line stanzas: With hearts in love abounding,  Prepare we now to singA...

Asahel Nettleton

NETTLETON, Asahel. b. North Killingworth, Connecticut, 21 April 1783; d, East Windsor,Connecticut, 16 May 1844. Nettleton was an itinerant revivalist of the conservative (Calvinistic) wing of the Congregational Church, and compiler of Village Hymns for Social Worship* (Hartford, Connecticut, 1824). He was converted when a teenager. Following the death of his father, he managed the family's farm and finances, and taught school. A local Presbyterian minister prepared him for entering Yale College...

Become to us the living bread

  Become for us the living bread. Miriam Drury* (1900-1985). This hymn, one of several by the author that won awards in competitions sponsored by The Hymn Society in America (nowThe Hymn Society in the United States and Canada*), was written in 1970. The best known hymn by this author, it first appeared in The Worshipbook—Services and Hymns (Philadelphia, 1972), a joint Presbyterian hymnal for the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Presbyterian Church (USA), and the United Presbyterian Church in...

Hymnal collections, USA

There are more than 300 hymnal collections in the United States ranging from personal collections, those held by independent institutions such as museums, historical associations, or public libraries, and collections owned by academic institutions. While nearly every collection includes items from a number of traditions, some have unique holdings. The largest hymnal collection in the United States is that held by The Pitts Theological Library, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, with...

John Tufts

TUFTS, John. b. Medford, Massachusetts, 26 February 1689; d. Amesbury, Massachusetts, 17 August 1750.  Tufts was a minister, merchant, probably a singing teacher, and possibly a composer.  He compiled An Introduction to the Art of Singing Psalm-Tunes (1721?), considered the first American music textbook. John Tufts was the third son of Captain Peter Tufts (1648-1721) and Mercy Cotton Tufts (1666-1715).  He graduated from Harvard College (AB, 1708), and was ordained on 30 June 1714 in...

Jacque Browning Jones

JONES, Jacque Browning. b. Texas City, Texas, 20 October 1950. A hymnwriter with a varied career in business and government service, she attended Baylor University (1968-1970) and The University of Texas at Austin (1970-1973) (BFA in Theater, with an emphasis in directing and choreography). Raised a Presbyterian, Jones has been a member of Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York, since 1987. Her career included working for the government, for an accounting firm, and for a bank in data processing...

Let's Praise!

Let's Praise! The Let's Praise! series of hymnals contains two volumes; the first, published in 1988, was subtitled 'The Worship Songbook for a New Generation' and the second, published in 1994, was simply entitled Let's Praise! 2. They were published by Harper Collins under the Marshall Pickering imprint, and were produced in association with Jubilate Hymns*. The principal editor of both volumes was David Peacock*, assisted in both cases by Michael Perry*. Graham Kendrick* is named as a...

Martin Madan

MADAN, Martin. b. London, 5 October 1725; d. Epsom, Surrey, 2 May 1790. He was the son of Colonel Martin Madan (1700–56), MP for Hertingfordbury, Herts, and equerry to Frederick, prince of Wales; he was a cousin of William Cowper*. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1746), and called to the Bar in 1748. He led a dissolute life until he was converted in 1750 on hearing John Wesley* preach on the text 'Prepare to meet thy God'; later he came under the influence of...

Mark Miller

MILLER, Mark Andrew. b. Burlington, Vermont, 7 January 1967. Mark Miller is a pianist, organist, singer, composer, choral conductor, church musician, educator, and active lay person in the United Methodist Church. He is currently an Associate Professor of Church Music, Director of the Chapel, and Composer-In-Residence at Drew Theological School in Madison, New Jersey, and since 2006, a Lecturer in the Practice of Sacred Music in the Institute of Sacred Music at Yale University. Miller also...

Samuel Babcock

BABCOCK, Samuel. b. Milton, Massachusetts, 18 February 1760; d. French Mills (now Fort Covington), New York, 23 November 1813. He was a composer, singing master, and compiler of The Middlesex Harmony, in two editions, consisting entirely of his own compositions. He was the fourth of nine children born to John Badcock (1731- nda) and Rachael Adams Badcock (ca. 1731- nda). The spelling of the surname was changed to Babcock during Samuel's early years (Collected Works, p. xxi).  Samuel married...

Shin'ichi Takanami

TAKANAMI, Shin'ichi. b. Tokyo, Japan, 28 February 1941.  A hymn tune composer, Takanami and his family lived in Nagano Prefecture between 1945 and 1959. He was baptized at Nagano Agata-machi Church (United Church of Christ in Japan) in 1957. After graduating from Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo (MME, 1965), he began his career as a music teacher at Tamagawa Academy and University (Tokyo). In 1983, he returned to his alma mater to teach, remaining there as Associate Professor of Music...

Thomas Cotterill

COTTERILL, Thomas. b. Cannock, Staffordshire, 4 December 1779; d. Sheffield, 29 December 1823. He was educated locally, at the Free School, Birmingham, and at St John's College, Cambridge (BA 1801, MA 1805), of which he became a Fellow. He took Holy Orders, becoming curate of Tutbury, Staffordshire (1803), and incumbent of Lane End, Staffordshire (1808-17). He moved to Sheffield in 1817, becoming perpetual curate of St Paul's church until his death. At Sheffield he met James Montgomery*, who...

Faith of our fathers! living still

Faith of our fathers! living still. Frederick William Faber* (1814-1863). Published in Jesus and Mary: or, Catholic Hymns for Singing and Reading (1849), and later reissued in Faber's Oratory Hymns (1854). It was conceived as part of a project to provide Roman Catholics with accessible vernacular hymns, at a time when selections from Bishop Richard Challoner's Garden of the Soul (1740) were still the staple of non-liturgical musical expression. In its original form, it spoke to Catholics of...

James Martineau

MARTINEAU, James. b. Norwich, 21 April 1805; d. London, 11 Jan 1900. He was born into a Unitarian family of Huguenot descent, and educated at Norwich Grammar School and at the school at Bristol run by the distinguished Unitarian Dr Lant Carpenter. He became an engineering apprentice at Derby, but decided to become a Unitarian minister and entered Manchester College, then at York, in 1822. In 1828 he became minister of Eustace Street Presbyterian Meeting House, Dublin, and in 1832 moved to...

John Byrom

BYROM, John. b. Manchester, 29 February 1692; d. Manchester, 26 Sept 1763. Byrom was born into a prosperous family of merchants and landowners, and received his formal education at Chester Free Grammar School, Merchant Taylors' School (then occupying a site in the heart of the City of London) and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA, 1712; MA, 1715), where he was elected to a college fellowship in 1714. This education was intended, in his father's words, 'to fit [him] for sacred orders', but Byrom's...

Oxford Movement

This is the name given to a movement within the Church of England which endeavoured to resist government interference in the church affairs and reaffirm the authority of the church as a holy and divinely authenticated institution. Its origins were political as well as religious (Nockles, 1994). The early adherents of the movement were concerned at the passing of the Reform Bill in 1832; at the appointment of bishops and Regius Professors of Theology by the government; at what they saw as a...

The Hymnary (1872)

The Hymnary (1872). The editors of The Hymnary (1872) were William Cooke*, Honorary Canon of Chester, and Benjamin Webb*, vicar of St Andrew's, Wells Street, London. It was published by Novello, Ewer & Co., following the decision of the Proprietors of A&M to transfer the printing of their book from Novello to William Clowes. Thus The Hymnary was born out of commercial rivalry, and its editors must have been instructed to make a more attractive book than A&M  (1861) and...

Evangelical and Reformed Church hymnody, USA

German Reformed Immigration and Organization German Reformed immigrants came to America largely from the Palatinate in south-west Germany on the Rhine River. There, in 1562 at Heidelberg University, Caspar Olevianus (1536-1587) and Zacharias Ursinus (1534-1583) prepared the Heidelberg Catechism and the Palatinate Liturgy. This area received the Reformation about the time of Luther's death (1546), became a seedbed of religious rivalry, and especially after the beginning of the Thirty Years'...

Community of Christ hymnody

Historical background Community of Christ is an international Christian denomination with approximately 250,000 members in more than 50 countries. Until 2001, the denomination, which has its headquarters in Independence, Missouri, was known as the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (commonly abbreviated as 'RLDS'). The church shares a common beginning with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ('LDS'), founded in 1830 by Joseph Smith, Jr. (1805-1844). After the...

Disciples of Christ hymnody

One way to describe the Disciples is as a 19th-century religious experiment planted on North American soil from Scots-Irish and United States Presbyterian roots sprinkled with Baptist and Congregationalist waters. Three of the four acknowledged founders of this religious experiment were first generation immigrants to the United States. Only Barton Warren Stone (1772-1844) was born on US soil, near Port Tobacco, Maryland. Thomas Campbell (1763-1854) and his son Alexander (1788-1866) arrived in...

Swedenborgian hymnody

Swedenborgians are the followers of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), a distinguished Swedish mathematician and scientist, whose life was changed in 1745 by the 'opening of his spiritual sight', after which he taught a series of doctrines drawn from the Word of God coupled with his ability to see heaven and hell and converse with angels and spirits. He rejected the orthodox doctrine of the Atonement, preferring the idea that the end of creation is that human beings can become the image of their...

Margaret Cropper

CROPPER, Margaret Beatrice. b. Kendal, Westmorland (now Cumbria), 29 August 1886; d. Kendal, 27 September 1980. She was educated privately. She became a Sunday-school teacher in 1900, and superintendent of a Sunday kindergarten at Staveley, near Kendal, ca. 1925. She lived in or near Kendal for the whole of her life, apart from two trips to South Africa. She was well known as a playwright and poet. Her plays, some one-act, some full-length, included comedies, and plays on religious topics such...

O, David was a shepherd lad

O David was a shepherd lad. Charles Erskine Clarke* (1871-1926). Written in 1925 for a competition organized by the compilers of the Church and School Hymnal (1926). This was the winning entry. Its three 8-line stanzas may be compared with 'With a shout of bold derision'* by Clarke's older contemporary, George Bett Blanchard*. Blanchard's hymn is a vivid account of the fight between David and Goliath (1 Samuel 17), whereas Clarke's hymn has another purpose: in all three stanzas Clarke compares...

When Easter to the dark world came

When Easter to the dark world came. William (H) Hamilton* (1886-1958). First published in Children Praising (1937), a book for younger children edited by Hamilton, with H.E. Wiseman as music editor. It had six stanzas. It has been reprinted in some Sunday school and children's books such as Partners in Praise (1979), and it appeared in HP and RS. In RS, Hamilton's stanza 4 — 'When Thomas' heart with grief was black/ Then Jesus like a king came back' — was altered, and a new stanza added: When...

Benson Collection, Princeton Theological Seminary

Benson Collection, Princeton Theological Seminary.The Louis F. Benson Hymnology Collection is one of the premier collections for the study of the history of Christian hymnody in North America. It consists of over 12,000 volumes of hymnals and printed materials related to the study of Christian hymnody. The collection was originally received by Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, New Jersey, in 1931 from the estate of Louis F. Benson*. Benson was the author of a number of works on...

Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ

Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ. Jakob Ebert* (1549-1614). This hymn is found in EG in three stanzas in the 'Schöpfung, Frieden, Gerechtigkeit' section (EG 422). As the first line, 'Thou Prince of Peace, Lord Jesus Christ' suggests, it belongs in the 'Frieden' ('peace') part of this section. It is found in Wackernagel, Das Deutsche Kirchenlied III. 413, with the title 'Um Frieden zu bitten' ('To plead for peace'), one of only two hymns by Ebert in DDK. It was printed in Geistliche deutsche...

Lonely the boat

  Lonely the Boat. Helen Kim* (1899-1979).   This was composed in the Korean language in 1921. It is Helen Kim's best known text. It appeared in the Korean language for the first time in ShinJung Chansongka, a revised and expanded ecumenical hymnal (Seoul, 1931). The translation, with the Korean original, appeared first in Hymns from the Four Winds (Nashville, 1983). The versification was prepared for UMH. The Korean text was translated in 1980 by Hae Jong Kim (b. 1935), the first Korean...

South African freedom songs

The anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa captured the attention of the world during the 1980s. News reports from CNN often included singing black South Africans and their supporters singing songs of freedom. These songs were disseminated to the Western world in the mid-1980s largely through the work of Anders Nyberg* (1955- ) under the sponsorship of the Church of Sweden Mission (Lutheran). Nyberg took choirs to South Africa who, in turn, learned songs from South African choirs. Many of...

Ambrose of Milan

AMBROSE of Milan. b. Trier, 339 (or 340); d. Milan, 4 Apr 397. Born into a Roman Christian family, Ambrose pursued the cursus honorum (the ladder of advancement within the Roman public hierarchy) and became governor of the province of Emilia-Liguria in 370, moving to Milan. On the death of the Arian bishop, Auxence, Ambrose was chosen by the people as their bishop, was baptised and, one week later, was consecrated (1 Dec 373 or 7 Dec 374). During the 23 years of his episcopate, he represented...

Adam of St Victor

ADAM of St Victor. d. Paris, 1146. The earliest identification of this figure is probably the signature 'Subdeacon Adam' in a 1098 charter of Notre Dame cathedral, Paris. He was certainly precentor there by 1107, although he became an Augustinian canon* at the Abbey of St Victor in Paris ca. 1133 after being part of a failed attempt to impose the Augustinian rule on the cathedral canons. A vita of Adam was later written by a monk of the Abbey of St Victor, William of St Lô (d. 1349). In modern...

Lord, I want to be a Christian

Lord, I want to be a Christian. African American spiritual*. 'Lord, I want to be a Christian' is among a canon of African American spirituals that appears both in mainline denominational hymnals and in African American hymnals in the United States. It was first published in Folk Songs of the American Negro edited by Frederick Jerome Work* (1878?-1942) (Nashville, 1907) with an introduction by John W. Work, Jr. (John Wesley Work (II)*, 1872?-1925). This publication was the outgrowth of the...

Blest are the pure in heart

Blest are the pure in heart. John Keble* (1792-1866), and William John Hall* (1793-1861)/ Edward Osler* (1798-1863). The text of this hymn is normally one of four stanzas, beginning as follows: Blest are the pure in heart The Lord who left the heavens Still to the lowly soul Lord, we thy presence seek Stanzas 1 and 3 were taken from a poem by Keble dated 10 October 1819. It was entitled 'The Purification of St Mary the Virgin', with the sub-heading '“Blessed are the pure in heart: for...

O heavenly Jerusalem

O heavenly Jerusalem. Latin, Eighteenth Century, translated by Isaac Williams* (1802-1865). This is a translation of a Latin hymn, 'Caelestis O Jerusalem', found in a Toulouse Breviary of 1777 and a Paris Breviary of 1822, set for Matins on All Saints' Day. Williams's translation was printed in his Hymns translated from the Paris Breviary (1839). It was included in the First Edition of A&M (1861), after which it became well known. It had six stanzas in 1861: O heavenly Jerusalem,   Of...

Welsh carols

This entry is in two parts, the first by Sally Harper, the second by Alan Luff. Welsh carols before 1700 There is little evidence to confirm that Wales had its own vernacular counterpart to the regular strophic structure and repeated burden of the English medieval carol (See 'English carols'*), although two carol-like texts recorded retrospectively from oral tradition in the 1950s in rural Cardiganshire may indeed be medieval survivals. Both are couched in rhymed accentual verse with a burden...

A hymn of glory let us sing

A hymn of glory let us sing. Bede* (673/4-735), translated by Elizabeth Rundle Charles* (1828-1896). Charles's translation of Hymnum canamus gloriae* appeared in her The Voice of Christian Life in Song (1858), where it had six verses: A hymn of glory let us sing, New hymns throughout the world shall ring; By a new way none ever trod, Christ mounteth to the throne of God. The apostles on the mountain stand – The mystic mount – in Holy Land; They, with the Virgin-mother see Jesus...

Egbert Foster Horner

HORNER, Egbert Foster. b. Greenwich, London, 11 February 1864; d. Paddington, London, 8 October 1928. He was a pupil of Frederick Bridge* at the Royal College of Music. He taught harmony and counterpoint at Trinity College, London, where he was Director of Examinations (1917-27). He was also an external examiner for Durham and Birmingham Universities. He was organist of St Alphege's, Southwark (1884-86), of St Barnabas', Tunbridge Wells (1886-90), St John's Westminster (1890-1919), and Holy...

Thine arm, O Lord, in days of old

Thine arm, O Lord, in days of old. Edward Hayes Plumptre* (1821-1891). Plumptre was chaplain of King's College, London, from 1847 to 1868, and the hymn was written in June 1867 for use in the chapel of King's College Hospital. It was first published on a fly-sheet, and appeared in the Appendix (1868) to the First Edition of A&M. It was included in some editions of the author's Lazarus and other poems though not, as sometimes stated, the edition of 1865. Since then, it has become one of the...

O come and mourn with me awhile

O come and mourn with me awhile. Frederick William Faber* (1814-1863). First published in Faber's Jesus and Mary; or, Catholic Hymns for Singing and Reading (1849), with the title 'Jesus Crucified', and in his Hymns (1862). It had twelve stanzas. The First Edition of A&M printed a six-stanza text (stanzas 1, 2, 3, 5, 10 and 11). This version avoided the Roman Catholic opening, by changing stanza 1 lines 2 and 3 from 'See, Mary calls us to her side;/ O come, and let us mourn with her;' to...

Caribbean hymnody

When one examines the hymns or sung liturgical poetry that are current within the various island states geographically located between North and South America, one must conclude that Caribbean hymnody is an eclectic and a dynamic reality. The people of the region are a mixed entity. By virtue of history, they are the descendants of Amerindians (the original inhabitants) and migrants from Europe, Africa and Asia. Consequently, the Caribbean is often described as a melting pot of races and...

Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-Book

The Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-Book (ELHB 1912) was the first, official English-language hymnal of the Missouri Synod branch of American Lutheranism. It was published at a time when the Missouri Synod was slowly, and reluctantly, making the transition from German to English in its worship forms and ecclesial culture. As such, ELHB 1912 assisted in a far-reaching transformation of this immigrant, Lutheran church body by bringing a large portion of its German hymnody into English, while at the...

Harp (as a title)

  HARP (as a title). As early as 1795, hymn collections with Harp or Harfe in the title were published in the USA, without music, and thereafter, a number of tunebooks were published with 'Harp' in the title. The most widely-known Harp, as a collection of hymns, is The Sacred Harp*, by B. F. White* and Elisha J. King*. This usage of Harp probably started in connection with the Psalms of David, as in Dauids harpe ful of moost delectable armony, newely stringed and set in tune, by Theadore...

Jacopone da Todi

JACOPONE da Todi (BENEDETTI, Jacopo). b. Todi, Italy, ca. 1236; d. Collazzone, 25 December 1306. The Franciscan poet Jacopo Benedetti was born to a noble family. He signed his name Jacobus Benedicti de Tuderto; chroniclers refer to him as either Jacobus Tudertinus or Jacobus de Benedictis. The name Jacopone (something on the lines of 'Big Jim') may refer to his physical stature, for he was a tall man. More importantly, it was the common and, ironically, belittling name, unbefitting his...

Draw the circle wide

Draw the circle wide. Gordon S. Light* (1944- ).  Inclusive language for humankind and for God was a strong current in the tide of liturgical renewal among mainstream Canadian churches in the 1980s and 1990s. Anglican, Catholic, Presbyterian and United Churches responded to the call for new congregational song with collections that included not only strophic hymns new and revised, but also songs in many genres and languages from writers and composers around the globe. How seriously the hymnal...

Anne Brontë

BRONTË, Anne. b. Thornton, near Bradford, Yorkshire, 17 January 1820; d. Scarborough, Yorkshire, 28 May 1849. She was the youngest child of the Revd Patrick Brontë, a Church of England clergyman of Irish descent. There were five Brontë sisters (two of whom, Maria and Elizabeth, died at the Clergy Daughters' School, Cowan Bridge) and one brother, Branwell (1817-1848). The other surviving sisters were Charlotte (1816-1855) and Emily (1818-1848) (for Emily, see below). The family moved to Haworth,...

Sir Henry Wotton

WOTTON, (Sir) Henry.  b. Boughton Malherbe, near Maidstone, Kent, 1568, exact date not known; d. Eton College, December 1639. He was educated at Winchester School and New College, Oxford, before moving to Hart Hall (now Hertford College) and then to Queen's College (BA, 1588). From 1589 to 1594 he travelled widely in Europe, learning German and Italian, and studying in Geneva with a celebrated scholar, Isaac Casaubon (1559-1614). He became secretary to the earl of Essex in 1594, and in that...

The tree of life my soul hath seen

See 'Jesus Christ the Apple Tree'*

Behold, where in a mortal form

Behold, where in a mortal form. William Enfield (1741-1797). This hymn was first published in the Second Edition of Enfield's Selection of Hymns for Social Worship (1797). It was entitled 'The Example of Christ'. It appeared in some British books, such as Edward Bickersteth*'s Christian Psalmody (1833) and Andrew Reed*'s The Hymn Book, prepared from Dr. Watts's Psalms and Hymns, and other Authors (1842). Subsequently rather neglected in Britain, it became very popular in the USA until recent...

Aaron Crossley Hobart Seymour

SEYMOUR, Aaron Crossley Hobart. b. County Limerick, Ireland, 19 December 1789; d. Bristol, 22 October 1870. He was the son of a vicar of Caherelly in the diocese of Cashel, Co. Tipperary, and the brother of the anti-Catholic polemicist Michael Hobart Seymour (1800-74). He received most of his education at home, and was drawn in early life into the Calvinistic 'Connexion', founded by Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon* (to whom 'When Thou, my righteous judge, shall come' has been...

Baptized in water

Baptized in water. Michael Saward* (1932-2015). This was the second of three hymns for baptism written within four days, and the third of four used in a teaching series on the subject when the author was vicar of Ealing in West London. Like others, he had become concerned at the dearth of convincing and singable hymns for baptism. The date of writing this one was 29 May 1981; the following year all four were published in HFTC of which he was the words editor, together with two by Michael...

Face to face with Christ my Saviour

Face to face with Christ my Saviour. Carrie Breck* (1855-1934). This hymn is dated 1898 in hymnals. It is based on I Corinthians, 13:12.  First sung by the Gospel singer and publisher Grant Colfax Tullar (1869-1950) in front of the pulpit in First Presbyterian Church, Vineland, New Jersey (Conwell, 1916, p. 29). It appeared in Sermons in Song, no. 2 ,'For use in Gospel Meetings and other Religious Services', edited by Tullar and Isaac H. Meredith (Chicago: Tullar-Meredith Music Co., 1899). It...

Look, ye saints, the sight is glorious

Look, ye saints, the sight is glorious. Thomas Kelly* (1769-1855). First published in the Third Edition of Kelly's Hymns on Various Passages of Scripture (1809), with the title 'The Second Advent'. It refers to the return of Jesus Christ to heaven rather than to the second coming of Christ to earth. It is therefore often used for Ascension-tide. It is based on Revelation 7: 9-15, but was headed with a quotation from Revelation 11:15: 'And he shall reign for ever and ever': Look, ye saints!...

Church Army Mission Hymn Book

The Church Army Mission Hymn Book. This was published in Britain ca. 1960 (no date is given, and there is no indication in the very brief preface). It was a successor to Hymns for the Church Army (ca. 1894), edited by Wilson Carlile*, the army's founder, and Hymns and Choruses of the Church Army (n.d., but ca. 1910, and frequently reprinted). The front cover was embossed with the Church Army shield, a crown and crossed swords, and the words 'Fight the good fight'. The book contained 133 hymns,...

Sybil Farish Partridge

PARTRIDGE, Sybil Farish (Sister Mary Xavier (SMX)). b. London, ca. 1856; d. Birkdale, Southport, Lancashire, 23 February 1917. Sybil Partridge became a teaching nun of the order of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur at Liverpool. Her 'In Hymnis et Canticis': Verses Sacred and Profane (1903) was dedicated 'To the former students of the Liverpool Training College for whom most of these verses were written in memory of many happy years of work amongst them'. This statement, in conjunction with the...

Serbian hymnody

See also 'Byzantine hymnody'*, 'Byzantine rite'*, 'Greek hymnody'*, 'Rite of Constantinople'*, 'Rite of Jerusalem'*, 'Greek hymns, archaeology'*. From conversion to the 18th century The early years Serbia converted to Christianity between 867-74. The first contacts were with Latin Church priests in coastal areas dominated by the Byzantine Empire; later contacts were with the Slavic missionaries, the Thessalonian brothers Cyril and Methodius. St. Cyril reputedly created the Slavic script,...

John Chandler

CHANDLER, John. b. Witley, Godalming, Surrey, 16 June 1806; d. Putney, 1 July 1876. His father was the vicar of Witley. John was educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford (BA 1827, MA 1830). He took Holy Orders, becoming a Fellow of his College and curate of Witley. He succeeded his father as vicar of Witley in 1839, remaining there until his death. He is chiefly known for The Hymns of the Primitive Church: now first collected, translated, and arranged, published in 1837 (a later edition, with...

Richard Mant

MANT, Richard. b. Southampton, 12 February 1776; d. Ballymoney, Ireland, 2 November 1848. He was educated at Winchester College and Trinity College, Oxford (BA 1797, MA 1799). He became a Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford in 1801, and took Holy Orders (deacon 1802, priest 1803). After curacies, one assisting his father, he became vicar of Coggeshall, Essex (1810-13), chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury (1813-16), rector of St Botolph without Bishopsgate, London (1816-18), and rector of East...

Mirfield Mission Hymn Book

Mirfield Mission Hymn Book The Community of the Resurrection (CR) was founded in Oxford in 1892 by six priests, including Charles Gore, subsequently Bishop of Worcester, Birmingham and Oxford. It moved to Mirfield, West Yorkshire, in 1898. From the outset it combined a strong liturgical interest with a concern for the poor and needy, and it provided practical and spiritual help, notably in London. For much of the 20th century it also staffed missions in other countries, most significantly in...

Graham Kendrick

KENDRICK, Graham Andrew. b. Blisworth, Northamptonshire, 2 August 1950. He was the son of a Baptist minister; the family later moved to Essex and London. He started composing songs at 15 years of age, having taught himself to play the piano. In response to the Church's lack of connection with youth culture during the 1960s, he formed an early interest in the use of rock and folk music for outreach and evangelism. He trained as an English/Ceramics teacher at Avery Hill College, Kent, but...

Brief life is here our portion

Brief life is here our portion. Bernard of Cluny* (12th century), translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This is a translation of 'Hic breve vivitur, his breve plangitur, hic breve fletur', from the poem by Bernard of Cluny (or Morlaix), De Contemptu Mundi. That poem began 'Hora novissima, tempora pessima sunt, vigilemus'* (later translated by Neale as 'The world is very evil'*), but Neale first worked from an extract by Richard Chenevix Trench (in Sacred Latin Poetry, 1849) beginning...

Benjamin Francis

FRANCIS, Benjamin. b. Wales, 1734; d. Horsley, Gloucestershire, 14 December 1799. Francis was a Welsh speaker, who wrote hymns in Welsh and English, and edited a Welsh hymnbook (Aleluia: neu Hymnau perthynol I addoliad cyhoeddus, Caerfyrddin, 1774). JJ, p. 386, lists five hymns in Welsh that were in use in 1892. He trained at the Baptist College, Bristol, and served as a minister at Sodbury (Old Sodbury and Chipping Sodbury), Gloucestershire, and then, from 1757 to 1799, at Horsley, near...

Lord, that I may learn of thee

Lord, that I may learn of Thee. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). From Short Hymns on Select Passages of the Holy Scriptures (1762), on Isaiah 28.9: Whom shall he teach knowledge? and whom shall he make to understand doctrine? them that are weaned from the milk, and drawn from the breasts. It had four 4-line stanzas, in Charles Wesley's favourite 77.77 metre, which well suits the theme of simplicity. That simplicity, however, is part of the debate between reason and faith that was current in the...

Chinese Christian hymnody

Chinese Christian hymnody Introduction: the Beginnings The earliest Christian missionaries to China were Nestorians, who were active during the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Their version of Christianity (so-called Jieng Jiao, Luminous Religion) was received warmly by Emperor Taizong (唐太宗,599-649) and flourished throughout China. One hymn from this period, 'Wushang zhu tian shen jing tan' ('All heaven worships in great awe'), was probably composed by Nestorian missionaries and thought to have been...

Organs and hymnody, USA

The development of the organ as the primary vehicle for leading congregational song in churches of the USA proceeded initially from established English trajectories, although in subsequent centuries the organ's ecclesiastical role would parallel the development of the USA's musical, social, and liturgical priorities. The Anglican Church had maintained a complex and tenuous relationship with church music, its Calvinist concerns frequently commandeering the journey down the via media. Its noted...

Christ receiveth sinful men

See 'Sinners Jesus will receive'*.

Adam lay y-bounden

Adam lay y-bounden. English, ca. 1400, author unknown. This carol is found in the British Library Sloane MS 2593. It is thought to date from ca. 1400. It was printed in The Oxford Book of Carols (1928), with a tune by Peter Warlock (1894-1930). It has since become widely known through its inclusion in the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols* at King's College, Cambridge on Christmas Eve, when it normally follows the First Lesson, telling of the judgement of God on Adam and Eve and the serpent....

John W. Peterson

PETERSON, John Willard. b. Lindsborg, Kansas, 1 November 1921; d. Scottsdale, Arizona, 20 September 2006. A major influence in the development of gospel music, John W. Peterson, the youngest of seven children, began his music career by winning the grand prize of Major Bowes' (1874-1946) 'Original Amateur Hour', consisting of voice lessons and singing on a local radio station. After serving in World War II, he attended the Moody Bible Institute and was a member of the radio staff there for a...

Willard F. Jabusch

JABUSCH, Willard Francis. b. Chicago, Illinois, 12 March 1930; d. Chicago, 9 December 2018. Jabusch received BA, and STB degrees from St Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois, his MA from Loyola University, and a doctorate in speech from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois (1968). He studied music at the Chicago Conservatory and the University of London, and did additional studies in Germany, Israel, and Texas. A parish priest at St James' Roman Catholic Church in Chicago...

Cambridge Carol Book

The Cambridge Carol-Book was published in 1924 by SPCK (reprinted 1951). It was the work of George Ratcliffe Woodward* (words) and Charles Wood* (most of the music; occasional items were harmonized by GRW and one by George Herbert Palmer*). Its full title was The Cambridge Carol-Book, being fifty-two songs for Christmas, Easter, and other seasons. In fact it contained 53 songs, of which 34 were for Christmas-tide, including 'Ding! dong! merrily on high'* and 'Past three a clock, and a cold...

Malcolm David Archer

ARCHER, Malcolm David. b. Lytham-St-Annes, Lancashire, 29 April 1952. He was educated at King Edward VII School, Lytham, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He was Assistant Organist of Norwich Cathedral and Organist of Bristol and Wells Cathedrals before his appointment in 2004 as Organist and Director of Music at St Paul's Cathedral, a post he relinquished in 2007 to become Director of Chapel Music at Winchester College. In addition to his reputation as a fine trainer of choirs and as an editor of...

Lead, Holy Shepherd, lead us

Lead, Holy Shepherd, lead us. Hamilton Montgomerie MacGill* (1807-1880). This translation was included in the hymnbook of the United Presbyterian Church, The Presbyterian Hymnal (1877). The Church had been formed in 1847 through a union between the United Secession Church and the Synod of Relief (see 'Synod of Relief hymns'*). MacGill was one of the compilers of the 1877 hymnbook.  It was a translation of a hymn by Clement of Alexandria* (Titus Flavius Clemens, ca. 150- ca. 215), entitled...

Shepherds, in the field abiding

Shepherds, in the fields abiding.  George Ratcliffe Woodward* (1848-1934).  From Songs of Syon, Third Edition, revised and enlarged (1908), and reprinted in The Cowley Carol Book, Second Series (1919). It is based on a text from the Sarum Antiphoner, 'Quem vidistis, pastores'. It had four stanzas, presenting the story of the Incarnation through question, answer, and thanks: it has an affinity with other carols that feature the shepherds, notably 'Angels we have heard on high'*, from the French...

When Christ was born in Bethlehem

When Christ was born in Bethlehem. Laurence Housman* (1865-1959). This hymn for Holy Innocents' Day (28 December) was written for EH, and placed in that book under the heading 'At Catechism': When Christ was born in Bethlehem,  Fair peace on earth to bring,In lowly state of love he came  To be the children's King. A mother's heart was there his throne,  His orb a maiden's breast,Whereby he made through love alone  His kingdom manifest. And round him, then, a holy band  Of children blest was...

Edward Osler

OSLER, Edward. b. Falmouth, Cornwall, 30 January 1798; d. Falmouth, 7 March 1863. He was destined for a medical career, and was apprenticed to a Dr Carvosso at Falmouth, followed by training at Guy's Hospital, London (MRCS, 1818). He became a house surgeon at Swansea Infirmary, and surgeon to the House of Industry at Swansea (ca. 1819-25). During this period he developed an earlier interest in marine biology, published papers on the subject, and was elected a member of the Linnean Society. He...

Philippine hymnody

This entry is by Francisco F. Feliciano, apart from one section by Arnel de Pano Before the 20th Century Spain colonized the Philippines in the 16th century, and the Catholic faith with Latin liturgy was introduced to the Filipinos. For the next 400 years, the music of the liturgy was western: Gregorian chants, polyphonic masses and motets, and hymns in Latin. By the 20th century, the Latin liturgy, however, had proved inadequate to express the Catholic faith of the native Filipino....

Thomas Hansen Kingo

KINGO, Thomas Hansen. b. 15 December 1634; d. 14 October 1703. Born at Slangerup, North Zealand, Denmark, the son of a weaver. He attended the newly founded grammar-school at Frederiksborg from 1650 to 1654, and after four years at the University of Copenhagen he graduated in 1658 as Master of Theology. After some years as private tutor in West Zealand, he became chaplain in 1661 at Kirke Helsinge, also in West Zealand. In 1668 Kingo was appointed as priest in his native town of Slangerup, and...

Charles John Vincent

VINCENT, Charles John. b. Houghton-le-Spring, County Durham, 19 September 1852; d. Monte Carlo, 23 February 1934. He was the son of an organist, organ builder, and music seller; he was educated at Durham, as a chorister of the Cathedral. He studied under the Cathedral organist, Philip Armes*, and became organist of Monkwearmouth Parish Church at a young age (sixteen or seventeen, 1869). He undertook further study in Leipzig before becoming (1877) organist of Tavistock Parish Church, Devon, and...

Edward White Benson

BENSON, Edward White. b. Birmingham, 14 July 1829; d. Hawarden, Cheshire, 11 October 1896. He was from an old Yorkshire family, which had moved to Birmingham because his father was a chemical engineer. He was educated at King Edward's School, Birmingham (where he was a school friend of Joseph Barber Lightfoot, later Bishop of Durham) and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1852, MA 1853, ). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1854, priest 1857) and became a Fellow of the College. He taught at Rugby School...

I greet Thee, who my sure Redeemer art

I greet Thee, who my sure Redeemer art. French, possibly by Jean Calvin* (1509-1564), translated by Elizabeth Lee Smith* (1817-1898). This translation was published in Philip Schaff*'s Christ in Song (New York, 1869). It is a translation of the French text, 'Je Te salue, mon certain Rédempteur'*. Smith's translation follows the original metre. It is in eight stanzas, beginning, after stanza 1: Thou art the King of mercy and of grace Thou art the Life by which alone we live Thou art the...

To us a child of royal birth

To us a child of royal birth. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788).  This hymn, entitled 'The Incarnation of Christ', was not published in Charles Wesley's lifetime. It was found in a manuscript entitled 'Hymns on the Four Gospels', and was first printed in the 1830 Supplement to John Wesley*'s A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780). It remained in subsequent British Methodist books until it was inexplicably dropped by HP in 1983. It has four stanzas:  To us a child...

Alexander MacMillan

MacMILLAN, Alexander. b. Edinburgh, 19 October 1864; d. Toronto, 5 May 1961. Born and educated in Edinburgh, Alexander MacMillan moved to Canada following his graduation from the University of Edinburgh, licensed by the United Presbyterian Presbytery of Edinburgh in June, 1887. He described what happened when he was a student: While a student in the faculty of Arts in Edinburgh University, and in the Divinity Hall, Edinburgh, I felt a gradual and growing desire to make Canada the sphere of my...

Craft of writing hymn texts

Many in the late 20th- and early 21st-century church music community have been guided by Erik Routley*'s summary of what constitutes a good hymn, i.e., one which is 'well written, well chosen and well sung (1959, p. 299). As compelling and compact as this definition is, when it is quoted outside of Routley's expansive view of the purpose and nature of hymnody, it can become a convenient way to canonize the personal aesthetic of the one employing the quotation. What is 'good' can be easily...

Indian Christian hymnody

The beginning of Christianity in India is ascribed to the arrival of St Thomas—one of the twelve disciples of Jesus Christ—in the Southern part of India during the first century of the Common Era. Even though such an ascription is contested in some scholarly circles, it is certain that the Eastern Orthodox tradition of Christian faith was in existence in India quite early in the Common Era. The Indian Orthodox Church, Orthodox Syrian Church of the East, Armenian Apostolic Church, Chaldean...

Johannes Hesse

HESSE, Johannes. b. Nürnberg, September 1490; d. Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland), 6 January 1547. He was educated at the Universities of Leipzig and Wittenberg (MA 1511), and then in Italy (Bologna and Ferrara, DD Ferrara, 1519). In 1520 he was ordained as a priest, and was Provost of the Church of St Mary and St George at Oels; he became a Protestant in 1523, and was appointed pastor of the Church of St Mary Magdalene at Breslau (Wroclaw). He is thought to be the author of 'O Welt, ich muss dich...

Come, let us with our Lord arise

Come, let us with our Lord arise. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns for Children (1763), entitled 'For the Lord's Day', in four 6-line verses. The hymn was not included in A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), but it appeared in the later edition known as 'Wesley's Hymns' (1876), in MHB and in HP. It has also been used in a number of Anglican and Free Church hymnbooks, including CP and A&MCP. The full original text, which has rarely...

There's a sweet and blessèd story

There's a sweet and blessèd story. Julia H. Johnston* (1849-1919). Apart from 'Marvelous grace of our loving Lord'*, this is Julia Johnston' best known hymn. Entitled 'He Ransomed Me', and dated 1916, it still bears the marks of her earlier engagement with the Torrey-Alexander evangelistic campaigns, with their concentration on individual salvation ('to rescue me'). The refrain breaks the mould with its unexpected reference to the 'miry clay', from Psalm 40: 2 ('He brought me up…out of the...

Murray's Hymnal

A Hymnal, for use in the English Church (1852). This is the title of the hymnbook edited by Francis H. Murray* which was one of the notable fore-runners of A&M. It was published in 1852. By 1869 it had reached its thirteenth edition. Although it is always attributed to Murray, the preface speaks of 'the compilers', because Murray was assisted by his curate, Christopher Harrison. The preface states that it was 'first undertaken with a view to supply the wants of a particular Parish' (p....

Augustinian canon

The term 'Augustinian canon regular' is used to refer to the clergy of a wide range of religious establishments in the Middle Ages. From the late 11th century onwards the Rule of St Augustine of Hippo* was adopted widely by congregations of clergy who wished to live communally in the manner of the Apostles. Houses of canons subscribing to St Augustine's Rule were founded across the whole of Europe, covering the continent from Poland to Spain and from Scandinavia to Italy (Dickinson, 1950, p....

Mozarabic Liturgy

This is the name given to the liturgy used by Christians in the Iberian peninsula living under the rule of the moors before the reconquest of Spain. Because it was in use before the coming of the Arabs, the designation 'Mozarabic' tends to be avoided by modern scholars; 'Old Hispanic' is usually preferred. This liturgical rite was superseded, not without resistance, when the Roman liturgy was imposed on Spain by order of the Council of Burgos in 1080. It remained in use in some Toledan parish...

James Allen

ALLEN, James. b. Gayle, Wensleydale, Yorkshire, 24 June 1734; d. Gayle, 31 Oct 1804. He was educated privately, and then briefly at St John's College, Cambridge, with a view to taking Holy Orders; but he left Cambridge in 1752 to become a follower of Benjamin Ingham*, the Yorkshire evangelist. He is known to hymnody as the co-editor with Christopher Batty (1715-1797, JJ, p. 118) of the Inghamite Collection of Hymns for the Use of Those that Seek, and Those that have Redemption in the Blood of...

Olney Hymns

Olney Hymns Olney is a small town in Buckinghamshire, England. In the 18th century the principal occupation of the inhabitants was lace-making (see, for example, Eliza Westbury*). To Olney came John Newton* as curate-in-charge in 1764. In the same year he had published An Authentic Narrative of some Remarkable and Interesting Particulars in the Life of --------, a book which detailed his remarkable early life and his religious conversion. He rapidly became well known among evangelicals, and in...

William Wadé Harris

HARRIS, William Wadé. b. 1860 (?); d. 1929. Born in Liberia, Harris joined the Methodist Church at age twelve, although he subsequently worked as a teacher for the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was an early advocate of independence from the Americo-Liberian colonial rule, and was arrested for treason and twice imprisoned by the administration in Liberia over a two-year period, 1909-1910. During his second imprisonment he had a vision of the Archangel Gabriel, who declared him a prophet sent...

Now that the Day-star doth arise

Now that the Day-star doth arise. Latin, perhaps 5th century, translated by John Cosin* (1595-1672). This is Cosin's translation of 'Iam lucis orto sidere'*, the traditional hymn for Prime in Monastic Uses. According to The Hymnal 1940 Companion, p. 117, it took the place of the corresponding hymn in the Benedictine tradition (see 'Rule of Benedict*). It was printed in Cosin's A Collection of Private Devotions in the Practice of the Ancient Church (1627), as a hymn for Morning Prayer: Now...

Te decet laus

Te decet laus. A short prose hymn, called a '[canticle]'* in some early sources, and having the form of a doxology*: 'Te decet laus, te decet hymnus, tibi gloria Deo Patri et Filio, cum Sancto Spiritu, in saecula saeculorum. Amen' ('Honour is yours, praise is yours, to you be glory, God the Father and Son, with the Holy Spirit, for ever and ever. Amen'). It appears in the 4th-century Apostolic Constitutions; the Latin version was in existence by the 6th century, when it was prescribed for use...

Latin hymns

Latin hymns The entry on 'Latin Hymnody' in JJ notes at the outset that 'a complete history of Latin Hymnody has never been written. It would occupy a considerable volume' (p. 640). Since that time much work has been done on the subject, beginning with James Mearns*'s Early Latin Hymnaries (Cambridge, 1913). Mearns deserves more than a passing note, for he was John Julian's ever-reliable and extremely learned assistant, responsible for many of the Latin entries in the Dictionary of Hymnology,...

Roman Catholic hymnody, USA

Post-Colonial Era Both the body of hymnody from and the publication of hymnals for the Roman Catholic Church in the United States at its founding and in the decades immediately following are quite small. The cause of this is two-fold: the inherited status of Roman Catholics under British governance and the role of the congregation at the Catholic Mass. Until the Catholic Relief Act of 1778, Catholics in the colonies lived under the same rules of suppression as they did in England. Public...

Hark! ten thousand voices cry

Hark ten thousand voices cry. Thomas Kelly* (1769-1855). According to JJ, p. 488, this was first published in Hymns on Various Passages of Scripture (Second Edition, Dublin, 1806). It was prefaced by the heading: 'Death is swallowed up in victory. 1 Cor.xv. 54.' Unusually, the first stanza is in a different metre from the other three: it rhymes AABB and is in the metre of 77.77., whereas the other three are in 8.7.8.7. In the 1820 edition the text was as follows: Hark ten thousand voices cry...

Marian hymns

Marian hymns Hymns in honour of the Virgin Mary are chiefly associated with the Eastern Orthodox churches and the Roman Catholic church; Marian devotion is accepted less in the protestant traditions, although some Anglican books are rich in hymns for Marian feasts. The earliest Marian feast is the Assumption (August 15), which commemorates her death. This dates back to the mid-5th century, around the time of the Council of Ephesus (431) at which it was decreed that Mary was the mother of God...

Ottiwell Heginbothom

HEGINBOTHOM, Ottiwell. b. 1744; d. 1768. JJ notes that he was for a short time pastor of a nonconformist congregation at Sudbury, Suffolk, where some of the congregation left and built another chapel. This 'so preyed upon his mind, and affected his health, that his pastorate terminated with his death within three years of his appointment' (p. 506). Samuel Willoughby Duffield, writing before JJ, suggests that he may have been the son of another Ottiwell Heginbothom mentioned in The Life and...

John Cennick

CENNICK, John. b. Reading, Berkshire, 12 December 1718; d. London, 4 July 1755. On one side of the family his grandparents had been Quakers, persecuted for their beliefs, but his parents were members of the Church of England. He was educated at Reading, and brought up strictly, 'kept constant to daily Prayers', and subsequently went through a period of depression as a young man. He was trained as a shoemaker. He had an experience of salvation in 7 September 1737, and sought out the Methodists...

Howard Charles Adie Gaunt

GAUNT, Howard Charles Adie. b. Birmingham, 13 November 1902; d. Winchester, 1 February 1983. He was educated at King's College, Cambridge (BA, 1925, MA, 1927). He worked as a schoolmaster for much of his life, teaching at Rugby School, Malvern College, and Winchester College. He took Holy Orders (deacon 1954, priest 1955) and served in the Winchester diocese, continuing to teach at Winchester College until 1963, when he became, successively, Sacristan (1963-66) and Precentor (1966-73) of...

The sands of time are sinking

The sands of time are sinking. Anne Ross Cousin* (1824-1906). Written at Irvine, Ayrshire, in 1854, and first published in The Christian Treasury (1857). It was headed 'The Last Words of Samuel Rutherford'. These words were 'Glory — glory dwelleth in Immanuel's land', referring to the dying words of the Scottish Covenanter, Samuel Rutherford (1600-61). Rutherford's words gave Cousin the last two lines of each stanza. It also gave her the title for her book of poems, by 'A.R.C.', Immanuel's...

Too early for the blackbird

Too early for the blackbird. Caryl Micklem* (1925-2003). Written sometime before 1991 for RS, to provide a hymn for Eastertide suitable for all-age worship. It tells the story with an attractive simplicity in the verses, counterpointed by a fine complexity in the refrain: Chase, chase your gloom and grief away  and welcome hope instead,for Jesus Christ is ris'n today  and death itself is dead. The Companion to RS (1999), p. 320, notes debts in the refrain to Philip Doddridge*, 'Ye humble...

Mennonite hymnody in English

Mennonite hymnody is defined here as hymns that Mennonites sing and the manner in which they sing them, and confined to hymns in English. It should be noted, however, that this does not give a complete picture of Mennonite hymnody worldwide, given the fact that at the beginning of the 20th century 98% of Mennonites lived in Europe or North America; whereas at the beginning of the 21st century 60% live in Asia, Africa and Latin America (see Janecek, 2005). Of the remaining 40%, a small minority...

African hymnody

African hymnody. In this article, African hymnody will be considered under the headings 'Western Africa', 'Eastern Africa' and 'Southern Africa', preceded by a general introduction. Articles on individual countries and authors/composers will be found as separate entries. Introduction 'Music might be considered as one of the best ways to educate Christian people. A beautiful hymn, well understood and lived, has the value of a good sermon' (Ntahokaja, 75). In this quotation, Father Ntahokaja...

Margaret Wells Allison

ALLISON, Margaret Wells. b. McCormick, South Caroline, 25 September 1921; d. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 30 July 2008. Allison is primarily recognized as the founder and leader of the Angelic Gospel Singers, a gospel ensemble she directed for over fifty years. Known as 'Babe', 'she was the eldest living female gospel artist still traveling and performing' at the time of her death at 86 years of age (Manovich, 2008, n.p.).  From South Carolina she moved to Philadelphia when she was four. It was...

Christian popular music, USA

Christian popular music, USA Introduction and antecedents Christian popular music (hereafter CPM) is an umbrella category for a sonically diverse repertoire of late 20th- and early 21st-century evangelical Protestant commercial popular music. It encompasses several distinct subcategories based on musical genre, industrial context, or function, including, but not limited to, Jesus Music, Contemporary Christian Music (CCM), Praise & Worship music, and Christian rock. CPM is characterized by...

Australian hymnbooks

Although this account focuses on five 20th-century Australian hymnals, Australia's history of hymn publication extends back to 1821 and has involved the Roman Catholic and major protestant traditions, and others including the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, Salvation Army, Churches of Christ, Reformed Church and various Pentecostal groups (see 'Australian hymnody'*). Of the hymnals discussed here, two in particular represent the force of ecumenism in Australian since the 1960s; the others reflect...

Camp meeting hymns and songs, USA

Camp Meeting Hymns and Songs, USA Since the publication of George Pullen Jackson*'s groundbreaking and provocative White Spirituals from the Southern Uplands (Chapel Hill, 1933), a considerable body of hymnological and musicological literature has accumulated on the folk hymnody of early America. In much of that secondary literature it is presupposed that a key component of this hymnic corpus is the camp-meeting 'chorus'. This sub-genre is typically constructed from wandering rhyme pairs or...

Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?

See 'Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power'*.

Etta Campbell

See 'Jesus of Nazareth passeth by'*

Moment by moment I'm kept in His love

See 'Dying with Jesus, by death reckoned mine'*.

O Thron'd, O Crown'd with all renown

See 'O Jesus, crowned with all renown'*.

Aeterne rerum conditor

Aeterne rerum conditor. Ambrose of Milan* (339/340-397). This hymn is accepted as the work of St Ambrose. It is mentioned as one of Ambrose's hymns by Augustine of Hippo* and Bede* (see JJ, p. 26). Its use was widespread. It is found as the matins/nocturns hymn in the Old Hymnal and Frankish Hymnal (rarely), and as the hymn for Sunday Lauds in winter in the New Hymnal (see Medieval hymns and hymnals*). It continued in use throughout the Middle Ages in the various regional practices of the Roman...

Charles Hutchinson Gabriel

GABRIEL, Charles Hutchinson. b. Wilton, Ohio, 18 August 1856; d. Hollywood, California, 15 September 1932. Following in his father's footsteps, Charles Gabriel became a singing school teacher at age 16, and after 1887 served as music director in the Grace Methodist Church in San Francisco. He settled in Chicago, the center for evangelical and revivalist publishing, in 1892, where he devoted the rest of his life to writing, composing, editing, and publishing. A list of his works includes over...

Christ is alive! Let Christians sing

Christ is alive! Let Christians sing. Brian Arthur Wren* (1936- ). Written in April 1968, to be sung on Easter Day, ten days after the assassination of Martin Luther King: 'The hymn tried to express an Easter hope out of that terrible event, in words which could hopefully be more widely applied' (Faith Renewed, 1995, note to hymn 1). It was revised three times (1978, 1988-89, 1993). The first revision removed the 'he/man' images ('His cross stands empty to the sky') and the original imagery...

Nearer, still nearer, close to Thy heart

Nearer, still nearer, close to Thy heart.  Lelia Morris* (1862-1929).  The text and tune were both written by Morris. According to Donald P. Hustad* (1978), the hymn was published in Pentecostal Praises (1898), edited by William J. Kirkpatrick* and H.L. Gilmour. It had four stanzas: Nearer, still nearer, close to Thy heart, Draw me, my Saviour, so precious Thou art; Fold me, O fold me, close to Thy breast, Shelter me safe in that 'Haven of Rest,' Shelter me safe in that 'Haven of...

Would you be free from your burden of sin (Power in the blood).

Would you be free from your burden of sin (Power in the blood). Lewis Edgar Jones* (1865-1936). First published in Songs of Praise and Victory (Philadelphia, 1899), compiled by William J. Kirkpatrick* and Henry L. Gilmour (1836-1920), after Gilmour purchased the manuscript from the author. It appeared the same year in Gospel Praises (Philadelphia, 1899), compiled by Kirkpatrick, Gilmour, and J. L. Hall. According to correspondence provided by the author/composer near the end of his life, Jones...

They come from the east and west

They come from the east and west. Thoro Harris* (1874–1955). This gospel hymn, 'They Come', first appeared in Harris' convention collection Revival Praise: Erikson Campaign Special (Chicago, 1917), where he is listed as the translator of a German text. The first musical score available in Hymnary.org is in Soul Inspiring Songs (1929), edited by R.E. Winsett (1876–1952), with the tune by Russell DeKoven, Harris's pseudonym. This collection indicates that the text is Harris' translation of 'Sie...

Angels we have heard on high

Angels we have heard on high. French traditional carol, translated by James Chadwick* (1813-1882). The French carol, in eight stanzas, is printed in the New Oxford Book of Carols (1992), to which this entry is greatly indebted. The original text seems to have been in dialogue form, and the editors of NOBC have arranged it for singing by the Shepherds ('Bergers', stanzas 1, 3, 6) and the Women ('Femmes de Bethlehem', stanzas 2, 4 and 7). Stanzas 5 and 8 were sung by all ('Tous'): 'Les anges...

The Lord is my shepherd ('We Will Walk Through the Valley')

The Lord is my shepherd ('We Will Walk Through the Valley'). Lucie Eddie Campbell-Williams* (1885-1963).  This is one of four songs composed by Campbell in 1919 at the very beginning of her song-writing career. Two songs were secular compositions; the other was a sacred composition, that became well-known, 'Preachers and teachers would make their appeal*. It is not clear when 'The Lord is my shepherd' was first sung, but it may have been at the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc. annual...

Arthur Henry Mann

MANN, Arthur Henry. b. Norwich, 16 May 1850; d. Cambridge, 19 November 1929. He was a chorister at Norwich Cathedral and then an articled pupil of Zechariah Buck. He held the positions of organist at St Peter's Church, Wolverhampton (1870), Tettenhall Parish Church (1871) and Beverley Minster (1875) before he was appointed organist of King's College, Cambridge in 1876. He remained in this post for the rest of his life. Mann did much for Cambridge music. He oversaw the change of regime in which...

Abraham Maxim

MAXIM, Abraham. b. Carver, Maine, 3 January 1773; d. Palmyra, Maine, 28 March 1829. He was a composer and singing master, best known for his collection, The Northern Harmony. Abraham Maxim was the son of John Maxim (1745-1827) and Martha Norris Maxim (1750-1813). He married Anna Merrill (1780-1876) on 11 September 1801 in Turner, Maine, and the couple had seven children.  In a biographical sketch of Abraham Maxim, S. P. Cheney wrote in 1878 that he had received two sources of information. One...

Iesu dulcis memoria

Iesu dulcis memoria. Latin, 12th century, author unknown. This hymn is given in Daniel, Thesaurus Hymnologicus I. 227-9, as the work of St Bernard of Clairvaux*, but more recent research has noted that the earliest manuscripts containing it are of English origin, and it has been tentatively ascribed to an English monk of the 12th century (see F. J. E. Raby, 'The Poem “Dulcis Iesu Memoria”', Bulletin of the Hymn Society, 33 (October 1945), pp. 1-6, and Maurice Frost, Historical Companion to...

James Cleveland

CLEVELAND, James. b. Chicago, Illinois, 5 December 1931; d. Los Angeles, California, 9 February 1991. Singer, composer, pianist, choir director, recording artist, James Cleveland is regarded as the single most important figure in African-American gospel music in the 20th century. As a young boy, Cleveland sang in the choir of Chicago's Pilgrim Baptist Church, where the ministers of music were Thomas A. Dorsey* who in 1930 had introduced the church to his 'gospel blues', and Roberta Martin...

Light of the lonely pilgrim's heart

Light of the lonely pilgrim's heart. Edward Denny* (1796-1889). First published in the Plymouth Brethren collection edited by James George Deck*, Psalms and Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1847), and then in Denny's Hymns and Poems (1848), where it was entitled 'The heart watching for the morning', and preceded by a quotation from Cowper*'s The Task (Book VI, 861-3): Thy saints proclaim thee King: and in their hearts Thy title is engraven with a pen Dipp'd in the fountain of eternal love. It...

Plainchant

Plainchant, also known as plainsong. The term is taken from the Latin cantus planus, and is usually associated with the Latin chant of the Western Church. It has a wide stylistic remit, from simple psalm recitation sung by the whole monastic community to virtuosic solo and choral chants such as offertories. All plainchant is monophonic — that is, it consists of an unharmonized line of melody. 'Plainchant' also encompasses a wide chronological range, from the core repertory of Office and Mass...

Bentley D. Ackley

ACKLEY, Bentley D. b. Bradford, Pennsylvania, 27 September 1872; d. Winona Lake, Indiana, 3 September 1958. Rising to prominence as pianist for the Billy Sunday and Homer A. Rodeheaver* revival meetings, B. D. Ackley became a prolific composer of gospel songs and editor of gospel hymnals. He was born into a family of musicians in Bradford, Pennsylvania, including his younger brother Alfred Ackley*, who also became a gospel song composer. Their father, Stanley Ackley, served as a Methodist...

J.R. Watson

WATSON, John Richard. b. Ipswich, Suffolk, 15 June 1934. Richard Watson was educated at Magdalen College School, Oxford and (after a National Service commission in the Royal Artillery) at Magdalen College, Oxford (BA 1958, MA 1964; Matthew Arnold Memorial Prize, 1962). After two years as a teacher of English at Loretto School near Edinburgh, he became a post-graduate student at the University of Glasgow, gaining his PhD (1966) with a study of William Wordsworth. He was lecturer in the English...

F. Bland Tucker

TUCKER, Francis Bland. b. Norfolk, Virginia, 6 January 1895; d. Savannah, Georgia, 1 January 1984. The son of an Episcopalian Church bishop, he was educated at school in Lynchburg, Virginia, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville (BA 1914). After service with the Medical Corps in World War I, he trained for the priesthood at Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria (BD, 1920, h. c. DD, 1942). He was ordained (deacon 1918, priest 1920), serving parishes at Brunswick County, Virginia...

Rite of Jerusalem

The liturgical rite of Jerusalem, as the name indicates, developed and was practised primarily in the Holy City itself. The physical and organising centre of this rite was the Cathedral of Jerusalem, a complex of churches built around the cross and the tomb of Christ. Festal offices were celebrated in the Martyrium basilica (or other churches of the city) and daily offices in the Anastasis rotonda (the Church of the Resurrection, also called the Church of the Holy Sepulchre). In addition,...

Joshua Spalding

SPALDING, Joshua. b. Killingly, Connecticut, 14 December 1760; d. Newburgh, New York State, 26 September 1825. According to the Douglas Family Records (see below) Spalding, whose name is sometimes spelt 'Spaulding', studied theology with the Rev Mr Bradford, of Rowley, Massachusetts. In 1785 he was ordained 'over the church and society' of the Tabernacle church, Salem, Massachusetts, where he was remembered as 'an energetic pastor', so that 'the drooping interests of the church and society...

Shackled by a heavy burden (He touched me)

Shackled by a heavy burden (He touched me). Bill Gaither* (1936- ) and Gloria Gaither* (1942- ).  Known primarily by its refrain, 'He touched me' was composed in 1963 soon after the couple's wedding in 1962. While not their first song, 'He touched me' was the first of several early songs that defined their career, including 'Because he lives' (1971), 'Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, there's just something about that name' (1970), and 'The King is coming' (1970). Though the songs were recorded by many...

Vespers

Vespers was traditionally celebrated at dusk. As with all of the medieval offices, it included a hymn; unlike those of other offices, Vespers hymns began to be sung polyphonically on important feast days in major liturgical centres in the fifteenth century (see Polyphonic hymns to 1600*). The Divine Office was a focus for musical creativity throughout the middle ages (see Saints' Offices*), and the other Offices (Matins, Lauds, Compline, Prime, Terce, Sext and None) followed broadly similar...

Finnish hymns and hymnals

Hymns before hymnals Although archaeological evidence suggests that some form of Christanity may have existed earlier, the Christian Church was brought to Finland in 1155 by the English-born Henry, Bishop of Uppsala, Sweden, together with King (Saint) Erik of Sweden. Henry, the 'apostle to Finland', met an untimely end when he was murdered by a peasant, Lalli, on an icy lake. Amazing tales began to circulate about Henry and he was later canonized. Antiphons, hymns and sequences* were written...

Hosanna

This is the English rendering of the Greek ώσαννα, which in turn comes from the Aramaic hôš '-nā, from the Hebrew for 'Save us!' (Psalm 118: 25). In the Christian tradition it is particularly associated with Christ's Entry into Jerusalem (Mark 11: 10, Matthew 21: 9, 15, John 12: 13), and in the liturgical tradition it is linked to the 'Benedictus qui venit in nomine Deus', 'Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord'. In hymn writing it was particularly associated with the voices of...

Alison Robertson

 ROBERTSON, Alison Margaret (née Malloch). b. Glasgow, 22 February 1940. She was the younger twin of the Revd. Jack and Nancy Malloch.  In 1948 the family moved to the Gold Coast (now Ghana), when her father became a Church of Scotland missionary principal of the Teacher Training College at Akropong. Her mother ran a baby clinic once a week and Alison, at the age of 10, was made responsible for the small wounds part of the clinic, cleaning and dressing fresh and infected wounds sustained by the...

Henry Francis Lyte

LYTE, Henry Francis. b. Ednam, near Kelso, Roxburghshire, 1 June 1793; d. Nice, France, 20 November 1847. He was the son of an army officer, whose military career necessitated frequent moves, through Scotland, England, and, finally, to Ireland. He was educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen (where he began to compose poetry), then, from 1811, at Trinity College, Dublin, where he won a university scholarship, and the Chancellor's prize for English verse in three successive years. He...

O brothers, lift your voices

O brothers, lift your voices. Edward Henry Bickersteth* (1825-1906).  The Church Missionary Society was founded in 1799. This hymn was written in 1848, the year in which Bickersteth was ordained as a deacon, to celebrate the Jubilee of the Society in 1849. It was published in the Church Missionary Society Jubilee Tracts (1848). In the following year Bickersteth published Poems, by Edward Henry Bickersteth, curate of Banningham, Norfolk (Cambridge: Macmillan, Barclay, and Macmillan; London:...

Sound of living waters

Sound of Living Waters  Sound of Living Waters was published in 1974 in London by Hodder & Stoughton and in the USA by Eerdmans (Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1974), edited by Betty Pulkingham* and Jeanne Harper. It had a bright cover, and was ring-bound, making it one of the earliest books to break free from the traditional style and format. Sub-titled Songs of Renewal, it contained 133 items, arranged in sections, as follows: Hallelujah!... Songs of praise and thanksgiving Kneel and Adore…...

Francis Xavier

XAVIER, Francis. b. Xavier, Navarre, Spain, 7 April 1506; d. Shang Chuan, near China, 3 December 1552. He was born Francisco de Jasso y Azpilicueta in a new castle ('Xavier' in the Basque language) belonging to his aristocratic family in the kingdom of Navarre: the kingdom was invaded and divided during his youth, and the castle was reduced in size by the order of Cardinal Cisneros (see 'Spanish hymnody'*). He was educated at the Collège Sainte Barbe in Paris (1525- ), where he met Ignatius...

It is finished! Christ hath known

'It is finished!' Christ hath known. George Gabriel Scott Gillett* (1873-1948). Based on St John's record of the last words of Jesus on the cross — 'tetelestai' ('it is finished') — this hymn was written for EH (1906). These dying words of Christ have inspired and challenged many hymn writers. Gillett's solution was in an ABBA form, that of Tennyson*'s In Memoriam, followed by four lines rhyming ABAB: It is finished! Christ hath knownAll the life of men wayfaring;Human joys and sorrows...

Majesty, worship his majesty

Majesty, worship his majesty. Jack Hayford* (1934- ). This 10-line song is said to be the result of an experience while travelling in Great Britain in 1977. Hayford was struck by the architecture of some of the great buildings, and also fascinated by their associations with the Royal Family. He is said to have begun this eight-line song after visiting Blenheim Palace, Woodstock: he was intending to relate the earthly splendour that he had found with the kingly magnificence of God, 'king of all...

Who is he, in yonder stall

Who is he, in yonder stall. Benjamin R. Hanby* (1833-1867). Written in 1866, not long before Hanby's death in the following year. It was first published in The Dove, a Collection of Music for Day and Sunday Schools, Juvenile Singing Classes, and the Social Circle (Chicago, 1866), where it had eight two-phrase stanzas. It was then included in The Amaranth (1872), the first authorized Sunday-school book of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Two stanzas were added when it was published in Ira...

Benedictus

This is the first word of the phrase 'Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini', used in the Mass in the Sanctus* (from Mark 11:9 and Luke 13: 35). It is also the opening of the song of Zachariah (or Zacharias), Luke 1: 68-79: 'Benedictus Deus Israhel quia visitavit et fecit redemptionem plebi suae'. Zachariah has been struck dumb by the encounter with the angel Gabriel, who tells him that his elderly wife Elisabeth will conceive and bear a son, John the Baptist. Zachariah is punished for being...

Arthur Tozer Russell

RUSSELL, Arthur Tozer. b. Northampton, 20 March 1806; d. Southwick, Sussex, 18 November 1874. He was the son of a Congregationalist minister named Clout who changed his name to Russell. He was educated at Merchant Taylors' School, London, Manchester College, York (a Dissenting Academy, in York from 1803 to 1840), and St John's College, Cambridge. He became a member of the Church of England and took Holy Orders (deacon 1827, priest 1830). He was successively vicar of Caxton, Huntingdonshire...

I danced in the morning when the world was begun

I danced in the morning when the world was begun. Sydney Carter* (1915-2004). This is frequently known as 'Lord of the dance'. In the notes on his hymns the author emphasizes that they grow and coalesce over time into a version that can be published. There seems to be no evidence of when Carter started to sing this song. It was, however, sufficiently well known for the first four verses to appear in Student Christian Congress Hymns (Bristol, 1963). In his collection 9 Carols or Ballads (London,...

Lewis Edgar Jones

JONES, Lewis Edgar. b. Yates City, Illinois, 8 February 1865; d. Santa Barbara, California, 1 September 1936. Born in Illinois, Jones moved with his parents to Iowa, where he lived on a farm until he was 21. After working in business for a time, he sought training at Moody Bible Institute (Chicago) where he graduated in the same class as evangelist Billy Sunday (1862-1935). Jones was active in the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) for 36 years, serving as physical director of the YMCA at...

Ralph Carmichael

CARMICHAEL, Ralph. b. Quincy, Illinois, 28 May 1927; d. Carmillo, California, 18 October 2021. A pioneer in the Contemporary Christian Music industry, Carmichael is a prolific composer of Christian songs, whose experiments in popular musical styles have garnered him recognition by some as the 'Father of Contemporary Christian Music'. Carmichael, fostered by musician parents, early on took violin, trumpet, and piano lessons. He attended Southern California Bible College (now Vanguard University,...

John Pecham

PECHAM, John (Johannes de Pescham, Peccanus, Pischano, Pisano, Pithyano). b. Patcham, Sussex, ca. 1230; d. Mortlake, Surrey, 8 December 1292. After receiving his early education at the Cluniac Priory at Lewes, John Pecham joined the Order of Friars Minor in Oxford ca. 1250. Pecham studied the liberal arts at Oxford and then, some time between 1257 and 1259, travelled to Paris, where he completed his studies in theology. He served as Franciscan lector and regent master of theology there from...

To thy temple I repair

To Thy temple I repair. James Montgomery* (1771-1854). First published in William Bengo Collyer*'s Hymns partly collected and partly original, intended as a Supplement to Dr Watts's Psalms and Hymns (1812), with the title 'A Sabbath Hymn'. It was published again in Thomas Cotterill*'s Selection of Psalms and Hymns (Eighth Edition, 1819), and in Montgomery's own The Christian Psalmist (Glasgow, 1825), where it was headed 'A day in the courts of the Lord' (the reference is to Psalm 84: 10: 'For...

William Enfield

ENFIELD, William.  b. Sudbury, Suffolk, 29 March 1741; d. Norwich, 3 November 1797. Enfield came from a poor family, but was encouraged and taught by the local minister, William Hextal (or Hextall), who secured his entry to a Dissenting Academy at Daventry. He became pastor of a Presbyterian chapel at Liverpool (1763-70), and then at Warrington (1770-85), where he taught belles-lettres at the celebrated Warrington Academy. He was minister of the Octagon Chapel, Norwich (then still Presbyterian,...

Henry Sloane Coffin

COFFIN, Henry Sloane, b. New York City, 5 January 1877; d. Lakeville, Connecticut, 25 November 1954. Coffin was educated at Yale University (BA, 1897; MA, 1900) and Union Theological Seminary, New York City (BD 1900). He also studied Theology at New College, Edinburgh, immediately after his undergraduate education, followed by a brief period at the University of Marburg, Germany. He was ordained a Presbyterian pastor in 1900 and served churches in New York City, notably serving as the pastor of...

Vicente Mendoza

MENDOZA, Vicente Polanco. b. Guadalajara, Mexico, 24 December 1875; d. Mexico City, 14 June 1955. Methodist evangelist, hymn writer, and translator, he was acclaimed by many as the leading evangelist in Mexican Methodism of his generation, and the author of some of the most beloved hymns from this era in the Spanish language. Vicente P. Mendoza should not be confused with two others of his generation with a similar name: Vicente T. Mendoza (1894-1964), a Mexican Methodist musicologist,...

Unison hymn tune in Britain, 1861-1939

  Unison hymn tune in Britain, 1861-1939. 1. Victorian hymn tunes in the late 19th Century.  One of the principal features that a student of 19th-century and early 20th-century music has learned about the hymnody of this period in Britain is its transformation from a legacy of the Old Version* and the New Version*. John Stainer* noted that the OV and NV tunes that were still in use at St Paul's Cathedral in the late 1840s were 'groaned through' with commensurate reluctance by choir and...

Syriac hymnody (Western church)

History of the Syrian Church Syriac Christianity has grown out of the Aramaic speaking population of Mesopotamia and its environs which, around the beginning of the Christian Era, was divided into two empires: the Roman-Byzantine Empire in the West and the Parthian-Persian Empire in the East. It had its early centre in Edessa in the West, a relatively independent kingdom, where the majority of the population spoke Aramaic. Edessa was christianised from Antioch as early as the 2nd century. The...

Be thou my guardian and my guide

Be thou my guardian and my guide. Isaac Williams* (1802-1865). First published in Williams's Hymns on the Catechism (1842), based on the petition in the Lord's Prayer, 'And lead us not into temptation'. The first line was 'Be Thou our Guardian and our Guide', and the hymn was in the first person plural throughout. It was changed to 'Be Thou my Guardian' in the Appendix (1868) to the First Edition of A&M, where it was also given a doxology, thus making a hymn of five stanzas. The four...

African American hymnals

YearDenomination and EditorsTitleComments 1801 African Methodist Episcopal ChurchRichard Allen* A Collection of Spiritual Songs and Hymns Selected From Various Authors, by Richard Allen, African Minister 54 Texts only (no music like other hymnals of this period; the authors of text were not included). 1801 African Methodist Episcopal ChurchRichard Allen A Collection of Hymns and Spiritual Songs from Various Authors, by Richard Allen, Minister of the African Methodist Episcopal...

William Pearson

PEARSON, William. b. Derby, 1832  d. Hackney, London, 17 October 1892. Pearson's parents belonged to the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Traffic Street, Derby, where he was converted at the age of fourteen, and where he later became a local preacher.  In 1874 he went to London to join William Booth's Christian Mission as an evangelist, and became superintendent of the Mission's Shoreditch Circuit.  Subsequently he served as a Mission evangelist in Hastings, Whitechapel, Wellingborough, Manchester...

Henry Ernest Hardy

HARDY, Henry Ernest. b. Kasauli, India, 7 January 1869; d. Bushey Heath, Watford, Hertfordshire, 31 March 1946. He was educated at Clifton College, Bristol, and Keble College, Oxford (BA 1891). He had intended to become a painter, but in October 1891 he went to Oxford House, Bethnal Green, East London, as a volunteer, and found himself called to become a priest. After attending Ely Theological College, he took Holy Orders (deacon 1894, priest 1895), serving as assistant curate of St Andrew's,...

John Page Hopps

HOPPS, John Page. b. London, 6 November 1834; d. Shepperton, Middlesex, 6 April 1911. He was educated at Leicester General Baptist College, where he trained for the Baptist ministry. After serving as minister at Hugglescote and Ibstock (1856) and at Birmingham (1857-), he became a Unitarian in 1860 and went on to serve as a Unitarian minister in Sheffield, Dukinfield, Glasgow, Leicester and London. Hopps published many books, pamphlets and sermons, many of which proved controversial: he...

Thomas Becon

BECON, Thomas. b. Norfolk, 1512/1513; d. Canterbury, 30 June 1567. An East Anglian, he was educated at Cambridge (1527 onwards). He was ordained priest in 1533. At Cambridge he was much influenced by reformers such as Hugh Latimer, and he developed into an outspoken Protestant, often in trouble: he was made to recant his writings twice (1541, 1543), the second time publicly at Paul's Cross with his friend Robert Wisdom*. He flourished under the reign of Edward VI (1547-1553), particularly...

Spanish hymnody

This entry is in two parts. The first, on the early and medieval period, is by Carmen Julia Gutiérrez; the second, from 1502 onwards, is by Elena Gallego Moya/ Jose Fco. Ortega Castejón. Part 1: Early and Medieval The hymns of the Hispanic Liturgy The Hispanic rite was used in the Iberian Peninsula until the 11th century, except for Marca Hispánica and the Bracarense province, where the Romano-Frankish rite was followed from the 8th century. The texts of the Hispanic rite were compiled by...

Hark! the herald angels sing

Hark! the herald angels sing. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1739) as one of five hymns in the same metre (77.77) for the great festivals of the Christian year, entitled 'Hymn for Christmas Day'. It had ten 4-line verses, beginning 'Hark, how all the welkin rings/ 'Glory to the King of kings' [with a misprint, 'Kings of kings' in line 2; see Example 1].   Example 1: Hymns and sacred poems. Published by John Wesley, M. A. Fellow of Lincoln College,...

My hope is built on nothing less

My hope is built on nothing less. Edward Mote* (1797-1874). First published anonymously in the Spiritual Magazine (before 1826) and then in An Appendix to the Second Edition of a Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1826), edited by John Rees. Mote's account of its composition was that the refrain came first, and that he sang four stanzas to a friend ('brother King') and his dying wife. She liked them so much that he wrote two further stanzas, gave them to her, and printed off one thousand copies...

Now may He who from the dead

Now may He who from the dead.John Newton* (1725-1807).  From Olney Hymns (1779), Book III, Hymn 100. It is found among the 'Short Hymns' at the end, in the section entitled 'After Sermon'. It had three stanzas:  Now may He who from the deadBrought the Shepherd of the sheep,Jesus Christ, our King and Head,All our souls in safety keep!  May he teach us to fulfill,What is pleasing in his sight;Perfect us in all his will,And preserve us day and night!  To that dear Redeemer's praise,Who the...

Alice Parker

PARKER, Alice. b. Boston, 16 December 1925. Distinguished, widely celebrated composer, conductor, author and teacher, Parker began composing at the age of eight, and completed her first orchestral score in high school.  She studied at Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, majoring in music performance and composition (BA 1947), and the Juilliard School of Music, New York City (MS 1949), where her teachers included Robert Shaw (1916-1999), Julius Herford (1901-1981) and Vincent Persichetti...

Edward Caswall

CASWALL, Edward. b. Yateley, Hampshire, 15 July 1814; d. Birmingham, 2 January 1878. The son of a clergyman, he was educated at Chigwell, Essex and King Edward's Grammar School, Marlborough, Wiltshire. He entered Brasenose College, Oxford (BA 1836, MA 1838) and took Holy Orders (deacon, 1838, priest, 1839). He became Perpetual Curate of Stratford-sub-Castle, near Salisbury, where his uncle, Thomas Burgess, was bishop. He married in 1841, and in 1845 he and his wife went on a tour of the...

Hymnal Companion to the Book of Common Prayer

Hymnal Companion to the Book of Common Prayer (1870). The Hymnal Companion to the Book of Common Prayer (not a 'Companion' in the usual sense of the word) was edited by Edward Henry Bickersteth* during his time as vicar of Christ Church, Hampstead, and published in 1870. It was successful enough to warrant a revised and enlarged edition in 1877, and a Third and Revised Edition with tunes in 1890. The edition of 1870 was a words-only book, of considerable interest because of its Preface and the...

Jewish Sabbath hymns

Introduction: Hebrew hymns and the problem of English nomenclature In discussions of Hebrew liturgy, the designation hymn poses a linguistic challenge. Neither the English term—especially in its modern Western connotations—nor its classical root has a precise or exclusive equivalent in Hebrew. Struggling to provide translations, modern Hebrew dictionaries give a series of generically loose Hebrew counterparts, none of which adequately captures the nature of the specific Hebrew liturgical forms...

William Booth

BOOTH, William. b. Sneinton, Nottingham, 10 April 1829; d. Hadley Wood, Middlesex, 20 August 1912. The son of a speculative builder, William Booth had what he later called 'a blighted childhood', including work in a pawnbroker's shop in a poor part of Nottingham. He was converted in 1844, and greatly influenced by an American evangelist, the Methodist James Caughey, who visited Nottingham in 1846. He moved to London in 1849, where he became a Methodist preacher, and where he met Catherine...

Bernard of Clairvaux

BERNARD of Clairvaux. b. Fontaines-lez-Dijon, Côte-d'Or, ca. 1090 ; d. 1153. He was born, probably in 1090, at the castle of the son of Tescelin le Saur, lord of Fontaine, vassal of the duke of Burgundy, and of Aleth de Montbard. He studied with the canons of Saint-Vorles at Châtillon-sur-Seine. In 1112, Bernard, accompanied by thirty followers, entered Cîteaux Abbey (founded in 1098 by Robert de Molesme); he took vows one year later. In 1115, at the request of Abbot Stephen Harding, Bernard...

Henry Vaughan

VAUGHAN, Henry, b. Newton-by-Usk, Llansanffraid, Breconshire, April 1622; d. Llansanffraid, 23 Apr 1695. Born into an old, though impoverished, Welsh family, he was educated by a clergyman-schoolmaster, Matthew Herbert of Llangattock, and then at Jesus College, Oxford, from 1638. Leaving in 1640 before taking his degree, Vaughan then studied law in London at the wish of his father. Attempting to escape the consequences of the Civil War (he fought on the Royalist side), he returned to South...

Lift up your hearts to things above

Lift up your hearts to things above. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). From Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), volume II: it was no. 55 of a series of 'Hymns for Christian Friends'. It had twelve 4-line verses. In the 1780 Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists it was printed in five 8-line verses, switching the order of 9 and 10, and omitting the original verses 3 and 8: 3. Our Bosom-Friend, and Brother too, Our Husband, and our Head, Who all He bids delight to...

O God, Thy soldiers' Crown and Guard

O God, thy soldiers' Crown and Guard. Latin, 6th century, translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This is a translation of the anonymous Ambrosian hymn for a martyr, 'Deus tuorum militum'*. Neale translated it for The Hymnal Noted Part I (1851), and his version was used by EH, with minor alterations. Before that, however, it was taken over by the compilers of the First Edition of A&M (1861), who produced their own text, beginning 'O God, thy soldiers' great reward'. The two texts are...

Christian Reformed Church in North America

Hymnody and Hymnals of the Christian Reformed Church in North America. The Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRC) is an offshoot of the Christelijke Gereformeerde Kerk in the Netherlands, and the Reformed Church in America (RCA), which was established in North America about two centuries before the arrival of the Dutch who would form the core of the CRC. Whereas the RCA grew out of a 17th-century emigration at a time when the Dutch were engaged with the world, prosperous, and...

Lully, lulla, thou little tiny child ('Coventry Carol')

Lully, lulla, thou little tiny child ('Coventry Carol'). The Pageant of the Shearmen and Tailors, 1534, 1591.  This carol is from the mystery play entitled The Pageant of the Shearmen and Tailors [Taylors], is known as the 'Coventry Carol' because it was first performed in Coventry, England. It was the property of the two guilds, the Shearmen and the Tailors, and is known as a 'mystery play' because each craft jealously preserved the secrets, or mysteries, of its trade. The original incipit is...

How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord

How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord.  Rippon's Selection of Hymns* (1787), author uncertain. This hymn appeared in the important Baptist collection by John Rippon*, A Selection of Hymns from the best authors, intended as an appendix to Dr Watts's Psalms and Hymns (1787), in seven stanzas, headed 'Exceeding great and precious Promises. 2 Pet. 3: 4.' In the 1790 edition this is amended to '2 Pet. i. 4', which is the correct reference. It was initialled 'K.' ('K------' in 1790). This...

Lydia Huntley Sigourney

SIGOURNEY, Lydia Huntley (née Huntley). b. Norwich, Connecticut, 1 September 1791; d. Hartford, Connecticut,10 June 1865. The only child of the union of Ezekiel (b.1750) and Zerviah Wentworth Huntley (nda). Known by many as 'the sweet singer of Hartford,' Sigourney published anonymously until the mid-1830s when family finances dwindled and she took a more business-like approach to her writing. Her father, who served as the handyman on the estate of Jerusha Talcott Lathrop (1717-1805) in...

God named Love, whose fount Thou art

God named Love, whose fount Thou art. Elizabeth Barrett Browning* (1806-1861).  From The Seraphim, and other poems (1838). This book, besides containing 'The Sleep' (see 'Of all the thoughts of God, that are'* and 'What would we give to our beloved'*), has a sequence of four hymns. The present text is 'Hymn I', entitled 'A Supplication for Love'. It had nine 4-line stanzas, with an unusual accent in line 1 ('namèd') to make up the eight syllables:  God, namèd Love, whose fount Thou art,  Thy...

Frederick William Foster

FOSTER, Frederick William.  b. Bradford, Yorkshire, 1 August 1760; d.Ockbrook, near Derby, 12 April 1835. Foster was a Moravian, educated at Fulneck, near Leeds at the Settlement there, and then at the Moravian Settlement at Barby, Germany. He became a minister in the Moravian Church, and was made a Bishop in 1818. He compiled a Supplement (1808) to A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the Protestant Church of the United Brethren (1801), edited by John Swertner*, re-titled Liturgy and Hymns for...

William J. Kirkpatrick

KIRKPATRICK, William James. b. Duncannon, Perry County, Pennsylvania, 27 February 1838; d. Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 20 September 1921. Kirkpatrick was a gospel and Sunday-school hymn composer and compiler whose career was closely associated with the Methodist Episcopal Church and its music. Occasionally writing under the pseudonym Annie F. Bourne, Kirkpatrick is remembered for his many hymn tunes, including, REDEEMED (1882) for 'Redeemed, how I love to proclaim it' by Fanny...

Bohemian Brethren hymnody

The early history of the Bohemian brethren is closely connected with the Moravian Church (see 'Moravian hymnody'*). In both Bohemia and Moravia, the memory of Jan Hus* and his martyrdom at the Council of Constance in 1415 were influential in the creation of small independent churches in the region, dedicated to the reform of abuses and the preaching of the gospel in the vernacular. The first leaders were Peter Chelčický, who gathered his followers into a congregation at Chelčic, and Gregory of...

Medieval hymns and hymnals

Medieval Hymns and Hymnals. This entry is by various authors. See below. Hymns have been a part of Christian worship since the earliest times, but the use of Latin in worship appears to postdate the acceptance by Emperor Constantine of Christianity as the official Roman faith in 313. On the patristic Latin hymn repertory, see Latin hymns*. Medieval hymns vary in their poetic structure, some being metrical, some accentual, and others are organized according to syllable count together with...

Alleluia! Alleluia! Hearts to heaven and voices raise

Alleluia! Alleluia! Hearts to heaven and voices raise. Christopher Wordsworth* (1807-1885). The opening also appears as 'Hallelujah! Hallelujah!' and 'Alleluya! Alleluya!'. It was first published in The Holy Year (1862) as the first of two hymns for Easter Day. Several different tunes are used, HYMN TO JOY being particularly popular in the United States. The hymn proclaims the Resurrection, looks forward to the harvest of the Second Coming, asks God's blessing on the worshippers, and concludes...

Beautiful Savior

Beautiful Savior. German hymn, 17th century, translated by Joseph Augustus Seiss (1823-1904). In The Lutheran Hymnal (1941) this is the opening line of the translation of 'Schönster Herr Jesu'* from a Roman Catholic Münster Gesangbuch of 1677. Seiss, the translator, was a prominent Lutheran minister. His translation was published in The Sunday School Book for the Use of Evangelical Lutheran Congregations (Philadelphia, 1873). It had four stanzas, the last of which returns to 'Beautiful...

By all your saints still striving

By all your saints still striving. F. Bland Tucker* (1895-1984) and Jerry D. Godwin (1944-). This is a modern version of 'From all Thy saints in warfare'*, written by Tucker and revised by Godwin for H82. In  addition to using the 'you' form, it has been described as 'an edited version of the Tucker revision that reflected concern for language that was both nonmilitaristic and inclusive, yet remained faithful to the lives of the saints as the Church has received them' (The H82...

Come, ye faithful, raise the strain

Come, ye faithful, raise the strain. Greek, attributed to St John Damascene* (ca. 655- ca. 745), translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This translation of the Greek 'άσωμεν πάντες λαοί' ('Asomen pantes laoi') is from the 'Second Epoch' of Greek hymnody (726-820) in Neale's Hymns of the Eastern Church (1862). Neale first made it public in the Christian Remembrancer (April, 1859). It was 'Ode I' for St Thomas's Sunday (Neale's explanatory note in the Preface explained that 'A Canon...

I cannot tell why He, whom angels worship

I cannot tell why He, whom angels worship. William Young Fullerton* (1857-1932). This four-verse hymn was written to be sung to LONDONDERRY AIR, the plangent tune from Fullerton's native Northern Ireland. Probably the first use of the tune with a hymn was in SofP (1925), when it was set to Frank Fletcher*'s 'O Son of Man, our hero strong and tender'*. The date of composition of the words is uncertain, but must be before 1930, when they were printed in a Baptist supplement for young...

Je Te salue, mon certain Rédempteur

Je Te salue, mon certain Rédempteur. French Psalter, Strasbourg, 1545, possibly by Jean Calvin*. Found in an edition of the French Psalter published in Strasbourg in 1545, this was printed in Corpus Reformatorum volume 34, Calvini opera vol. 6 (Braunschweig, 1867). It was placed at the end of a set of nine French metrical psalms by Calvin, but regarded by the editors as of doubtful authorship. In the year following the publication of Corpus Reformatorum the text was translated by Elizabeth...

J.R. Baxter

BAXTER, Jesse Randall, Jr. b. Lebanon, DeKalb County, Alabama, 8 December 1887; d. Dallas, Texas, USA, 21 January 1960. Prominent in the development of southern gospel music, Baxter, affectionately called 'Pap' or 'Pa', was best-known for his association with the Stamps-Baxter Music & Printing Company (see Stamps-Baxter Publications*).  That company flourished in great part because of Baxter's business acumen, but he was respected too for his skills as an editor, lyricist, and...

O for the robes of whiteness

O for the robes of whiteness. Charitie Lees De Chenez* (1841-1923). According to JJ, p. 109, this was published in Within the Veil, by C.L.S. [Charitie Lees Smith, her maiden name] (1867), but this has not been verified. It has also been stated that it was published in leaflet form in 1860. It was certainly printed in Lyra Britannica (1867), edited by Charles Rogers, where it was entitled 'Heavenly Anticipations'. Philip Schaff*, who printed it in Christ in Song (New York, 1869), described it...

Precious Lord, take my hand

Precious Lord, take my hand. Thomas A. Dorsey* (1899-1993). Written in Chicago in August 1932, under distressing circumstances: Dorsey's wife Nettie died in childbirth, and her child died soon afterwards. Dorsey, who was at a revival meeting when he heard the news of his wife's death, was distraught. He was consoled by a friend, Theodore Frye, who took Dorsey to a local music college where Dorsey idly began playing on the piano what he remembered of an old tune. This was a pentatonic...

Thomas Ellwood

ELLWOOD, Thomas. b. Crowell, near Chinnor, Oxfordshire, 1639 (baptized 15 Oct); d. Amersham, Buckinghamshire, 1 May 1713. He was born into a Puritan family which moved to London during the Civil War to support the Parliamentary cause. In 1659 Ellwood heard two Quakers preach at Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, and was so impressed that he became one of the early Friends. Thereafter his life was dominated by the joys of being a Quaker (friendships, such as that with the Pennington family, to...

Thou art coming, O my Saviour

Thou art coming, O my Saviour. Frances Ridley Havergal* (1836-1879). This Advent hymn was written in 1873, probably at about the time that Havergal had her experience of 'the blessedness of true consecration'. It was published in a religious newspaper, The Rock, in 1873, and in Under the Surface (1874) with the title 'Advent Song'. It had seven enthusiastic stanzas, whose rhythms, repetitions and punctuation (with an abundance of exclamation marks) indicate Havergal's ardent response to the...

We rest on Thee, our Shield and our Defender

We rest on Thee, our Shield and our Defender. Edith Gilling Cherry* (1872-1897). This remarkable hymn was published in The Master's Touch: and other Poems (n.d., but probably not long after Edith's death), edited by Edith Cherry's mother, Matilda S. Cherry. It was entitled 'We rest on Thee', with a reference to 2 Chronicles 14: 11: And Asa cried unto the Lord his God, and said, Lord, it is nothing with thee to help, whether with many, or with them that have no power: help us, O Lord our...

When God would prove his love

When God would prove his love. John Murray* (ca. 1740-1815). This was the second of five hymns first published in the 1782 edition of Christian Hymns, Poems and Sacred Songs, Sacred to the Praise of God, Our Saviour, compiled by English Universalist James Relly and his brother John Relly.  The book was first published in London in 1754, and the 1782 edition was published in Portsmouth, New Hampshire for Noah Parker (1734-1787), a convert of Murray's and preacher in Portsmouth (Brewster, pp....

Hymni Sacri et Novi

Hymni Sacri et Novi (1689). This is the title of a collection by Jean-Baptiste de Santeuil*, published in Paris and dedicated to Cardinal Bulloni, abbot-elect of Cluny. The author was 'Santolio Victorino' (de Santeuil's religious name, Santolius Victorinus). It contained 53 hymns for saints' days and the Great Festivals of the church's year, and 12 for collective and general use for martyrs, doctors, evangelists, confessors, and others. There followed a prayer and three poems, succeeded by 12...

Erik Routley

ROUTLEY, Erik Reginald. b. Brighton, Sussex, 31 October 1917; d. Nashville, Tennessee, USA, 8 October 1982. He was the only child of John, a businessman and town councillor who was Mayor of Brighton in 1936-37, and Eleanor, a homemaker and musician. He attended Fonthill Preparatory School, 1925-31 and Lancing College, 1931-36. He read Literae Humaniores (nicknamed 'Mods' and 'Greats': classics/ ancient history and philosophy) at Magdalen College, Oxford (BA 1940, MA 1943). He became an...

Edwin O. Excell

EXCELL, Edwin Othello. b. Uniontown, Stark County, Ohio, 13 December 1851; d. Chicago, Illinois, 10 June 1921. Publisher, singer, and gospel song composer best known for his Sunday-school songs, including the standard arrangement of the shape-note melody, AMAZING GRACE, and his tune, BLESSINGS (see following). Excell was born to Rev. Joshua James (1825-1911), a singer and minister in the German Reformed Church, and Emily (née Hess, d. 1888). Before his musical career became successful, he...

Anna Letitia Barbauld

BARBAULD, Anna Letitia (née Aikin). b. Kibworth Harcourt, Leicestershire, 20 June 1743; d. Stoke Newington, London, 9 March 1825. At Kibworth her father was a Presbyterian minister teaching at the dissenting academy (her maternal grandfather, John Jennings, had taught Philip Doddridge* there). In 1753 her father moved to the celebrated Warrington Academy, where she thrived in the cultural and intellectual freedom and began to write, publishing (with her brother John) Poems (1773) and...

Christopher Wordsworth

WORDSWORTH, Christopher. b. Lambeth, London, 30 October 1807; d. Harewood, Yorkshire, 21 March 1885. He was brought up at Bocking, Essex, where his father was then rector, and from 1816 at Sundridge, Kent. He was a nephew of the poet William Wordsworth*, and became one of his literary executors and his first biographer. He was educated at Winchester, where he was outstanding both as a scholar and an athlete, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he gained many academic distinctions, becoming...

Kathy Galloway

GALLOWAY, Kathryn Johnston (née Orr). b. Dumfries, Scotland, 6 August 1952. She was educated at Boroughmuir Secondary School, Edinburgh (1964-70) and Glasgow University (BD 1974, Diploma in Pastoral Studies, 1976). She was licensed as a minister of the Church of Scotland, Edinburgh Presbytery (1976) and ordained in 1977 while Assistant Minister, Muirhouse Parish Church, Edinburgh (1976-9). She has been a member of the Iona Community since 1976, was co-warden of Iona Abbey from 1983-89, and was...

Arthur Somervell

SOMERVELL, (Sir) Arthur. b. Windermere, Cumbria, 5 June 1863; d. London, 2 May 1937. Somervell was a composer and educationist, the youngest of six sons and nine children of Robert Miller Somervell, leather merchant and founder of Somervell Brothers (manufacturers of K (for 'Kendal') Shoes), and Anne Wilson. He was educated for one year at Uppingham School (1878-9) and then at King's College, Cambridge (BA 1884), where he also studied composition under Charles Villiers Stanford*. At Stanford's...

Advent tells us Christ is near

Advent tells us Christ is near. (Arabella) Katherine Hankey* (1834-1911). According to JJ, p. 483, this was written in 1888 for Sunday School children at St Peter's, Eaton Square, London, then as now a prosperous part of the city (although Hankey organised classes for shop girls). It was printed on a card, with a tune composed by Hankey herself, before being included in many English-speaking hymnbooks on both sides of the Atlantic. It is not a hymn for Advent, in spite of the first line: it is...

David J. Hurd Jr.

HURD, David J., Jr. b. Brooklyn, New York, 27 January 1950. Hurd studied at the High School of Music and Art and the Juilliard School before going on to Oberlin College (MusB, 1971). Upon graduating from Oberlin, he was appointed Assistant Organist of Trinity Church, Wall Street in lower Manhattan where he served under the direction of Larry King. He was appointed to the faculty of Duke University in 1972 concurrent with graduate studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In 1973...

Daily, daily sing to Mary

Daily, daily sing to Mary. Henry Bittleston* (1818-1886), from the 'Hymn of Saint Casimir' probably by Bernard of Cluny* (12th century). The Latin hymn from which this translation is taken is part 7 of a cycle of hymns, the Mariale, beginning 'Ut jucundas cervus undas, aestuans desiderat'. In the course of a careful discussion of possible authorship, James Mearns* comes down on the side of Bernard of Cluny as the most likely author (JJ, pp. 1200-1202). Section vii of the Mariale begins 'Omni...

Henry John Gauntlett

GAUNTLETT, Henry John. b. Wellington, Shropshire, 9 July 1805; d. 21 February 1876. His father, Henry Gauntlett, an Evangelical minister, became curate (1811) then vicar (1815) of Olney, Buckinghamshire, where he appointed his musically precocious boy as organist at the age of ten. But in 1826 he articled his son to a solicitor: he qualified as a solicitor in 1831; he was also organist of St. Olave, Southwark, from 1827 to 1847. He was an expert on organ construction and a pioneering advocate...

Lord, whose Love through humble service

Lord, whose Love through humble service. Albert Bayly* (1901-1984). Bayly composed this four-stanza hymn in response to an invitation for hymns on social concerns extended by the Hymn Society of America (HSUSC) and the Department of Social Welfare of the National Council of Churches in Christ in the United States. It was published, set to HYFRYDOL, in the society's Seven New Social Welfare Hymns (19610, described in the Preface as hymns to express 'the interrelationship of worship and service...

Edward Elgar

ELGAR, (Sir) Edward William. b. Broadheath, Worcestershire, 2 June 1857; d. Worcester, 23 February 1934. At Broadheath his father, William Henry Elgar, ran a music retailing business and was organist of St George's Roman Catholic Church. Educated at Littleton House School and self-taught as a composer, Elgar was later to receive honorary degrees from several major universities. He was knighted in 1904, received the O.M. in 1911, and was appointed Master of the King's Music in 1924. Elgar was...

Victoria Carbery

CARBERY, Lady Victoria Cecil Evans-Freke (née Cecil). b. 6 November 1843; d. 22 February 1932. She was the daughter of Brownlow Cecil, second Marquess of Exeter, who christened her after the young Queen. In 1866 she married (his second marriage) William Charles Evans-Freke (d. 1894), eighth Baron Carbery. She was designated Baroness Carbery in 1889. Before that date, as 'V. Evans-Freke', she had (probably through the Earl of Harrowby) become friendly with Edward Harland*. She produced The Song...

Ira D. Sankey

SANKEY, Ira David. b. Edinburgh, near New Castle, Pennsylvania, 28 August 1840; d. Brooklyn, New York 14 August 1908. He was one of eleven children born of the marriage of devout Methodists David and Mary (née Leeper) Sankey. The family settled a few miles east in Western Reserve Harbour and attended the nearby Methodist Church in King's Chapel where Sankey at age 16 was 'converted'. Sankey learned to sing hymns in Sunday school and in the family hymn sings. 'By the time he was eight . . . he...

Chrysaphes the Younger

CHRYSAPHES the Younger b. 1620/25?; d. ca. 1682?. Little is known for certain about the life of Chrysaphes the Younger, who helped Byzantine music to flourish under Ottoman rule. Born in Constantinople, he is mentioned as protopsaltes of the Cathedral of Hagia Sophia in April 1655 and he seems to have worked there until at least 1665: in manuscript Patriarchal Library Hierosol. 4 (dated 1655) Chrysaphes is mentioned by name and described as protopsaltes; in the manuscript Patmos 930 (dated...

Manuel Francisco

FRANCISCO, Manuel ('Manoling'). b. Quezon City, Philippines, 26 October 1965. Educated at the Ateneo de Manila High School, he grew up playing keyboard, and trained for a career in classical piano. After his uncle, his mother's first cousin, Benigno Aquino, was killed in 1983, Francisco became a student activist. At the age of 20, while in his second year in college, he entered the Jesuit Novitiate in Novaliches. Ordained in 1997, his first assignment was as a priest and school director of an...

Sources of hymns, Medieval

Our earliest sources of information about medieval hymns are the 6th-century monastic rules of St Benedict*, Caesarius of Arles, and Aurelian of Arles. These mention, in more or less detail, hymns sung within the Divine Office. Indirect references to hymns continue to be an important source of information throughout the middle ages. Examples include the Ordines romani (descriptions of Roman liturgical practice), and grammatical treatises, from Augustine*'s De musica through Bede*'s De arte...

Free at last

Free at last. African American spiritual*.  The concept of freedom is integral the theology of the spirituals according to liberation theologian James H. Cone (1936-2018):  The divine liberation of the oppressed from slavery is the central theological concept in the black spirituals. These songs show that black slaves did not believe that human servitude was reconcilable with their African past and their knowledge of the Christian gospel. They did not believe that God created Africans to be...

Customary

Customaries are texts that describe or prescribe liturgical uses in a monastery, along with information on the daily life of the community as well as the duties of the monastic officers. They supplement the regulations set forth in the Rule of Benedict*. Whereas the Rule is a set of guidelines to be applied in principle to any Benedictine community, customaries offer much more detail on the liturgy and reflect the way of life in a particular house; moreover, they were written not only by...

Greek hymns, metrics

As far as we can judge from the few remaining pieces of evidence (such as the famous 'Phos hilaron'*) and from some late testimonies (Saint Augustine*, Egeria's pilgrimage, comments by abbot Pembo, the Life of Auxentios), the earliest forms of Christian hymnody in Greek were written in rhythmic prose, were based on patterns of parallelism and antithesis (like the biblical psalms and canticles) and were sung responsorially. It is generally assumed that the earliest hymns, such as troparia and...

Office hymns

This is the name given to hymns used in the recitation of the Divine Office, or the modern Liturgy of the Hours observed by cloistered communities. Prior to the Second Vatican Council, Office hymns were typically collected either in a separate volume — a combined hymnary and psalter, which would contain all of the hymns and psalms used in the Office — or in the breviary itself, in a special section either at the rear of the volume or in a dividing section between the Temporale and Sanctorale....

Bill Gaither

Gaither, Bill (William James). b. Alexandria, Indiana, 28 March 1936. Gaither was one of four children of the marriage of George W. (1913-2005) and Lela (née Hartwell) (1914-2001). The farming family attended the Church of God in Alexandria, a restoration group with Wesleyan holiness roots headquartered in Anderson, Indiana, (not related to Pentecostal denominations with the same name). Early on Gaither studied piano and organ, 'performing wherever he could in recitals and as an accompanist'...

There's a star in the east (Rise up, shepherd, and follow)

There's a star in the east (Rise up, shepherd, and follow). African American spiritual*. The first stanza as printed in current hymnals is as follows: There's a star in the east on Christmas morn; Rise up, shepherd and follow; It will lead to the place where the Christ was born; Rise up, shepherd, and follow. Follow, follow, rise up, shepherd, and follow, Follow the star of Bethlehem. Rise up, shepherd, and follow. The noted African American author James Weldon Johnson*...

Pretty Little Hymns for Good Little Children

Pretty Little Hymns for Good Little Children (1850). This is the title of a hymn book by a certain Louisa Watts, whose preface is dated from St John's Wood Terrace, April 1850. It contained 130 hymns. Its title suggests that it was one of the many books intended to indoctrinate children with impossible ideas of goodness, although the preface makes it clear that it was a sequel to Louisa Watts's Pretty Little Poems for Pretty Little People (Halifax, 1847), which had had 'a sale so large as to...

Bertram Luard Selby

LUARD SELBY, Bertram. b. Ightham, Kent, 12 February 1853; d. Winterton, Brigg, Lincolnshire, 26 December 1918 (usually known as 'Luard Selby' with or without hyphen; he introduced the hyphen, ca. 1905). He studied under Reinecke and Jadassohn at the Leipzig Conservatorium (where Stanford* was a fellow pupil) before returning to England in 1876, when he became organist at St Barnabas', Marylebone, and Highgate School. He was organist of Salisbury Cathedral (1881-83), before he decided to move,...

John Jacob Niles

NILES, John Jacob. b. Portland (now a neighborhood of Louisville), Kentucky, 28 April 1892; d. Boot Hill Farm, near Lexington, Kentucky, 1 March 1980. Niles was a singer, composer, and collector of traditional music. His Christmas carol, 'I wonder as I wander'*, is found in several hymnals. As a youngster living near a river city in Kentucky, Niles became familiar with folk music and various other forms of musical entertainment. He was especially fond of vaudeville. Before leaving his work on...

William Henry Monk

MONK, William Henry. b. London, 16 March 1823; d. Stoke Newington, London, 1 March 1889. Monk studied with Thomas Adams, J.A. Hamilton and G.A. Griesbach and held appointments as organist of various London churches: St Peter's, Eaton Square (1841-43); St George's Chapel, Albermarle Street (1843-45); St Paul's, Portman Square (1845-47); and St Matthias, Stoke Newington (1852-89). In addition he was appointed choirmaster (1847), organist (1849) and Professor of Vocal Music (1874) at King's...

Craft of composing hymn tunes

Hymn tunes are little things that are not regarded as having much value. [Yet] they symbolize and relate deeply, however, to big things, well beyond the obvious musical ones . . . .(Paul Westermeyer, 2005) Congregational song has the power to forge community identity, enliven the congregation, and provide an experiential encounter with the intangible character of God. It fulfills this task by its ability to transcend the cerebral to embody the emotive. To this end, tunes have a significant...

Come, Holy Spirit, Dove divine

Come, Holy Spirit, Dove divine. Adoniram Judson* (1788-1850). 'Come, Holy Spirit, Dove divine' is the most widely sung of three hymns written by Adoniram Judson. This four-stanza hymn is extracted from Judson's seven-stanza baptism hymn 'Our Savior bowed beneath the wave'*. The original hymn, written ca. 1829 and first printed in Thomas Ripley's A Selection of Hymns, for Conference & Prayer Meetings, and Other Occasions, Second Edition (1831), appeared under the title 'Hymn written by Mr....

Jesu, Lover of my soul

Jesu, Lover of my soul. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1740) in five 8-line verses, with the title 'In Temptation'. The Preface to that collection suggested that the hymns it contained were concerned with salvation as the gift of grace, and with 'the gradual process of the work of God in the soul or… the chief hindrances in the way.' Thus two other hymns in the volume were headed 'In Temptation' and others 'Written in the Stress of Temptation' or 'At the...

Oft in danger, oft in woe

Oft in danger, oft in woe. Henry Kirke White* (1785-1806), Frances Sara Fuller-Maitland* (1809-1877), and others. First published in William Bengo Collyer*'s Hymns partly collected and partly original, designed as a Supplement to Dr Watts's Psalms and Hymns (1812). Collyer said that he had found ten lines of the hymn written on the back of an old mathematics paper belonging to White, who had died while still a Cambridge undergraduate: Much in sorrow, oft in woe,Onward Christians, onward...

Tomorrow shall be my dancing day

Tomorrow shall be my dancing day. English Traditional.  The cosmic dance between Christ and humanity is the basis of this carol. Its unusual first-person-singular perspective and dance metaphor echoes the Apocryphal Acts of John (Second Century) in which Christ says:  I would be saved, and I would save. Amen. . . I would be born, and I would bear. Amen. . . Grace danceth. I would pipe; dance ye all. Amen. . . Whoso danceth not, knoweth not what cometh to pass. Amen. (ver. 95).  The eleven...

Charismatic hymnody

Christian charismatic communities and churches are extremely diverse in their theology and ecclesiology. This analysis will be mainly focused on material emanating from John Wimber*'s Vineyard Churches, the 'Toronto Blessing' movement, and the like. They have been chosen because of their pre-eminent status in contemporary Charismatic Renewal: their songs have affected styles and concepts in worship that have touched virtually every denomination in every corner of the globe. Wimber, indeed,...

Rome and the use of hymns

[This entry is in two parts. The first, by Joseph Dyer, discusses Roman hymnody from its beginnings to the 15th century. The second, by Daniel Zager, details 16th-century developments.] Early and Medieval hymnody Rome proved very reluctant to introduce the singing of hymns in the Divine Office. They were accepted by the papal court and the major basilicas only towards the end of the 12th century. In this they probably differed from the urban monasteries that followed the Rule of Benedict*,...

When the saints go marching in

When the saints go marching in. African American spiritual*, author unknown.  This is a spiritual that has been sung in worship, at funerals, and at American Civil Rights meetings. It has been recorded by jazz musicians and other artists, and appropriated by popular culture for use at sporting events.  Origins Originating in the oral tradition of the African American community, its precise authorship is unknown, although it is believed to have been first sung in the early 1900s (regrettably...

Roman Catholic hymnody, British

Before the Second Vatican Council English Catholic hymnody falls into two distinct phases: the era between the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829 and the Second Vatican Council (1962-3) and the years between that time and the present day. In the first period Catholic hymnody had a distinctly different character from its Protestant counterparts, partly because of the history of the English Catholic community; but also because it served very different functions. Between 1559 and the First...

Jennie E. Hussey

HUSSEY, Jennie Evelyn. b. Henniker, New Hampshire, 8 February 1874; d. Concord, New Hampshire, 5 September 1958. For most of her life she lived on a New Hampshire farm belonging to her fourth-generation Quaker family, where for most of her adult life she cared for her invalid sister. During this time-devouring and strength-testing task, she wrote many poems, including 150 hymns, of which the best known is 'King of my life, I crown thee now'*, with its plangent refrain: Lest I forget...

May Whittle Moody

MOODY, Mary ('May') Jennette Whittle.  b. Chicago, Illinois, 20 March 1870; d. East Northfield, Massachusetts, 20 August 1963.  A daughter of hymn writer Daniel Webster Whittle* and Abigail (nèe Hanson) Whittle (1839-1906), and daughter-in-law of Dwight L. Moody*, Mary Moody was a singer, composer, and hymnal editor.  From the ages of fifteen to eighteen, Mary Whittle attended the Northfield School, founded by D. W. Moody in the Massachusetts town of his birth.  Oberlin College records show...

Benjamin Hall Kennedy

KENNEDY, Benjamin Hall. b. Summer Hill, Tipton, near Birmingham, 6 November 1804; d. Torquay, Devon, 6 April 1889. He was educated at King Edward's School, Birmingham (1814-18) and then at Shrewsbury School (1819-23), followed by St John's College, Cambridge (BA 1827). At Cambridge he was an outstanding figure, winning many of the University Prizes, becoming President of the Union, and being a member of the 'Apostles' (the intellectual society that included such figures as Arthur Hallam and...

C.S. Phillips

PHILLIPS, Charles Stanley. b. Boston, Lincolnshire, 1883; d. Lingfield, Surrey, 28 November 1949. He is usually referred to by his initials only, as was the custom in his day. He was educated at King's College, Cambridge (BA 1904, MA 1911) and the University of Durham (BD 1913, DD 1920). He took Holy Orders, serving as a curate at Stoke on Trent (1906-09), Woolwich (1909-12), and Bury (1912-14). He returned to Cambridge as Lecturer and Chaplain at Selwyn College (1914-16). He was vicar of...

George Frank Lockwood

LOCKWOOD, George Frank. b. Tacoma, Washington, 3 April 1946. George Lockwood is the son of George F. Lockwood, a Methodist minister, and Mable Lockwood (née Perkins), an accomplished musician. At four years of age, the family moved to the Chicago area where his father had been raised; his mother, who had received her bachelor's degree in organ from Boston University, encouraged George and his brothers to study piano at an early age. He sang in choirs, including some under his mother's...

Surrexit Christus hodie

Surrexit Christus hodie. Latin, 14th century. This is found in Daniel, Thesaurus Hymnologicus I. 341 in the section 'Carmina Sacra, quae in Breviarum Ordinarium non redacta, private consilio ad sacra obeunda adhibita sunt'. Daniel's text, entitled 'De Resurrectione Domine', was as follows: Surrexit Christus hodie Humano pro solamine. Alleluia Mortem qui passus pridie Miserrimo pro homine. All. Mulieres ad tumulum Dona ferunt aromatum. All. Quaerentes Iesum dominum Qui est salvator...

Ludwig Senfl

Senfl, Ludwig. b. ca. 1489/91; d. 1542/3. Of Swiss origin, Senfl became a choirboy in the Imperial court chapel of Maximilian I in 1496. He was a pupil of Henricus Isaac*, and remained attached to the Imperial court choir, both as an alto and as a composer, until its dissolution on Maximilian's death in 1519. By 1523 he was in Munich, serving Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria. Although Senfl was sympathetic to the reformation whilst his employer remained a committed Catholic, he kept this post until...

Herbert Kynaston

KYNASTON, Herbert. b. Warwick, 23 November 1809; d. London, 26 October 1878. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he had a distinguished career, graduating in 1831with first class honours in Literae Humaniores (Greek and Latin, Ancient History and Philosophy). He became a tutor at Christ Church (1836), and took Holy Orders (deacon and priest 1834), serving as curate at Culham, near Oxford. In 1838, at the age of 28, he was appointed High Master (Head) of St...

Austrian hymnody

Introduction Vernacular-language Christian hymnody in central Europe is characterised by a rich history of spiritual singing in church communities, especially since the 16th century, during which period the church hymn emerged as a fundamental characteristic of reformed Christianity. But the beginnings of this history go back to the Middle Ages. From then onwards, and not only as a reaction to reformed practice, the vernacular church hymn formed an important part of church musical and...

Jaroslav Vajda

VAJDA, Jaroslav Jan. b. Lorain, Ohio, 28 April 1919; d. St Louis, Missouri, 10 May 2008. From a Slovak immigrant family, he was educated at Concordia Junior College, and Concordia Theological Seminary, Clayton, St Louis, Missouri, the conservative evangelical seminary of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod. He served as a pastor of Slovak-English Lutheran congregations at Cranesville, Pennsylvania (1945-49); Alexandria, Indiana (1949-53); and Brackenridge, Pennsylvania (1953-63); and St Lucas...

O Saviour, Who for man hast trod

O Saviour, Who for man hast trod. Charles Coffin* (1676-1749), translated by John Chandler* (1806-1876), altered by Robert Campbell* (1814-1868). The Latin hymn, 'Opus peregisti tuum', was printed in the Paris Breviary of 1736 and in Hymni Sacri Auctore Carolo Coffin (also 1736), for Ascension-tide. The translation was made by Chandler for his Hymns of the Primitive Church (1837), which also printed the Latin text as 'Hymnus 72', beginning Opus peregisti tuum, Te, Christe victorem necis,...

The God of Abraham praise

The God of Abraham praise. Thomas Olivers* (1725-1799). Written probably in 1770 at the house of Olivers' friend John Bakewell* in London, and published in leaflet form as A Hymn to the God of Abraham. In Three Parts: Adapted to a celebrated Air, sung by the Priest, Signior Leoni, etc., at the Jews' Synagogue, in London. It had twelve stanzas. 'Signior Leoni' was the name given by Olivers to Meyer Lyon (1751-97), cantor at the Great Synagogue in Duke's Place, London. He must have heard Lyon...

Amy Grant

GRANT, Amy. b. Augusta, Georgia, 25 November 1960. A prominent Christian song-writer and pop singer, Grant attended Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina (1978-80) and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (1980-81). She grew up in a conservative Church of Christ congregation that did not believe musical instruments were appropriate for worship.  Influenced by charismatic theology and practice via Don Finto (1930-) and Nashville's independent Belmont Church, she began writing...

Before the throne of God above

Before the throne of God above. Charitie Lees De Chenez* (1841-1923). According to JJ, p. 109, this was written in 1863 and published in Within the Veil, by C.L.S. (1867); 'C.L.S.' stands for Charitie Lees Smith, her maiden name. It was entitled 'The Advocate'. Before that it had been included by Charles Haddon Spurgeon* in Our Own Hymn Book (1866), so it must have been published elsewhere, probably in leaflet form. It crossed the Atlantic very quickly: JJ noted its appearance in Laudes...

Friedrich Spitta

SPITTA, Friedrich Adolf Wilhelm. b. Wittingen, near Lüneburg, 10 January 1852; d. Göttingen, 7 June 1924. He was the son of Karl Johann Philipp Spitta*, born at Wittingen when his father was pastor there, and educated at Hildesheim when the family moved to Peine nearby. He followed his father and two elder brothers to the University of Göttingen, with a period at Erlangen, followed by a post at a seminary in Halle (1877), as an assistant pastor at Bonn (1879) and as pastor at Oberkassel (1881)....

Geoffrey Anketell Studdert-Kennedy

STUDDERT-KENNEDY, Geoffrey Anketell. b. Leeds, 27 September 1883; d. Liverpool, 8 March 1929. Of Irish extraction, he was the seventh son of the Vicar of St Mary's, Leeds, a poor industrial parish where he grew up and formed a lifelong sympathy with the underprivileged (an aisle is dedicated to his memory in Leeds Parish Church, now Leeds Minster). He was educated at home, at Leeds Grammar School and at Trinity College, Dublin. After two years as a schoolmaster, he was ordained (deacon 1908,...

Godfrey Thring

THRING, Godfrey. b. Alford, Somerset, 25 March 1823; d. Shamley Green, near Guildford, Surrey, 13 September 1903. He was the third son of the rector and squire (sometimes called the 'squarson') of the village. His elder brother Edward was an outstanding headmaster of Uppingham, a leading independent school, and joint compiler of the Hymn Book for the use of Uppingham and Sherborne Schools (1874). Godfrey was educated at Shrewsbury School and in 1841 entered Balliol College, Oxford, graduating...

Godwin Sadoh

SADOH, Godwin. b. Lagos State, Nigeria, 28 March 1965. An Anglican organist, composer, hymn writer, church musician, and professor of music, Godwin Sadoh received certificates in piano, theory, and general musicianship from the Royal School of Music, London (1982-1986), and degrees in piano and composition from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (BA, 1988); in African ethnomusicology from University of Pittsburgh (MA, 1998), in organ performance and church music from University of...

Hail, Thou Source of every blessing

Hail, Thou Source of every blessing. Basil Woodd* (1760-1831). This hymn for the Epiphany was first published in Woodd's A New Metrical Version of the Psalms of David; with an Appendix of Select Psalms and Hymns, adapted to The Service of the United Church of England and Ireland (1821), where it opens the Epiphany section, and is preceded by the title 'Psalm XCVI, LXXII. Eph. iii. 1.6.' It had three 8-line stanzas: Hail, Thou Source of every blessing,   Sov'reign Father of Mankind! Gentiles...

Innario christiano

Innario christiano (2000). Published in Turin, this is the third edition of the hymnbook used by Protestant churches in Italy, the Federazione delle chiese evangeliche in Italia (FCEI). It is the successor to the editions published in Florence in 1922 and in Turin in 1969. It was edited by a committee (Bruno Rostagno, Alberto Taccia, Franco Tagliero, under the chairmanship of Flavio Gatti, with Ferruccio Corsani as music editor). The introduction draws attention to particularly notable features...

I know that my Redeemer lives

I know that my Redeemer lives. Samuel Medley* (1738-1799). First published anonymously in two anthologies of hymns, George Whitefield*'s Hymns for Social Worship (23rd Edition, 1777) and Richard De Courcy*'s Collection of Psalms and Hymns (Fourth Edition, 1793). It was published in Medley's own posthumous collection, Hymns (1800), with five small alterations, including the substitution of 'sweet passage' for 'sweet sentence' in the first stanza. It had nine 4-line verses. The complete text in...

Light of the world, faint were our weary feet

Light of the world, faint were our weary feet. Laura Ormiston Chant* (1848-1923).  In Appendix II of JJ, this hymn was annotated as follows: 'Written in June 1901, at the request of the Rev. S. Collier, Superintendent of the Central Wesleyan Mission in Manchester' (p.1620). Samuel Collier (1855-1921) was one of the leaders of the Methodist Church at the time (he was President of the Wesleyan Methodist Conference in 1913). JJ went on to quote Chant herself, as she remembered that Collier had...

O Paradise, O Paradise

O Paradise! O Paradise! Frederick William Faber (1814-1863). Published in Faber's Hymns (1862), in seven 8-line stanzas, entitled 'Paradise'. It was the penultimate hymn in the book, followed only by one entitled 'Heaven'. The second half of each stanza forms a refrain: Where loyal hearts, and true,   Stand ever in the light, All rapture through and through,   In God's most holy sight? The first five lines of each stanza were as follows: O Paradise! O Paradise!   Who doth not crave for...

Samuel Wesley (I)

WESLEY, Samuel (I). b. 1662 (baptised 17 December); d. 25 April 1735. Born at Winterborn, Whitchurch, Dorset, where his father was vicar until he was ejected from the living in consequence of the Act of Uniformity; he was the father of Samuel (II)*, John* and Charles Wesley*. He was educated at a dissenting academy, but joined the Church of England and was educated at Exeter College, Oxford, where he lived in poverty. He married Susanna, the daughter of Dr Samuel Annesley, a celebrated Puritan...

The Saints of God! their conflict past

The Saints of God! their conflict past. William Dalrymple Maclagan* (1826-1910).  Written in 1869, this hymn was first published in a Church of England periodical, Church Bells (1870), and immediately afterwards in the SPCK Church Hymns (1871, Church Hymns with Tunes, 1874). It was included in the Second Edition of A&M (1875) as a hymn for All Saints' Day. It had five stanzas:  The Saints of God! their conflict past,And life's long battle won at last,No more they need the shield or...

I set myself against the Lord

I set myself against the Lord. John Leland* (1754–1841).  This hymn was probably first printed in two books published in 1793: Eleazar Clay, Hymns and Spiritual Songs, selected from Several Approved Authors, Recommended by the Baptist General Committee of Virginia (Richmond, Virginia: John Dixon), and John Peak, A New Collection of Hymns and Spiritual Songs, Third Edition (Vermont: Alden Spooner, 1793). It had ten stanzas in the meter of 8.8.6.8.8.6:  I set myself against the Lord,Despised...

Honor Mary Thwaites

THWAITES, Honor Mary (née Scott Good). b. Young, New South Wales, Australia, 21 September 1914; d. Canberra, 24 November 1993. Born into a Presbyterian family (her father, a family doctor, was an elder of the Presbyterian Church), she became a member of that church as well as working as a Sunday-school teacher. She was educated at the Geelong Church of England Grammar School, and went on to study French and German at the University of Melbourne, graduating with a BA Hons degree. It was while...

Land of our Birth, we pledge to thee

Land of our Birth, we pledge to thee. Rudyard Kipling* (1865-1936). This is the concluding poem in Kipling's Puck of Pook's Hill (1906), a series of stories and poems for young people constructed on episodes of English history. It was entitled 'The Children's Song'. It had eight stanzas, all of which are found in SofP: Land of our Birth, we pledge to theeOur love and toil in the years to be;When we are grown and take our place,As men and women of our race. Father in heaven, who lovest all,O...

Peter the Venerable

PETER the Venerable (Peter of St. Maurice). b. 1092 or 1094; d. 25 December 1156. Petrus (Mauricius) Venerabilis, born at Montboissier, Auvergne, abbot of Cluny* 1122-1156, was one of the greatest of Cluny's abbots in its heyday in the 10th-12th centuries. He came of a noble family, became an oblate of Sauxillanges and entered Cluny under Abbot Hugh. He was prior of Vézelay (ca.1115-1120) and of Domène near Grenoble (1120-1122), in which year he was elected Abbot of Cluny. He led the monastery...

Rise, glorious Conqueror, rise

Rise, glorious Conqueror, rise. Matthew Bridges* (1800-1894). From Bridges's Hymns of the Heart, for the use of Catholics (1848). It was entitled 'Ascension'. It had seven stanzas, often shortened and altered in hymnbooks. The original text was as follows: Rise - glorious Conqueror, rise, Into Thy native skies, -   Assume Thy right; And where in many a fold The clouds are backward roll'd - Pass through those gates of gold,   And reign in light! Victor o'er death and hell! Cherubic legions...

Saviour, teach me day by day

Saviour, teach me day by day. Jane Eliza Leeson* (1807/8- 1881). First published in Leeson's Hymns and Scenes of Childhood (1842). It had four 8-line stanzas, based on 1 John 4: 19: 'We love him, because he first loved us.' In modern British books the hymn has normally been shortened to four 4-line verses, as in SofP, using 1a, 2a, 3b and 4a: Saviour, teach me, day by day,Love's sweet lesson to obey;Sweeter lesson cannot be,Loving him who first loved me. With a child's glad heart of loveAt...

The day thou gavest, Lord, is ended

The day thou gavest, Lord, is ended. John Ellerton* (1826-1893). This hymn was published in A Liturgy for Missionary Meetings (Frome: Hodges, 1870). It was revised for inclusion in Church Hymns in 1871, where stanza 1 line 4 was 'Thy praise shall hallow now our rest' and stanza 5 line 3 was 'But stand, and rule, and grow for ever'. It was revised again for Ellerton's Hymns Original and Translated (1888). The 1888 text was used when the hymn was printed in the Supplement (1889) to the Second...

I would not live alway

 I would not live alway. William Augustus Muhlenberg* (1796-1877). A version of this hymn is said to have been written in 1824 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for a lady's album, where it began: I would not live alway; no, no, holy man, Not a day, not an hour, should lengthen my span. This suggests the jeu d'esprit of a young clergyman, although it was based on Job 7: 16: 'I would not live alway: let me alone; for my days are vanity.' The original text had six 8-line stanzas. The text given in...

Hail, gladdening Light, of his pure glory poured

Hail, gladdening Light, of his pure glory poured. Greek, probably 3rd century, translated by John Keble* (1792-1866). The Greek text, of unknown authorship, dates from the early years of the Christian church (see 'Phos hilaron'*). Keble's translation of this simple but profound hymn succeeds in celebrating the glory of God, and Christ as the light of the world, and the lights of evening are symbols of the divine, the 'giver of life, alone'. It was published in the British Magazine, edited by...

Lyra Apostolica

Lyra Apostolica (1836). This collection of hymns contained 179 poems and hymns, which had been previously printed in the British Magazine, a high-church periodical founded in 1832 to counter liberal forces arguing for the reform of the church. It was an ostentatiously Tractarian publication, with an epigraph chosen by John Henry Newman* taken from Homer, 'You shall know the difference now that I am back again'. This suggested that Newman saw the time as one of battle: the quotation is from...

John Stainer

STAINER, (Sir) John. b. Southwark, London, 13 June 1840; d. Verona, Italy, 31 March 1901. A chorister at St Paul's Cathedral (1848-56), he was organist at St Michael's College, Tenbury (1857-9), informator choristarum at Magdalen College, Oxford (1860-72), organist of St Paul's Cathedral (1872-88) and Professor of Music at Oxford (1889-99). He was knighted in 1888. Stainer was also H. M. Inspector of Music in Schools and Training Colleges between 1882 and his death. Stainer is nowadays best...

Gottschalk of Orbais

GOTTSCHALK of Orbais (Gottschalk der Sachse). b. ca. 803, d. 867 or 869. Born to a Saxon count named Berno, Gottschalk was given to the abbey of Fulda as a child oblate. He later challenged the validity of his oblation and petitioned to be released from his monastic vow. Gottschalk was allowed to leave Fulda by decree of a council at Mainz in 829, but Louis the Pious declared the decision void at the request of Hrabanus Maurus*, abbot of Fulda. Gottschalk was then transferred to the abbey of...

Johannes Brugman

BRUGMAN, Johannes (Jan). b. Kempen, the Netherlands, ca. 1400; d. Nijmegen, June 1473. Brugman joined the Order of Friars Minor-Conventual in 's-Hertogenbosch some time between 1420 and 1425, and shortly afterwards entered the studium generale in Paris. He became swept up in the controversy over the interpretation of the rule of St Francis between the Conventual and Observant branches of the Franciscan Order (see Franciscan hymns and hymnals*) in the 1440s. Following the reformation of the...

Winchester Hymnal

Winchester Hymnal (late 10th century). The Winchester Hymnal is a type of New Hymnal (see Medieval hymns and hymnals*) that was introduced during the late 10th-century Anglo-Saxon monastic reform movement called the Benedictine Reform (see 'Rule of Benedict'*). It is one of two types of monastic hymnal known to have been in use in England after the Benedictine Reform, the other being the Canterbury Hymnal*. The Winchester Hymnal is clearly linked to the Benedictine Reform movement because it...

Bind us together, Lord

Bind us together, Lord. Robert (Bob) Gillman* (1946— ).  'Bind us together, Lord' grew out of the controversy that developed over the impact of Pentecostal influences in churches in London during the 1970s, known as the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. Those who had experienced the presence of the gifts of the Spirit wished for congregations with established historical liturgies to allow for more freedom to express these gifts during worship. As a result, a house church movement developed during...

Charlotte Elliott

ELLIOTT, Charlotte. b. Clapham, south London, 18 March 1789; d. Brighton, 22 Sept 1871. Clapham, then a village south of London, was the centre of the Evangelical 'Clapham Sect', and she came of distinguished evangelical lineage. Her mother, Eling Venn, was the eldest daughter of the Reverend Henry Venn, an eminent 18th-century Anglican clergyman. Her uncle, John Venn, was a leading member of the Clapham Sect. Elliott's father, Charles Elliott, a Bond Street merchant, was also a member of the...

Frances Ridley Havergal

HAVERGAL, Frances Ridley. b. Astley, Worcestershire, 14 December 1836; d. Caswell Bay, near Swansea, 3 June 1879. Her father, the musician and hymn tune writer, William Henry Havergal*, was rector of Astley. He became rector of St Nicholas', Worcester, in 1845. Her mother died in 1848, and she was sent to school, first to a private school, Campden Hill House, Belmont, near Hereford, and then (1851) to Powicke Court, near Worcester. In 1852-53, her father, having married again, travelled with...

Devotio Moderna

The Devotio Moderna (Modern Devotion or New Devotion) was a movement of religious revival that started in what is now the Netherlands in the late 14th century. Its main characteristics were an inward-looking piety, asceticism and the fostering of the virtuous life. Its instigator was Geert Grote (1340-1384). After having started an ecclesiastical career, a period of severe illness led to a process of inner conversion (1372). After several years of retreat he re-entered public life in 1379,...

Feminist hymnody

Throughout Christian history, the language and imagery of worship has been overwhelmingly male. Congregations have sung of themselves as 'men' and 'brothers'; apart from Mary the mother of Jesus, references to biblical characters have focused on males; and God has been addressed in terms that emphasise masculinity. For much of this time, the creators and leaders of liturgy have been almost exclusively men. With the rise of 'second wave' feminism in the 1970s, there was a specific move towards...

Dominican hymns and hymnals

The Dominican order was founded by Domingo de Guzman (St. Dominic, ca. 1170-1221), a Spanish priest who emphasised humility and preaching the Gospel in his attempts to persuade Cathar heretics to return to the Roman Catholic church. He gained papal approval in 1216 to found a new order, the Ordo Praedicatorum, based on the rule of St Augustine* and emphasising the importance of preaching and confession. Medieval Dominicans were mendicant preachers and missionaries, often studying theology at...

Wade in the Water

Wade in the Water. African American spiritual*. Wade in the water, wade in the water children, wade in the water, God's gonna trouble the water. Water is an important image in the African American spiritual. 'Deep river'* is a song that finds hope on the other side of the river. 'Go down, Moses'* is a spiritual of deliverance in which Pharaoh's armies were drowned in the sea. Water was a primary aspect of slave experience. Africans began their captivity—the 'middle passage'—by traveling...

Out of the depths to the glory above

Out of the depths to the glory above. Avis Burgeson Christiansen* (1895-1985). Published in Tabernacle Praises No 2, with a tune by Haldor Lillenas* (later given the name LILLENAS in Hymns for the Living Church, 1974, where Christiansen's hymn appears). It is probably better known for its refrain, 'Jesus has lifted me': Out of the depths to the glory above,I have been lifted in wonderful love;From every fetter my spirit is free -  Jesus has lifted me! Jesus has lifted me!Jesus has lifted...

This is the glorious gospel word

This is the glorious gospel word. Thomas Bowman Stephenson* (1839-1912). This hymn was 'called forth by a religious Convention at Brighton' (JJ, p.1093). This must have been before 1875, when it was published in Calvary Songs: a collection of new and choice hymns for Sunday schools and families, edited by Charles S. Robinson* and Theodore E. Perkins (Philadelphia, 1875) to a tune by George F. Weeks. It may well have been published earlier in Britain, and it must have crossed the Atlantic very...

Darley Terry

TERRY, Darley. b. Brighouse, Yorkshire, 19 January 1847; d. Prestatyn, North Wales, 21 January 1933. Terry was a printer at Dewsbury, Yorkshire and a Sunday-school superintendent. He represented Yorkshire on the council of the National Sunday School Union. He was an active member of the Methodist New Connexion, serving on its Sunday schools committee from 1877 to 1899, and on its Young People's and Temperance Department. He is said to have published Poems and Hymns (1904, 1914, second series,...

From heaven you came, helpless babe

From heaven you came, helpless babe. Graham Kendrick* (1950- ). This song is usually known as 'The Servant King'. It was written for the Spring Harvest* event of 1984, 'to explore the vision of Christ as the servant who would wash the disciples' feet but who was also the Creator of the universe'. It has become one of the most popular of Kendrick's songs, and is to be found in almost every book published since that date, including RS, A&MCP, the Irish Church Hymnal and CH4. Kendrick's tune...

Meekness and majesty, manhood and deity

Meekness and majesty, manhood and deity. Graham Kendrick* (1950- ). Written for a Spring Harvest* event, and included in the CD Make Way for the King of Kings — A Carnival of Praise (1986). It moves from the meekness of Christ's washing of the disciples' feet (cf. 'The Servant King': see 'From heaven you came, helpless babe'*) through his crucifixion to his ascension in glory. It has become very popular: beginning with BPW in 1991, it has been included in many subsequent books. Its tune,...

Reginald Thomas Brooks

BROOKS, Reginald Thomas ('Peter'). b. Wandsworth, London, 30 June 1918; d. Harrow, Middlesex, 12 October 1985. He was a student at Mansfield College, Oxford. He was ordained into the Congregational ministry at Skipton, Yorkshire, later moving to Bradford, Yorkshire. In 1950 he joined the religious broadcasting department of the BBC. He is usually known as 'Peter Brooks', a name he preferred (see the Companion to RS, 1999, p. 764). Two of his hymns have become well known: 'O Christ the Lord, O...

Russell Kelso Carter

CARTER, Russell Kelso. b. Baltimore, Maryland, 18 November 1849; d. Catonsville, Maryland, 23 August 1926. Carter graduated from the Pennsylvania Military Academy in 1867, and taught chemistry there (1869-73). Thereafter he had a career of astonishing variety. He moved to California to raise sheep, before returning to his alma mater to teach civil engineering and mathematics (1881-87); he then resigned to become a Methodist minister in 'Holiness camp meetings'. Later he studied medicine and...

Tempus adest floridum

Tempus adest floridum. from Piae Cantiones. This spring carol, translated as 'Spring has now unwrapped the flowers', is one of two in the section entitled 'De Tempore Vernali Cantiones' in Piae Cantiones (Greifswald, 1582). It had four verses, celebrating the return of the flowers that winter had concealed, and praising God for the joyful time of the year ('Gaudeamus igitur tempore iucundo'). See AH 45. 171. The tune is famous in English-speaking countries: it was used by John Mason Neale* for...

Cistercian hymns and hymnals

The Cistercian movement, originating at the beginning of the 12th century, was founded on the desire to return to the rule of St Benedict (see Rule of Benedict*), which gave instructions for the chanting of Ambrosian hymns during the Offices of Nocturn, Lauds and Vespers. Cistercian brothers went to Milan to seek out St Ambrose*'s compositions, returning with a list of hymns. However, because of additions made during the intervening centuries, the Cistercians adopted a mixture of more recent...

Ye gates, lift up your heads on high

Ye gates, lift up your heads on high. Scottish Psalter* (1650). This is the metrical version of Psalm 24: 7-10, traditionally sung in the Church of Scotland at the 'Great Entrance' of the elements at the service of Holy Communion. Because this service was normally held on a few occasions in the year only, it became a moment of high significance. The minister and elders would bring in the bread and wine, and this part of Psalm 24 would be sung. It was to match the solemn grandeur of this...

Catherine Winkworth

WINKWORTH, Catherine. b. London, 13 September 1827; d. Monnetier, France, 1 July 1878. She was the daughter of a silk manufacturer, who moved his family to Manchester in 1829. In common with most young women of the time, she had no formal higher education, but studied German with Tobias Theodores (the first teacher of German at Owens College, Manchester, later the University of Manchester) and Logic with James Martineau*. With her sister Selina, she spent the year 1845-46 in Dresden, living...

Estonian Methodist hymnody

Lauluraamat Piiskoplikule Metodistikirikule Eestis (Tallinn, 1926; The Estonian Methodist Episcopal Hymnal). The Estonian Methodist Episcopal hymnal (cited as ESMEH 1926), like its Lithuanian and Latvian counterparts (see 'Lithuanian Methodist hymnody'* and 'Latvian Methodist hymnody'*), was strongly dependent on the Gesangbuch der Bischöflichen Methodisten Kirche in Deutschland und der Schweiz ('Hymnbook of the German and Swiss Methodist Episcopal Church', Bremen, 1896, cited as GBMK 1896). It...

Norwegian hymnody

Early history and the first hymnody Norwegian language-use and hymnological terminology, while largely concordant with the other Scandinavian languages, differs significantly compared to those of most other languages. The term salme (from the Greek ψάλμος, psalmos) is used to denote both biblical, paraphrasal and other religious strophic verse set to music. This reflects the fact that the psalter in post-Reformation Denmark-Norway gradually disappeared from the service life of the church,...

Danish hymnody

The beginnings of Danish Hymnody date back to the 15th century, partly originating in the lay movements of that time, and partly as a Danish version of the renaissance culture of Northern Europe. Only a few texts have been preserved. Revised versions of some songs to the Holy Virgin and a number of pre-Reformation Christmas and Easter carols were included in hymnals of the Reformation period. Some of these carols are from German sources and are either parallel translations from Latin or...

Boris Ord

ORD, Boris. b. Bristol, 9 July 1897; d. Cambridge, 30 December 1961. The son of Clement Ord, a lecturer in the University of Bristol, and Joanna Anthes, a German, he was christened 'Bernhardt', but was invariably known as 'Boris'. He was educated at Clifton College, Bristol, and the Royal College of Music (1914-1920, interrupted by war service in the Royal Flying Corps). At the RCM he was taught by Walter Parratt*. In 1920 he moved to Cambridge as organ scholar of Corpus Christi College, where...

Ernest Warburton Shurtleff

SHURTLEFF, Ernest Warburton. b. Boston, Massachusetts, 4 April 1862; d. Paris, France, August 1917. He was educated at the Boston Latin School and Harvard University, with a further period of study at the New Church (Swedenborgian) Theological Seminary. He trained for the Congregational ministry at Andover Theological College, graduating in 1888. For the graduation ceremony he wrote the hymn by which he is still known, 'Lead on, O King eternal'*. He subsequently served as a minister at...

I know not where the road will lead

I know not where the road will lead. Evelyn Atwater Cummins* (1891-1971). Written in 1922, this must be one of the first hymns to have been inspired by the radio. Cummins recalled that she was unwell, and unable to attend church, so she listened with earphones to a sermon by Dr Samuel Parkes Cadman (1864-1936, a pioneer religious broadcaster) on the topic of 'The King's Highway'. She continued: 'the title sort of stuck in my head, and so I thought I would put down what the King's Highway meant...

Robert Grant

GRANT, (Sir) Robert. b. Kidderpore, Bengal, India, 15 January 1780; d. Dapoorie, Western India, 9 July 1838. He was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge (BA, 1801, MA, 1804). He became a Fellow of Magdalene College, was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn (1807), and became King's Serjeant in the Court of the Duchy of Lancaster. He became a Member of Parliament in 1818 and a Privy Councillor in 1831, promoting a bill in 1833 for the emancipation of the Jews, which passed the Commons but was...

Gospel Hymns 1 to 6 Complete (1894)

Gospel Hymns Nos. 1 to 6 Complete (1894) (New York: Biglow & Main Company; and Cincinnati: John Church & Company): Gospel Hymns and Sacred Solos by P. P. Bliss and Ira D. Sankey as used by them in Gospel Meetings [No. 1] (1875), No. 2 (1876), No. 3 (1878), No. 4 (1883), No. 5 (1887), No. 6 (1891), Gospel Hymns Nos. 1 to 6 Complete (1894). Beginning with the first Great Awakening ca.1730-60 (see Great Awakenings, USA*), the colonies, and subsequently the USA, have periodically...

First of martyrs, thou whose name

First of martyrs, thou whose name. Jean-Baptiste de Santeuil* (1630-1697), translated perhaps by a friend of Isaac Williams* (1802-1865). This is a translation of Santeuil's 'O qui tuo, dux martyrum', from the Cluniac Breviary (1686) and from his Hymni Sacri et Novi (1689). It appeared in Williams's Hymns translated from the Paris Breviary (1839), with the first line 'Rightful Prince of Martyrs thou'. In the Preface Williams said that the translation was 'supplied by a Friend', whose identity...

Frances Mary Yonge

YONGE, Frances Mary (née Bargus). b.13 January 1795; d. 28 September 1868. She married an army officer, William Yonge, who resigned his commission in 1822 to live with her at Otterbourne, Hampshire, part of the parish of Hursley, where John Keble* was to become vicar in 1836. The Yonge family found Keble's views and practice very congenial, and in imitation of Keble's most famous book, Frances Mary published The Child's Christian Year: Hymns for every Sunday and Holy-day in 1841, with a preface...

Jean-Baptiste de Santeuil

SANTEUIL, Jean-Baptiste de. b. Paris, 12 May 1630; d. Dijon, 5 August 1697. Born into a prosperous Parisian family, Jean-Baptiste de Santeuil became a regular canon of the celebrated Abbaye de Saint Victor in Paris, taking the name 'Santolius Victorinus'. His duties allowed him welcome opportunities for mingling with society, and he gained a reputation as a wit that was reflected, not entirely creditably, in Santeuilliania, a volume of sayings attributed to him that was published, ostensibly at...

F.M. Hamilton

HAMILTON, Fayette Montgomery ('F.M.'). b. Washington, Arkansas, 3 September 1858; d. Sparta, Georgia, 10 November 1912. The life of this hymnodist, composer, arranger, and editor is most accurately told within the context of the early history of the Colored Methodist Episcopal (CME) Church (in 1954 the name was changed to the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church). It was first organized  on 16 December 1870 as The Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, an ecclesial body of mostly African...

Ethiopian hymnody

This account of Ethiopian Hymnody is in two parts: Traditional Hymnody (Ralph Lee); New Songs (Lila Balisky) Traditional Ethiopian Liturgical Music Of all the ecclesiastical arts liturgical singing is the most important and jealously guarded in the Ethiopian Orthodox tradition. No external influences are permitted and the purity of the original tradition is uncompromisingly protected. Music creates the atmosphere of worship: Orthodox believers often comment on the spiritual quality and...

Eric Harding Thiman

THIMAN, Eric Harding. b. Ashford, Kent, 12 September 1900; d. Camden, London, 13 February 1975. The son of a Congregational minister, he was educated at Caterham School and the Guildhall School of Music, becoming FRCO in 1920. He was awarded the DMus degree by London University in 1927. He was Professor of Harmony and Composition at the Royal Academy of Music (1931- ), and Dean of the Faculty of Music, London University (1956-62). He was a noted teacher and recitalist, and an organist at...

Gregory the Great

GREGORY the Great. b. probably in Rome, ca. 540; d. Rome, 12 March 604. Born into a noble Roman family, Gregory was well educated. He became a monk in Rome, having founded a monastery there as well as six in Sicily. Gregory was sent to Constantinople with a diplomatic mission where he remained as 'apocrisiarius' ('ambassador'), and became very popular, from 579 to 585. He was recalled to Rome, and was elected Pope Gregory I in 590. Gregory is said to have seen Anglo-Saxon children in the slave...

Jan Utenhove

UTENHOVE, Jan. b. the Netherlands, ca. 1520; d. London, 6 January 1566. Utenhove was a leading lay Reformer in the Calvinist tradition, born into a Flemish aristocratic family with strong connections with Erasmus. He was obliged to leave Ghent in 1544, almost certainly because of adverse reaction to a play he had written and performed. Thereafter he travelled widely in Europe, staying in Heinrich Bullinger's Zürich, Martin Bucer*'s and Peter Martyr's Strassburg, Thomas Cranmer's London, and...

Malaysian hymnody

Location and Population Malaysia comprises two separate regions, the Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia (Sarawak and Sabah). It is a pluralistic community, comprising of several racial groups, cultures and religions. It has a population of about 28 millions. Malay is the predominant group that makes up about 50.4% of the population, and by the Malaysian Constitutional definition, all Malays are Muslims. The ethnic Chinese make up 23.7% of the population. They are economically active in...

O Christ our Joy, gone up on high

O Christ our joy, gone up on high.  David Thomas Morgan* (1809-1886). From Morgan's Hymns of the Latin Church (privately printed, 1871). It was a translation of the Latin verses beginning 'Tu Christe nostrum gaudium'*, which formed the second part of 'Aeterne Rex altissime'*. Although Morgan's book was privately printed, it must have come to the attention of the compilers of the Second Edition of A&M, because it was included there for Ascensiontide, before being reprinted in Morgan's...

¡Gloria, gloria, gloria!

¡Gloria, gloria, gloria! Pablo Sosa* (1933—2020).  This joyful chorus comes directly from Luke 2: 14, the canticle of the angels. 'Gloria' (1978) was composed for a Christmas pageant, designed so that the congregation could join in the drama as the chorus of angels. The song-dance is based on the cueca, the national dance of Chile, but also popular in Bolivia and parts of Argentina. The musical style includes a lively three-four (¾) meter melded with a cross-rhythm of six-eight (6/8)...

Nicolai Frederik Severin Grundtvig

GRUNDTVIG, Nicolai Frederik Severin. b. Udby, 8 September 1783; d. 2 September 1872. Born in a small village in South Zealand, Udby, where his father had been priest since 1778. The small boy remembered news of the revolution in France arriving in the village in 1789, but he seems to have been more impressed in the previous year (when he was five years old) by the news that the Russian troops on the Black Sea coast were advancing south and hoped to be in Constantinople by Easter:...

John Quarles

QUARLES, John. b. (?) London, 1624 or 1625; d. London, 1665. The precise dates of John Quarles's birth and death are unknown. He was the son of Francis Quarles*, and probably born in London before his father took the family to Ireland on becoming secretary to Archbishop Ussher of Armagh (on whom John wrote an elegy in 1655). John Quarles entered Exeter College, Oxford, in 1643, finding himself there in the middle of the Civil War, when Oxford was a stronghold of the King. John is believed to...

Ye servants of a martyr'd God

Ye servants of a martyr'd God. Robert Campbell* (1814-1868). This is Campbell's translation of the martyrs' form of 'Aeterna Christi munera'*, continuing 'Et martyrum victorias', possibly by Ambrose of Milan* (339/40-397). It was published in Campbell's Hymns and Anthems for Use in the Holy Services of the Church within the United Diocese of St Andrews, Dunkeld, and Dunblane (Edinburgh, 1850). It was used by the compilers of A&M (1904) to make a hymn that began like other translations 'The...

Come and taste, along with me

Come and taste, along with me. John Leland* (1754–1841).  This hymn was entitled 'The Christian's Consolation'. It was probably first published in 1801, in at least three collections: Richard Allen*, A Collection of Hymns and Spiritual Songs: from various authors (Philadelphia: T. L. Plowman, 1801); Richard Allen, A Collection of Spiritual Songs and Hymns (Philadelphia: John Ormrod, 1801); and Josiah Goddard, A New and Beautiful Collection of Select Hymns and Spiritual Songs (Walpole, New...

If when you give the best of your service

If when you give the best of your service (He Understands; He'll Say, ''Well Done''). Lucie Eddie Campbell-Williams* (1885-1963). This was composed in 1933 for the annual gathering of the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc., and quickly became one of the all-time Convention favorites. African American scholar Horace Clarence Boyer* notes:  From 1930 to 1962, [Campbell] introduced a new song each year at the National Baptist Convention. Her songs became gospel standards, sung by all...

Johann Sebastian Bach

BACH, Johann Sebastian. b. Eisenach, 21 March 1685; d. Leipzig, 28 July 1750. He was the most important member of a Thuringian family of musicians, whose technical accomplishment as a performer was revered by his contemporaries, and whose genius as a composer was not only recognized during his own time but has significantly influenced the development of Western music. He was born in Eisenach and attended the local Latin school, the same one that Martin Luther* had attended two hundred years...

Percy Dearmer

DEARMER, Percy. b. London, 27 February 1867; d. Westminster, London, 29 May 1936. He was born of French (probably Huguenot) descent, the son of a painter who knew Charles Dickens. He was educated at various schools, including Westminster (1880-81) and the Lutheran school at Vevey in Switzerland, and then at Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1889, MA 1896). In those years he encountered two important influences: high churchmanship at Pusey House, including the friendship of Charles Gore; and work among...

Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart

Be thou my vision, O Lord of my heart. Irish, 8th century, translated by Mary E. Byrne* (1880-1931), versified by Eleanor Hull* (1860-1935). This text is found in two manuscripts in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin, dating possibly from the 8th century, one a poor copy of the other. The Irish text begins: Rop tú ma baile a Choimdiu cride: ní ní nech aile acht Rí secht nime. It had sixteen 2-line verses, many beginning 'Rop tú' ('Be thou'). The verses were translated by Mary...

George Herbert

HERBERT, George. b. Montgomery, 3 April 1593; d. Bemerton, near Salisbury, 1 March 1633. Born of a noble family at Montgomery Castle, he was one of seven sons and three daughters. He was educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1613, MA and Fellow of the College, 1616). In 1618 he was appointed Reader in Rhetoric at Cambridge and was Public Orator to the University, 1620-28. He represented Montgomery in parliament in 1624 and 1625, and appeared to be on the threshold of...

Henry Williams Baker

BAKER, (Sir) Henry Williams. b. London, 27 May 1821; d. Monkland, Herefordshire, 12 February 1877. The son of Vice-Admiral Sir Henry Loraine Baker and Louisa Anne Williams (from whose family came his second forename), he was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1844, MA, 1847). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1844, priest 1846), and after serving a curacy at Great Horkesley, Essex, he was presented to the living of Monkland, Herefordshire in 1851. He succeeded to the Baronetcy on the death of...

Benjamin Rhodes

RHODES, Benjamin. b. Mexborough, Yorkshire, 1743, date unknown; d. Margate, Kent, 13 October 1815. He was the son of a schoolmaster, who gave him a good education. At the age of 11 he was much influenced by hearing George Whitefield* preach, and in 1766 he became one of 'Mr Wesley's preachers', serving until his death at Margate. In the obituary in the Minutes of the Methodist Conference he was described as 'a man of great simplicity and integrity of mind; he was warmly and invariably attached...

Book of Praise, The

The Book of Praise  (1862) This influential anthology of hymns was the work of Roundell Palmer*, a distinguished politician and man of letters. Its full title was The Book of Praise from the best English Hymn Writers. It was published by Macmillan in London and Cambridge in 1862. The frontispiece showed a picture of David with his harp, to emphasise the continuity of tradition between the great psalmist and contemporary hymn writers. The book was very successful, and there were many further...

Gottfried Arnold

ARNOLD, Gottfried. b. Annaberg, Saxony, 5 Sept 1666; d. Perleberg, Brandenburg, 30 May 1714. He was educated at the Gymnasium at Gera followed by the University of Wittenberg (1685-89). He became a private tutor to a family at Dresden, where he was much influenced by the sermons of Philipp Jakob Spener*, then Senior Court Preacher (until 1690). On Spener's recommendation Arnold obtained another tutor's post at Quedlinburg (1693-97); while at Quedlinburg he published Die erste Liebe, das ist,...

God who created me

God who created me. Henry Charles Beeching* (1859-1919).  This exuberant hymn comes from Beeching's In a Garden, and other Poems (1895). It seems to have been used as a hymn first in the Sunday School Hymnary (1905), edited by Carey Bonner*, and subsequently in the Boys' Brigade Hymnal (1922), the 1919 edition of The Public School Hymn Book, edited by Geoffrey Shaw, SofP (1925), RCH (1927) and SofPE (1931). In the USA it appealed to H. Augustine Smith*, who included it in the American Student...

Love divine, all loves excelling

Love divine, all loves excelling. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns for those that seek and those that have Redemption in the Blood of Jesus Christ (1747) in four 8-line stanzas, and reprinted in Select Hymns with Tunes Annext (1761). It also appeared, with alterations, in Martin Madan*'s Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1760), and in Toplady*'s collection with the same title of 1776 (Toplady's Psalms and Hymns*). The second stanza was omitted in John Wesley*'s Hymns for...

Lizzie DeArmond

DeARMOND, Lizzie (Elizabeth Douglas Foulks DeArmond). b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 23 July 1847; d. Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, 26 October 1936. She was a prolific writer of gospel songs and hymns, of which the best known is 'If your heart keeps right'*, beginning 'If the dark shadows gather'.  Little is known about Lizzie DeArmond's parents.  The US Federal Census for 1850 indicates that her father was Charles F. Foulks (1825?- nda), a druggist in Philadelphia, and that her mother was Matty...

William James Mathias

MATHIAS, William James. b. Whitland, Pembrokeshire, 1 Nov 1934; d. Anglesey, 29 July 1992. Mathias studied at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth and at the Royal Academy of Music with Sir Lennox Berkeley. He established himself as one of the most distinctive and accessible composers of his generation and became particularly celebrated for his church and choral music. In 1981 he composed an anthem 'Let the People Praise Thee, O God' (Psalm 67) — for the Wedding in St. Paul's Cathedral...

Lutheran hymns and hymnals, USA

Immigration and Organization Danish Lutherans came to Hudson Bay in 1619 with Rasmus Jensen (d. 1620) and probably Den danske Psalmebog (Copenhagen, 1569) of Hans Thomissøn (1532-73) (see Danish hymnody*). Within a year they died or returned home. Lutherans from the Netherlands came to New York City in 1623. In 1657 when Johannes Gutwasser (fl. 1650s) led services, he was arrested by the Reformed authorities and in 1659 sent home. Swedish Lutherans came in 1638 to the Delaware River with...

The great Physician now is near

The great Physician now is near. William Hunter* (1811-1877). Published in Hunter's Songs of Devotion (Pittsburgh, 1859), entitled 'Christ the Physician'. Stanzas 4, 5 and 7 of the original have been omitted in many books, including the Baptist Hymnal (various editions). Reynolds (1976) quotes the three stanzas: 4. The children too, both great and small, Who love the name of Jesus, May now accept the gracious call To work and live for Jesus. 5. Come, brethren, help...

George James Webb

WEBB, George James. b. near Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, 24 June 1803; d. Orange, New Jersey, 7 October 1887.  One of the leading musicians of Boston, Massachusetts between 1830 and 1860, Webb composed the hymn tune WEBB (also called MORNING LIGHT, GOODWIN, and STAND UP), often sung to George Duffield*'s* hymn, 'Stand up! Stand up for Jesus'*. George James Webb's parents, James Millett Webb (1772?-1848) and Isabella Ann Archer (nda), were married at St Margaret's Church, near Westminster...

Homer A. Rodeheaver

RODEHEAVER, Homer Alvin [Alvan]. b. near Union Furnace, Ohio, 4 October 1880; d. Winona Lake, Indiana, 18 December 1955. A gospel song composer, musical evangelist, publisher, early recording artist, and compiler of convention collections, 'Rody', as he was called, is remembered today primarily for his association with evangelist Billy Sunday (1862–1935) where he charmed revival goers with his baritone voice and entertaining trombone playing. Early Life   The third son of Thurman Hall...

Henry Purcell

PURCELL, Henry. b. London, perhaps Westminster, [autumn] 1659; d. Westminster, 21 November 1695. A Child of the Chapel Royal, he was educated at a time when choirs in England were being revived during the Restoration of Charles II (after the proscription of choirs and organs in church during the Commonwealth under Cromwell). He may have been taught by John Blow and Pelham Humfrey. His gifts were evident early, and after his voice broke in 1673 he was kept on at court as an assistant to John...

All glory, laud and honour

All glory, laud and honour. Theodulf of Orleans* (ca. 760- ca. 821), translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This is a translation of the Latin hymn, 'Gloria, laus et honor'*, attributed to St Theodulf (or Theodulph), who was bishop of Orleans, France. During the reign of Louis I (the son of Charlemagne), Theodulf was imprisoned in Angers for some time beginning in 818. According to Clichtoveus in his Elucidatorium Ecclesiasticum (Paris, 1516), the imprisoned bishop sang the hymn from his...

Episcopal Church, USA, hymnody

Episcopal Church Hymnody, USA The Introduction is by Raymond F. Glover. The historical survey is by Robin Knowles Wallace. Introduction Among the vast number of persons who came as settlers beginning in 1607 to what is now known as the United States of America were many who brought with them a pattern of worship consistent with the liturgies of the Book of Common Prayer, the singing of metrical Psalms from the 'Old Version'* of Thomas Sternhold* and John Hopkins*, perhaps a few hymns of...

Gentle Mary laid her child

Gentle Mary laid her child. Joseph Simpson Cook* (1859-1933). Cook penned the 'The Xmas Child' in an accounts ledger dated 1917 which he used as a notebook for his poetry. The text in his personal papers opens with 'Gentle Mary wrapped her child/Lowly in a manger'. It seems to have been adopted quickly by United Church of Canada congregations. Alexander MacMillan, editor of The Hymnary (1930) could comment within five years on the fact that 'this lyric is already welcomed and sung at the...

Let us with a gladsome mind

Let us with a gladsome mind. John Milton* (1608-1674). Together with a metrical version of Psalm 114, this paraphrase of Psalm 136 was published in Poems of Mr John Milton, Both English and Latin (1645). A note before Psalm 114 read: 'This and the following Psalm were don by the Author at fifteen yeeres old', which dates them at 1623 or 1624. This one had 24 verses, each ending 'For his mercies ay endure/ Ever faithfull, ever sure.' A six-verse selection was printed by Josiah Conder* in The...

I am a poor wayfaring stranger (Going over Jordan)

I am a poor wayfaring stranger (Going over Jordan). Traditional American. There are many congregational songs which contain tropes of 'wayfarer', 'stranger', 'traveler/traveling' or, 'pilgrim', while 'Jordan' as the symbol for crossing over from this life to the next recurs throughout hymnody (see, for example, 'On Jordan's stormy banks I stand'*, 'Guide me, O thou great Jehovah (Redeemer)*, 'Swing low, sweet chariot'*). This essay draws upon the excellent essay by John Garst (Garst, 1980, pp....

Schönster Herr Jesu

Schönster Herr Jesu.  German, 17th century.  This hymn was printed in a Münster Gesangbuch of 1677, a Roman Catholic hymnbook (Münster was a Catholic city). It must have become popular, in the manner of a folk-song, because, according to The Hymnal 1940 Companion, it was recorded in 1839 by August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben (1798-1874) in the district of Glaz in Silesia. With Ernst Friedrich Richter (1808-1879) Hoffmann von Fallersleben edited a collection of Silesian folk-songs,...

Above the clear blue sky

Above the clear blue sky. John Chandler* (1806-1876). First published in Chandler's The Hymns of the Church, mostly Primitive (1841). It is one of the few hymns by Chandler that are not translations. It appeared in the Second Edition of A&M (1875) in the section 'For the Young', and was at one time very well known: JJ described its use as 'somewhat extensive' (p.8): Above the clear blue sky,In heaven's bright abode,The Angel host on highSing praises to their God:       Alleluia!  They...

Heralds of Christ

    Heralds of Christ. Laura L. Copenhaver* (1868-1940).  Laura Copenhaver was scheduled to speak for a conference in Northfield, Massachusetts in the summer of 1894. For personal reasons she could not attend. She wrote the poem 'The King's Highway' and sent it to the conference asking, according to her daughter Eleanor Copenhaver Sherwood, that it be 'accepted in my place' (Reynolds, 1964, p. 66).  Robert Guy McCutchan*, Methodist hymnologist and pastor, cited the author's own...

Nine Lessons and Carols

This is the traditional pattern in Britain and elsewhere for a Carol Service. The basic template was laid down at King's College, Cambridge, beginning in 1918. The Dean of King's, Eric Milner-White, had been a chaplain in the army during World War I, which had ended a month earlier, and was seeking for a Christmas service that would appeal to many people. He based the service on one devised at Truro by Edward White Benson*, ca. 1880, which was the true beginning of the tradition. It was...

Robert Campbell

CAMPBELL, Robert. b. Trochaig, Ayrshire, 19 December 1814; d. Edinburgh, 29 December 1868. He was educated at the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, becoming a lawyer. He began life as a member of the Church of Scotland, but became an Episcopalian and later (1852) a Roman Catholic. Before conversion to Catholicism he had shown strong signs of Anglo-Catholic tendencies. A poem or hymn entitled 'King Charles the Martyr' began:  What tears may wash the guilt away,That stained our land this...

The earth is yours

The earth is yours.  Michael Saward* (1932-2015). Written in 1971 at Beckenham, Kent, one of no fewer than eight psalm paraphrases written in one evening, Christmas Eve, following the broadcast of the service of Nine Lessons and Carols* from King's College, Cambridge. This is a harvest hymn based on Psalm 65: 9-13. It was published in Psalm Praise (1973), and subsequently in more than twenty books. It uses the Short Metre effectively and simply to give thanks for seed-time, growth, and...

Brethren, we have met to worship

Brethren, we have met to worship. George Askins* (d. 1816).  Recent research by Richard Hulan* has clarified the authorship of this hymn and its early sources. Credit for the first printing goes to John J. Harrod who included it in his Social and Camp-Meeting Hymns for the Pious (Baltimore, 1817), a year after Askins' death (Steel and Hulan, 2010, p. 67). It is possible that it was published in an earlier collection during Askins' lifetime, but this cannot be verified. In a parallel course of...

David McK. Williams

WILLIAMS, David McKinley.  b. Caernarvonshire, Wales, 20 February 1887; d. Oakland, California, 13 March 1978.  One of the most dynamic 20th-century leaders of American church music, he is often identified with the music of St Bartholomew's Church in New York City, where he was organist and choirmaster from 1920 to 1947.  Williams served on the Joint Commission on Church Music of the Episcopal Church and the Joint Commission on Revision of the Hymnal (H40).  He composed hymn tunes and descants,...

Byzantine hymnody

See also 'Byzantine rite'*, 'Greek hymnody'*, 'Rite of Constantinople'*, 'Rite of Jerusalem'*, 'Greek hymns, archaeology'*. This is a highly sophisticated and powerful literary tradition of religious poetry intended for the liturgical services of the Eastern Orthodox Church and for private, devotional purposes. Profoundly doctrinal, Byzantine hymnody mirrored the major developments in Christology and Trinitarian theology throughout the first millennium of Christianity. At the same time, it was...

Lining out

'Lining out' was the practice of having the minister or clerk sing a line of a psalm, which was then repeated by the congregation. It was a natural consequence of the seriousness attached to public worship by the Puritan element of the Church of England, which not only followed the precepts of Jean Calvin* in preferring psalms over hymns in divine service, but also tried to insist that the people sang them, line by line, and understood what they were singing. Following the execution of...

Italian hymnody

[This entry is in two parts: the first by Blake Wilson, the second by Marzio Pieri] Lauda (plural Laude) The origins of the Lauda* are bound up with the literary origins of the Italian language itself. The roots of the tradition can be traced to the 'Cantico di frate sole'* ('Canticle of the Sun') by St Francis of Assisi (ca. 1181/2-1226), beginning Altissimu, onnipotente bon Signore/tue so le laude, la gloria, et l'onore. Francis urged his followers to 'go through the world preaching...

Sacred Songs and Solos

Sacred Songs and Solos. This is the name given to a collection compiled ca. 1873 by the evangelist-musician team of Dwight L. Moody* and Ira D. Sankey* for use in England during their first revivals abroad. The hymnal ultimately grew into a bestselling volume of 1,200 hymns that remains in print today. Sankey notes in his autobiography that he brought along his pump organ and a scrapbook of gospel songs by American revival musicians Philip P. Bliss*, Philip Phillips* and others that he had...

Come unto me, ye weary

Come unto me, ye weary. William Chatterton Dix* (1837-1889). This hymn appeared in The People's Hymnal (1867) and in 1875 it was taken into the Second Edition of A&M. Several tunes were used, including COME UNTO ME, which John Bacchus Dykes* wrote to accompany it in A&M. It is said that the hymn was written at a time when Dix was suffering from illness and depression, and that he looked on its composition as the turning-point which led to his recovery. The hymn has much in common with...

Caroline Maria Noel

NOEL, Caroline Maria. b. Teston, Kent, 10 April 1817; d. Marylebone, London, 7 December 1877. She was the daughter of a Church of England clergyman. She wrote her first hymn at the age of 17. She suffered from ill-health for much of her life, but wrote a number of hymns which were published in The Name of Jesus, and other Verses for the Sick and Lonely (1861, enlarged edition, 1870). Some of them were written for the public services of the church, but the majority were for private meditation or...

Father, whose everlasting love

Father, whose everlasting love. Charles Wesley* (1707-88). First published in Hymns on God's Everlasting Love (1741) in seventeen 4-line stanzas. It was printed in full in the Arminian Magazine, 1788, but not in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the use of the People called Methodists (1780), to which it was added in 1808. It is usually shortened to five or six stanzas. The occasion for the writing and printing of Hymns on God's Everlasting Love was to make clear the Wesleys' opposition...

Father of heaven, whose love profound

Father of heaven, whose love profound. Edward Cooper* (1770-1833). This appeared in A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Use (Uttoxeter, 1805), and Cooper's own compilation, A Selection of Psalms and Hymns (Lichfield, 1811). Between these two it was included in another Staffordshire book, Portions of the Psalms, chiefly selected from the versions of Merrick & Watts, with Occasional Hymns, adapted to the Service of the Church, for every Sunday in the year (Uttoxeter,...

Jerusalem, my happy home

Jerusalem, my happy home. Author unknown, ca. 1580. This hymn exists in many versions, most of which come from two sources: British Library Add. MS 15, 225. This is a text of 26 4-line verses, described as 'A Song Mad (i.e. 'made') by F:B:P.'. The initials may have referred to a Roman Catholic priest (the 'P' standing for 'Pater') persecuted and perhaps imprisoned during the reign of Elizabeth I. For various theories, see 'F.B.P.'*. A poem entitled 'Hymn on the New Jerusalem', by 'W. P.',...

Our Savior bowed beneath the wave

Our Savior bowed beneath the wave. Adoniram Judson* (1788-1850). These are the first three stanzas of a hymn by Judson in seven stanzas that first appeared in Thomas Ripley's A Selection of Hymns, for Conference & Prayer Meetings, and Other Occasions, Second Edition (1831) under the title 'Hymn written by Mr. Judson, Missionary; and sung at the baptism of several soldiers, at Maulmein, British Pegu' (Music and Richardson, 2008, p. 170). For the text of the first three stanzas, see the...

Jubilate Hymns

The British Jubilate Group* was founded in November 1980 as a limited liability company with the title Jubilate Hymns Ltd. It still retains its legal title but is now commonly known as the Jubilate Group. Prior to their adoption of the Jubilate name, a team, chiefly of young Anglican clergy led by Michael Baughen*, later Bishop of Chester, began in the early 1960s to write hymn texts and tunes, initially for the church youth groups for whom they had pastoral responsibility. They were...

Litany hymns

The Litany is a form of prayer consisting of a series of petitions to which the people make set responses. It is thought to have originated in Antioch during the 4th century but soon spread to Constantinople and Rome. Pope Gelasius (492-96) introduced a Litany into the Mass of which the ninefold Kyrie eleison* alone survives. Two hundred years later the pattern of Litany for the Western Church throughout the Middle Ages was established under Pope Sergius in The Litany of the Saints. Its second...

Richard Wagner

WAGNER, (Wilhelm) Richard. b. Leipzig, 22 May 1813; d. Venice, 13 February 1883. Raised as the son of a police actuary, Carl Friedrich Wagner, he may in fact have been the son of the actor and painter, Ludwig Geyer, who looked after the boy's welfare after Carl Friedrich died in November 1813. His education in Leipzig began to reveal at an early stage his interest in drama and music, and at Leipzig University he studied intensively for about six months in 1831 under the Kantor of the...

In allen meinen Taten

In allen meinen Taten. Paul Fleming* (1609-1640). Written on the eve of Fleming's first journey to Riga, Novgorod and Moscow. It was originally entitled 'Nach des VI Psalmens Weise', and dated '1633 November'. The anxiety of Psalm 6 emerges in the hymn's verse 2, 'mein Sorgen ist umsonst' ('My sorrow is in vain'), but the hymn also reflects the comfort of the psalm in verses 8-9. The protector is Christ (in the original verse 7, not included in EG). While beginning in the manner of Psalm 6, the...

Maurice Frost

FROST, Maurice. b. Woodridings, Pinner, Middlesex, 22 June 1888; d. Deddington, Oxfordshire, 25 December 1961. He never knew his father, Maurice Isaac Scott, a clerk, who married Bessie or Eliza, née Wallace. On 8 January 1888, his father had been run over by a goods train at Pinner (now Hatch End) station and killed instantly. Maurice attended Reading School as a boarder, entered Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, as a sizar (a student receiving assistance from the college) in 1907, earned a...

Rise up, O men of God

Rise up, O men of God. William Pierson Merrill* (1867-1954). Written in 1911 for the Presbyterian Brotherhood Movement at the suggestion of Nolan R. Best, editor of the Presbyterian newspaper, The Continent. It was also influenced by an article by Gerald Stanley Lee entitled 'The Church of the Strong Men'. Merrill said that he wrote it on a Lake Michigan steamer on the way to his church in Chicago 'almost without thought and effort'. It was published in The Continent, 16 February 1911, and...

The fish in wave and bird on wing

The fish in wave and bird on wing. Latin, translated by John Chandler* (1806-1876). In Chandler's Hymns of the Primitive Church (1837), this was one of the daily hymns for Nocturn on Thursday. It was a translation of 'Iisdem create fluctibus', beginning in Chandler's version 'The deep a two-fold offspring bore': Iisdem creati fluctibus Pisces natant, volant aves: Utrumque mortali genus Paratur esca corpori. Chandler's translation was much altered by the compilers of the First Edition of...

William Jones of Nayland

JONES, William.  b. Lowick, Northamptonshire, 30 July 1726; d. Nayland, Suffolk, 6 January 1800. He was educated at Charterhouse School and University College, Oxford (BA 1749), after which he took Holy Orders (deacon 1749, priest 1751). He served curacies at Finedon, and then Wadenhoe, both in  Northamptonshire, before becoming the incumbent of Bethersden, Kent (1754-55) and then Pluckley, Kent (1755-77). In 1777 he moved to Nayland in Suffolk as Perpetual Curate, from which his many...

Bulgarian hymnody

See also 'Byzantine hymnody'*, 'Byzantine rite'*, 'Greek hymnody'*, 'Rite of Constantinople'*, 'Rite of Jerusalem'*, 'Greek hymns, archaeology'*. The earliest period The Bulgarians officially accepted Christianity under Tsar Boris I in 865, and were granted an autonomous archbishopric in 870, whose seat was in Pliska. This archbishopric was under the jurisdiction of Constantinople, from where the first hierarch, clergy, and theological and liturgical books naturally came. The very early...

Canterbury Hymnal

The Canterbury Hymnal is a type of New Hymnal (see Medieval hymns and hymnals*) that was apparently introduced at Canterbury during the late 10th-century Anglo-Saxon monastic reform movement called the Benedictine Reform (see 'Rule of Benedict'*). It is one of two types of monastic hymnal known to have been in use in England after the Benedictine Reform, the other being the Winchester Hymnal*. All information about the Canterbury Hymnal must be deduced from the hymnals themselves, since other...

Dies irae, dies illa

Dies irae, dies illa. Latin sequence*, author uncertain, possibly Franciscan. This chant (Liber usualis,  1810–13) is one of only four Sequences to have been preserved in the Roman rite after the Council of Trent (1543-63). Dreves identifies the lyric text as a pia meditatio — a rhymed verse or a reading-song (Leselied) — that served as a sequence once it became part of the Roman liturgy (Dreves, 1892, p. 523). The Roman Missal prescribes its performance for the Mass of All Souls' Day [In...

Kyrie eleison

Kyrie eleison. 'Kyrie eleison' has been a supplication since pre-Christian times, particularly in the imperial cultus, in which the emperor was referred to as kyrios. This Greek text, which translates as 'Lord have mercy' is used, in Greek, in many churches beyond the Greek-speaking world, including the Coptic*, Ethiopian*, West Syrian* and Roman Catholic churches. It is translated into the vernacular in the Armenian*, Romanian* and Nestorian Syrian churches, as well as in many protestant...

Milanese hymns

Milanese hymns. The hymns of Ambrose of Milan* were sung in the Milanese Church from the end of the 4th century onwards, and were quickly diffused in the West (cf. AVG. conf. 9,7,15 ; PAVL. MED. vita Ambr. 13), but nothing leads one to suppose that a Liber hymnorum was compiled during Ambrose's lifetime. The oldest preserved witnesses of the Milanese, or 'Ambrosian', hymnal are no older than the last third of the 9th century. These are the psalter-hymnals Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibl., Clm....

Benjamin Britten

BRITTEN, (Edward) Benjamin. b. Lowestoft, Suffolk, 22 November 1913; d. Aldeburgh, Suffolk, 4 December 1976. Britten was educated at South Lodge Preparatory School, Lowestoft, and at Gresham's School, Holt, Norfolk, before winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Music in 1930 where his composition tutor was John Ireland*. From 1927, however, he was taught privately by Frank Bridge and these lessons continued throughout his years at the College, where he was also taught the piano by Arthur...

I Want to be Ready (Walk in Jerusalem)

I want to be ready (Walk in Jerusalem). African American spiritual*.  Heaven is a prevalent theme in the spirituals. Enslaved Africans longed for heaven—'Deep river*, my home is over Jordan'. They imagined what heaven would be like—'I've got a robe, you've got a robe, / All God's children got a robe'. They were going to celebrate with Jesus in heaven—'I'm gonna sit [eat] at the welcome table'. They were vigilant in watching for heaven—'Keep your lamps trimmed and burning, / the time is drawing...

And let our bodies part

And let our bodies part. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). From Volume II of Charles Wesley's Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), where it was hymn CCXXXIII, entitled 'At Parting'. It was XLIII in the section entitled 'Hymns for Christian Friends'. It was in two parts: Part I had six 8-line stanzas, Part II four stanzas. Part I was printed, with slight alterations, by John Wesley* in A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780) in 12 four-line stanzas, in the section 'For the...

A.F. Lvov

LVOV, Alexei Fyodorovich. b. 5 June 1798, Reval (now Tallinn), Estonia; d. Kovno (Now Kaunus), Lithuania, 28 December 1870. Lvov was the son of Prince Fyodor Petrovich Lvov, the director of music at the Court Chapel at St Petersburg. He served as an officer in the Imperial army, rising to the rank of General, and becoming an aide-de-camp to the Tsar. He succeeded his father as musical director at St Petersburg in 1837, remaining in post until 1861, when he was forced to retire owing to...

Arise, your light is come

Arise, your light is come. Ruth C. Duck* (1947- ). This is one of Duck's earliest hymns, published in Because We Are One People (Chicago: Ecumenical Women's Center, 1974). It is based on verses from Isaiah 60 and 61. She has said that it was inspired by 'Lead on, O King eternal'* and 'Rise up, O men of God'*, presumably in the sense that these texts, the latter especially, offended her and caused her to write an inclusive text (see Wootton, 2010, p. 264). It was included by Erik Routley* in...

As the fainting deer cries out

As the fainting deer cries out. David George Preston* (1939- ). This version of Psalm 42 was one of the last texts written for The Book of Praises: 70 Psalms for singing today, which the author compiled in 1986. It was paired from then on with his version of Psalm 43, 'God defend me; traitors rise'. As the two Psalms have much in common, including their refrain, and because they may have been a single song which was later divided, Preston has rendered them in the same 7777D metre and given...

Charles Sylvester Horne

HORNE, Charles Sylvester. b. Cuckfield, Sussex, 15 April 1865; d. near Toronto, Canada, 2 May 1914. He was educated at the Grammar School at Newport, Shropshire and the University of Glasgow (MA, 1886). He trained for the Congregational ministry at Mansfield College, Oxford (1886-89), where he was one of the first intake of students. He became minister of Allen Street Congregational Chapel, Kensington, London, and in 1903 moved to Whitefield's Tabernacle, Tottenham Court Road, where he...

Come and find the quiet centre

Come and find the quiet centre. Shirley Erena Murray* (1931-). This hymn, a favourite among North American congregations, was originally written in 1989 for a New Zealand Presbyterian Women's Conference whose theme was 'Making Space'. There it was sung to a Gaelic folk melody from the island of Lewis, also used in the Scottish CH4. When it was published in Shirley Murray's first major American collection, In Every Corner, Sing: The Hymns of Shirley Erena Murray (1992), it was set to a serene...

Henry Fothergill Chorley

CHORLEY, Henry Fothergill. b. Blackley Hurst, near Billinge, Lancashire, 15 December 1808; d. London, 16 February 1872. He was the son of Quaker parents: his father was an iron-worker and lock-maker who died when he was a child, after which the family moved to Liverpool. Chorley was educated at the school of the Royal Institution there. After a frustrating time as a clerk in Liverpool, he began in 1830 to send articles to The Athenaeum, and in 1833 he moved to London to be a member of the...

Judge eternal, throned in splendour

Judge eternal, throned in splendour. Henry Scott Holland* (1847-1918). Headed 'Prayer for the Nation', this hymn first appeared in the Christian Social magazine edited by Holland, Commonwealth, in July 1902, and then in EH (1906). The only hymn written by Holland, it reflects his concern for social reform and for justice both at home and abroad: as one of the founders of the Christian Social Union, Holland actively campaigned for social reform throughout his life, and his hymn calls on God...

Michael Field

'FIELD, Michael'. 'Michael Field' was the pseudonym of Katherine Harris Bradley (1846-1914, 'Michael') and Edith Emma Cooper (1862-1913, 'Henry'), aunt and niece lovers who jointly published poetry and drama at the end of the 19th century. Bradley and her widowed mother had moved into the household of her older sister, Emma Harris Bradley, and her husband, James Robert Cooper, around the time of the birth of Edith, and Bradley took charge of her niece after Emma became an invalid following the...

Non nobis Domine

Non nobis Domine. Latin, date unknown. The phrase 'Non nobis Domine' comes from the Vulgate (Psalm 113: 9). In the 1611 translation of the Bible, the King James Version, it opens Psalm 115 ('Not unto us, not unto us, O Lord'): the Latin phrase appears at the head of that Psalm in the Book of Common Prayer. It is a prayer of thanksgiving for some great achievement which avoids the sin of pride by ascribing the credit to God. The phrase begins 'Non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam'. It...

O Christ our joy, to whom is given

O Christ our joy, to whom is given. Laurence Housman* (1865-1959). This is a translation of an early Latin hymn 'Tu Christe nostrum gaudium'*, itself the second part, for use at Lauds, of the hymn beginning 'Aeterne Rex altissime'* (other translations of 'Aeterne Rex altissime' include that by James Russell Woodford* ('Christ, above all glory seated'*) and J.M. Neale*'s 'Eternal Monarch, King most high'*). The hymn celebrates the Ascension, asking for help in this present life, and looking...

Paul the Deacon

Paul the Deacon [Paul of Friuli]. b. ca. 730; d. Montecassino ca. 799. Of noble Italian birth, Paul the Deacon was educated at the court of King Rachis at Pavia before becoming attached to the court of Duke Arichis of Benevento. He entered the monastery of Montecassino after the Carolingian conquest of Italy (773-4). His letter (782) to Charlemagne, petitioning for the release of his brother Arichis, a Lombard prisoner, brought him to the attention of the Frankish king, who summoned Paul the...

Richard of Chichester

RICHARD of Chichester, St. b. Droitwich (Wyche), Worcestershire, ca. 1197; d. Dover, 3 April 1253. Born Richard Wyche (at Wyche), he was educated at either Oxford or Paris, probably the former, where he was 'regent' in arts and then in canon law, and where ca. 1235 he was elected Chancellor of the University. He left, ca. 1236 to become Chancellor to (Saint) Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury. Rich, who died in 1240, was in disfavour with the king, Henry III, who attempted to seize church...

See how the mounting sun

See how the mounting sun. Elizabeth Scott* (1708–1776). Elizabeth Scott's most widely sung hymn, 'A Morning Hymn', appears in the manuscript collection, Hymns and Poems by Elizabeth Scott*. In a modern numbering of those 90 hymns and poems, this hymn is indexed as H31. A transcription of H31 showing Scott's heading, spelling (some of which are idiosyncratic), punctuation, and capitalizations follows below. Possibly H31 was included in Scott's collection as early as 1740, as this date appears...

From the river to the desert

From the river to the desert. Sylvia Dunstan* (1955-1993). For the liberal Protestant church the adoption of the Revised Common Lectionary has meant a recovery of the church year and a need for hymns to mark particular events in the life of Christ. 'The Temptation', as Sylvia Dunstan called this hymn, was written for the first Sunday of Lent, 1989: 'I prepared this hymn on the temptation story. It is essentially a conversation between Jesus and Satan, bracketed by narration in the first stanza...

Jimmy Owens

OWENS, Jimmy Lloyd. b. Clarksdale, Mississippi, 9 December 1930. After school at Jackson, Mississippi, he attended Millsaps College, and was a jazz band arranger; after a conversion he directed music in several churches in southern California. He married Carol Owens* in 1954. Beginning in the 'Jesus Movement', the Owens were active in writing contemporary Christian musicals, performing and recording in various places in California, and doing musical missions for the Church of the Way in Los...

Robert M. Cull

CULL, Robert Marcus. b. Los Angeles, California, 24 May 1949. In 1971 Cull graduated from Southern California College (in 1999 renamed Vanguard University of Southern California), Costa Mesa, founded by The Assemblies of God. He attended campus concerts featuring song writers and performers in the emerging Jesus Movement, such as Andraé Crouch* and Pat Boone; and attended the nearby Calvary Chapel which also featured this style of worship song. There he joined a singing group, The Accents,...

William Owen

OWEN, William. b. Prysgol, Caernarvonshire (now Gwynedd), 12 December 1813; d. 20 July 1893. He was a musician who lived at Caerthraw (Gwyrfai district). He wrote anthems and hymn tunes, which he published in Y Perl Cerddorol (1886). His tune PRYSGOL was used in EH for two hymns printed consecutively, 'I lay my sins on Jesus' by Horatius Bonar*, and 'I need Thee, precious Jesus'*, by Frederick Whitfield* (1827-1904). He is best known, however, as the composer of the grand BRYN CALFARIA, set to...

Mission Praise

  Mission Praise (Mission England Praise, 1983; Mission Praise 2, 1987; Mission Praise Supplement, 1989; Mission Praise Combined, 1990; New Mission Praise, 1996; Complete Mission Praise, 1999; new edition, 2005; online edition, 2008; 25th anniversary edition, 2009; 30th anniversary edition, 2015). In terms of sales, Mission Praise was a phenomenally successful publication in the last fifteen years of the 20th century and the first decades of the 21st. Across all its editions, including Junior...

The Galilean fishers toil

The Galilean fishers toil. Christopher Wordsworth* (1807-1885). First published in The Holy Year (1862), where it was assigned to the fourth Sunday in Advent. It relates to the Collect for that day which asks God to 'succour us; that whereas, through our sins and wickedness, we are sore let and hindered in running the race that is set before us, thy bountiful grace and mercy may speedily help and deliver us'. It recalls the miraculous draught of fishes, the calming of the storm, Peter's denial...

George Bett Blanchard

BLANCHARD, George Bett. b. Ulceby, near Immingham, Lincolnshire, 1856, date unknown; d. Hull, 17 November 1927. Blanchard lived for most of his life in Hull, where he was an active member of Waltham Street Wesleyan Methodist Church, serving as Sunday-School Superintendent, Choirmaster, and Organist. In 1892 he began to supply his own hymns for Sunday-School Anniversaries, two of which were printed in Sunday School Praise (1958): 'Listen to the voice of Jesus'*, and the most unusual 'With a...

James Thomas East

EAST, James Thomas. b. Kettering, Northamptonshire, 28 Jan 1860; d. Blackburn, Lancashire, 28 May 1937. He entered the Wesleyan Methodist ministry in 1886. He served in circuits at Glasgow, Daventry, Peterborough, Redruth, Frome, Driffield, Cradley (Staffordshire), Neath, Clayton-le Moors (Lancashire), Rochdale, and Blackburn. East is known for the popular children's hymn, 'Wise men, seeking Jesus'*, which appeared in the Wesleyan Methodist School Hymnal (1911), and in many subsequent...

John Bakewell

BAKEWELL, John. b. Brailsford, Derbyshire, 1721, date unknown; d. Lewisham, London, 18 March 1819. He became an evangelist and moved to London where he associated with the early Methodists, beginning to preach for them in 1744. He also had connections with other evangelicals such as Martin Madan* and Augustus Montague Toplady*. He continued to preach for the Wesleyans and was interred in their burial ground at City Road Chapel. He was possibly the author of 'Hail, thou once despised Jesus'*,...

William Medlen Hutchings

HUTCHINGS, William Medlen. b. Devonport, 28 August 1827; d. Camberwell, London, 21 May 1876. Little is known about him: he is said to have been a printer and publisher, working in London and perhaps in Wigan, Lancashire. He is believed to have been a member of the Congregational church. Hutchings is thought to have lived and worked at Wigan at some time, because the hymn by which he is remembered, 'When mothers of Salem, their children brought to Jesus', was written for a Sunday-school...

Organs in British hymnody

Attitudes towards the use of organs to accompany the congregational singing of hymns and metrical psalms varied dramatically across the centuries and from place to place. Religious zealots denounced them as vainglorious ornaments, whilst musical reformers advocated their use to impose order on undisciplined singing. This makes an account of the subject problematic since almost any statement can be contradicted. It is important to realise that whereas organs were habitually to be found in the...

Latvian Lutheran hymnody

History The territory of present-day Latvia, a country of approximately 25,400 square miles, situated on the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea, has been inhabited since 9,000 BCE and by Baltic tribes since 2,000 BCE. These tribes settled various regions that have come to be known by their tribal names – Kurzeme (Courland), Zemgale (Semigallia), Latgale (Letgallia) and Vidzeme (Livland). These regions differed linguistically, with all but the Livs, who were Finno-Ugric speakers like their...

Alleluia, song of sweetness

Alleluia, song of sweetness. Latin, 11th century or earlier, translated by John Mason Neale* (1818-1866). This is Neale's translation of 'Alleluya, dulce carmen'*, the hymn used in various rites to mark the pre-season of Lent, normally sung before Septuagesima Sunday, the ninth Sunday before Easter, the third Sunday before Ash Wednesday. It was printed in Neale's Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences (1851), with a preface: The Latin Church, as is well known, forbade, as a general rule, the use of...

Columbanus

COLUMBANUS, St. b. Ireland, 543; d. Bobbio, Italy, 615. Born in the western part of the province of Leinster, St Columbanus became a monk at the Abbey of Bangor, Co. Down (now in Northern Ireland), during the abbacy of its founder, St Comgall (ca. 516-601). He went into exile, ca. 590, together with twelve companions. They called themselves Peregrini pro Christo and were responsible for the foundation of numerous monasteries in France, Germany, Switzerland and Italy during the 7th and 8th...

Courage, brother! do not stumble

Courage, brother! do not stumble. Norman Macleod* (1812-1872). Written for a Christian rally of working men, this was first published in 1857 in The Edinburgh Christian Instructor (Macleod was at one time its editor). With its strong ethical message ('Trust in God, and do the right') it was a very popular hymn in the 19th century, and in the first part of the 20th. It had four 8-line stanzas in the Church Hymnary (1898), set to a tune, COURAGE, BROTHER, by Arthur Sullivan*: Courage, brother!...

Maria Luise Thurmair

THURMAIR, Maria Luise (née Mumelter). b. Bozen, Süd Tirol, Austria (now Bolzano, Alto Adige, Italy), 27 September 1912; d. Germering, München, 24 October 2005. Her father was District 'Hauptmann', or District Superintendent, the last under Austrian rule. When Süd Tirol was ceded to Italy at the end of World War I, the family moved to Innsbruck, where the child Maria Luise went to school at the Ursuline Gymnasium. At the University she studied philosophy, German, history and liturgy, with a...

O North, with all thy vales of green

O North, with all thy vales of green. William Cullen Bryant* (1794-1878).   This was Hymn XIX in Bryant's Hymns (1864). It was headed 'Thou hast put all things under his feet' (from Psalm 8: 6, quoted in 1 Corinthians 15: 27 and Ephesians 1; 22). It had four stanzas:  Oh, North, with all thy vales of green! Oh, South, with all thy palms!From peopled towns and fields between Uplift the voice of psalms.Raise, ancient East! the anthem high,And let the youthful West reply.  Lo! in the clouds...

Peter Abelard

ABELARD, Peter. b. le Pallet, near Nantes, Brittany, 1079; d. Châlons-sur-Saone, 21 April 1142. He was the son of Berengar, Lord of Pallet. His distinguished family background marked him out as a potential soldier, but he became a brilliant student of philosophy and theology, both at Paris and Laon. At 22 he was made a canon and teacher at the school attached to Notre Dame in Paris, where his lectures are said to have enthralled his students but alarmed his colleagues. However, one of them,...

Take my life, and let it be

Take my life, and let it be. Frances Ridley Havergal* (1836-1879). Written on 4 February 1874, not long after Havergal's experience of 'the blessedness of true consecration' on Advent Sunday 1873. She described the composition herself, in an account of a visit to Areley House (near Stourport, Worcestershire): I went for a little visit of five days. There were ten persons in the house, some unconverted and long prayed for, some converted but not rejoicing Christians. He gave me the prayer,...

English carols

The carol is in origin a secular round dance with singing, and the English carol is closely connected to the French carole, which flourished from the mid-12th to the mid-14th century. The stanzas, during which, as the word (from Italian stanze) indicates, all stood still, were sung by a solo voice, and all joined in the 'burden' during which the circle dance took place (on the connections between the carol and the goliard, see Goliards*). The most accessible resources for those interested in...

German hymns in English translation

Matthäus Apelles von Löwenstern The Reformation and its Impact (1517-1618) Of the pre-Reformation writers, the one whose work is still used is John Tauler*, one of whose hymns was paraphrased with a first line 'As the bridegroom to his chosen'*. This version by Emma Frances Bevan* was published in her Hymns of Tersteegen, Suso and Others (1894). It was printed in School Worship (1926), but was little known until it was selected for 100HfT (1969) with a new tune (BRIDEGROOM, by Peter Cutts*)....

Wyatt Tee Walker

WALKER, Wyatt Tee. b. Brockton, Massachusetts, 16 August 1929; d. Chester, Virginia USA, January 23, 2018. Prominent theologian, author, musician, and social activist, Walker holds the Bachelor of Science in chemistry and physics (1950), the Master of Divinity from Virginia Union University, Richmond, Virginia (1953), and a doctorate in African American studies from Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, Rochester, New York (1975). From 1953-60, Walker was pastor of Gillfield Baptist Church,...

United Church of Canada hymnals

The Methodist Church Canada, the Congregational Union of Canada and 70% of the Presbyterian Church in Canada united to form The United Church of Canada on 10 June 1925. The first hymnbook of the new church, The Hymnary, was published in Toronto in 1930 by The United Church Publishing House. In 1971 the United Church of Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada issued a joint hymnal entitled The Hymn Book. It was the only product of a thirty-year dialogue towards church union. Voices United: the...

Let all the world in every corner sing

Let all the world in every corner sing. George Herbert* (1593-1633). From Herbert's posthumous collection The Temple (Cambridge, 1633) where it is entitled 'Antiphon (I)', this was the first of Herbert's poems to be used as a hymn without significant adaptation when it was published in Church Hymns (1871). An antiphon is 'a composition, in verse or prose, consisting of verses or passages sung alternately by two choirs in worship' (Oxford English Dictionary). In the original poem, this is made...

Lord, the light of your love is shining

Lord, the light of your love is shining. Graham Kendrick* (1950- ). Written in 1987, this song is universally known by the opening of its chorus, 'Shine, Jesus, shine', which is also (as often in Kendrick's work) the name of the tune, SHINE, JESUS, SHINE. Kendrick himself has described it as 'a prayer for revival', adding: I had been thinking for some time about the holiness of God, and how that as a community of believers and as individuals, His desire is for us to live continually in His...

Morning breaks upon the tomb

Morning breaks upon the tomb. William Bengo Collyer* (1782-1854). First published in Collyer's Hymns partly collected and partly original (1812), with the title 'Jesus Rising . An Easter Hymn', and signed 'W.B.C.' Morning breaks upon the tomb, Jesus dissipates its gloom! Day of triumph through the skies - See the glorious Saviour rise! Christians dry your flowing tears, Chase those unbelieving fears; Look on his deserted grave, Doubt no more his power to save. Ye who are of death afraid,...

Patrick Appleford

APPLEFORD, Patrick Robert Norman. b. Croydon, Surrey, 4 May 1925; d. 9 December 2018. Educated at Hurstpierpoint College, Sussex, Trinity College, Cambridge, and Chichester Theological College (deacon 1952, priest 1953). He was curate at All Saints' with St Frideswide, Poplar, East London (1952-58); chaplain and lecturer, Bishop's College, Cheshunt, Hertfordshire (1958-61); and Education Secretary for the United Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1961-66). He was Dean of Holy Cross...

The prize is set before us

The prize is set before us. Christopher Rubey Blackall* (1830-1924). According to JJ, p. 144, this was written for the Sunday school of the Second Baptist Church, Chicago, Illinois, in 1874, and set to music by Horatio Richmond Palmer* (1834-1907). It was published in Palmer's Songs of Love for the Bible School (1871), and later in Ira D. Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos (1881 edition), where it remains, with Palmer's tune, to this day. It was also included in Palmer's Book of Gems for the...

William John Sparrow-Simpson

SPARROW-SIMPSON, William John. b. London, 20 June 1859; d. Ilford, Essex, 13 February 1952. He was educated at St Paul's School, London, and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1882, MA 1886, BD 1909, DD 1911). His initial ministry was in London, where he was curate of Christ Church, Albany Street (1882-88), then vicar of St Mark's Church, Regent's Park (1888-1904). In 1904 he moved to Essex, where he became chaplain of St Mary's Hospital, Ilford, an ancient charitable foundation; from 1919 he was...

Will L. Thompson

THOMPSON, Will Lamartine. b. Smith's Ferry, Pennsylvania, 7 November 1847; d. New York City, 20 September 1909. Thompson was the son of a prominent merchant banker and state legislator. He attended Mount Union College, Ohio, the Boston School of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music, Boston. He then studied at the Leipzig Conservatory of Music, Leipzig, Germany. In 1875 he settled in East Liverpool, Ohio, and founded the Will L. Thompson Co., a music publisher and retail sales...

What a wonderful change in my life has been wrought

What a wonderful change in my life has been wrought ('Since Jesus came into my heart'). Rufus Henry McDaniel* (1850–1940).  This hymn is often known as 'Since Jesus came into my heart'. McDaniel wrote it in 1914, after the tragic loss of his youngest son Herschel in 1913 as a way to honor him (Cottrill, 2010). It first appeared in The Message in Song, Nos. 1 and 2 (Philadelphia, 1914) compiled by Arthur S. Magann, Charles F. Allen, and John F. Hills, with a musical setting by Charles...

Preaching and hymns

  Preaching and hymns From the earliest years of the Christian movement, the followers of Jesus have included in their worship the celebration of the Eucharist, prayers of praise and intercession as well as the singing of hymns and some form of preaching (e.g., 1 Corinthians 14: 1-19; Ephesians 5: 18-20; Colossians 3: 16-17). These activities, or better 'practices,' have thus been central to Christian liturgies in almost all traditions since groups of disciples began to form what we now call...

Armenian hymnody

The documented music in Armenian culture is the sacred music associated with the liturgical services of the Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Church. The tradition developed soon after the invention of the Armenian alphabet (405-406). Fragmentary manuscripts of the Sharaknots (Hymnal) with neumatic (khaz) notation date back to the 8th century. In common with other Christian cultures of the east, Armenian music was exclusively monodic. During the first centuries of Christianity, the musical repertoire...

O let the heart beat high with bliss

O let the heart beat high with bliss. Latin, 15th century, translated by Percy Dearmer*.  The Latin text, 'Exultet cor praecordiis', was found in a Sarum Breviary of 1495, and is in two 16th-century Breviaries, Hereford (1505) and Aberdeen (1510) (Frost, 1962, p. 520). A translation in five stanzas was made for the First Edition of A&M (1861), beginning 'Let every heart exulting beat', and placed in the 'General Hymns'. It was not included in the Second Edition (1875), nor in any...

Australian hymnody

1788-1859 The European phase of Australian history commenced with the establishment in 1788 of a penal settlement to which prisoners or convicts were transported from England, Ireland and Scotland to serve out their sentences. Little evidence concerning the singing of hymns in this settlement or elsewhere in the earliest years has survived, although it is clear that hymns were greatly treasured by individuals and groups. An early chronicler recorded that the first service in Melbourne was...

Methodist Episcopal hymns, music, USA

Methodist Episcopal hymns, music, USA  A copy of A Collection of Psalms and Hymns (49 psalms and 38 hymns, some of each with multiple 'parts') was sent by John Wesley* to the Methodist Episcopal Church's organizing conference (Baltimore, 1784). This first 'authorized' hymnal did not include music, cite tune names or reference tune collections. The Minutes of several conversations between the Rev. Thomas Coke, LL.D., the Rev. Francis Asbury  .  .  . (Philadelphia, 1785) included instructions on...

Come, every soul by sin oppressed

Come, every soul by sin oppressed. John H. Stockton* (1813-1877). The words and music first appeared under the title 'Come to Jesus' in Notes of Joy for the Sabbath School, edited by 'Mrs. Joseph F. Knapp' (Phoebe Palmer Knapp*) (New York, 1869), and it was used by Ira D. Sankey* in the Moody* and Sankey evangelistic campaign in Britain in 1873. It was published in Stockton's Salvation Melodies No. 1 (Philadelphia, 1874) and in Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos (1875 edition). It appeared in The...

Eliza E. Hewitt

HEWITT, Eliza Edmunds. b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 28 June 1851; d. Philadelphia, 24 April 1920. Eliza Hewitt spent her entire life in the city of her birth. She taught school there, after being educated at the Girls' Normal School, until she was incapacitated by a spinal injury for some time. Initially active in Olivet Presbyterian Church, Hewitt worked at the Northern Home for Friendless Children, and later as a Sunday-school superintendent at Calvin Presbyterian Church. Publishing various...

Francis Stanfield

STANFIELD, Francis. b. probably at Camden, London, 5 November 1835; d. Clapton, east London, 12 May 1914. His family lived at Camden from 1832 to 1839. He was the son of Clarkson Stanfield (1793-1867), the theatrical and landscape painter, and friend of Charles Dickens. Clarkson Stanfield became an increasingly devout Roman Catholic in his later years. Two of his children, Francis and Raymund, became Catholic priests. Francis, a convert to Catholicism like his father, was ordained in 1860 and...

What can wash away my sin

What can wash away my sin. Robert Lowry* (1826-1899). First published in Gospel Music (New York, 1876), compiled by Lowry and William Howard Doane*, with the first line as 'What can wash away my stain?' . It is based on Hebrews 9: 22. It is normally given the title 'Nothing but the Blood', referring to the repeated lines 2 and 4 of each stanza. It had six stanzas. Some books, such as Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, editions of the Baptist Hymnal and UMH, and the British Song Book of the...

Aeterna Christi munera

Aeterna Christi munera. Perhaps by Ambrose of Milan* (339/40-397). This hymn exists in two principal forms, but with many variants: 1. 'Aeterna Christi munera/ Et martyrum victorias'. This hymn was attributed to Ambrose by Bede* in his De arte metrica, and this attribution was accepted by 19th- and early 20th-century editors: Analecta Hymnologica attributes it to Ambrose (50.19), and so does A.S. Walpole (1922, p. 104). The attribution had already been called into question (see JJ, p. 24),...

Arnold Brooks

BROOKS, Arnold. b. Edgbaston, Birmingham, 25 December 1870; d. Edinburgh, 2 July 1933. Brooks was educated at King Edward's School, Birmingham, and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge (BA 1893, MA 1897). After serving a curacy at Bermondsey, London (1897-99), he moved to Scotland and to the Scottish Episcopal Church, becoming a 'licensed curate' of St Peter's, Lutton Place, Edinburgh (1899-1905), and then of St John's, Princes Street, Edinburgh (1905- 09). He was priest-in-charge of St...

As the sun doth daily rise

As the sun doth daily rise. Horatio Bolton Nelson* (1823-1913). The origins of this hymn are shrouded in mystery. It was a Latin text, beginning 'Matutinus altiora', translated by a 'J. Masters'. Nothing seems to be known of the Latin text or of its translator. JJ, p. 1579, followed by all commentators, gave the first line of Masters' translation as 'As the sun to brighter skies', and notes that the hymn was described as 'King Alfred's Hymn. Words by O.B.C. Music by Dr Smith'. The entry...

Charles William Humphreys

HUMPHREYS, Charles William. b. Oswestry, Shropshire, 1840 (Baptised, 14 September); d. Hastings, Sussex, 1 January 1921. He was educated at King Edward VI School, Birmingham, and became an insurance manager. In Songs of Praise Discussed (p. 160), Percy Dearmer mentions that Humphreys was living in South America at the time of the compilation of EH. Humphreys wrote the first version, in Common Metre, of 'Strengthen for service, Lord, the hands'*. He also wrote 'From glory to glory advancing, we...

Fulbert of Chartres

FULBERT of Chartres. b. ca. 960; d. 10 April 1028. Born possibly in Italy, he studied in Rome and later in Rheims. Between 984 and 987 he was at the court of the Frankish king. He moved to Chartres ca. 992, where he held a teaching office and that of singing-master. He was consecrated bishop of Chartres in 1006. He did much to enhance the spiritual and temporal power of the French bishops, and he began the rebuilding of the cathedral after the fire of 1020. The hymns ascribed to him are found...

God, my Father, loving me

God, my Father, loving me. George Wallace Briggs* (1875-1959). First published in Songs of Praise for Boys and Girls (1929), in five verses. It then appeared in the 'For Children' section of SofPE (1931), revised and with the last stanza omitted: Then, when I am called to share Yonder home thou dost prepare, I shall meet my King, and praise Him through everlasting days. Apart from this verse, it is a good example of a hymn for children, containing profound truths in simple language. The...

God of light and life's creation

God of light and life's creation. Michael Arnold Perry* (1942-1996). Unusually, this hymn is based on King Solomon's prayer of dedication in the Jerusalem temple (1 Kings 8, 2 Chronicles 6), seen from a contemporary Christian perspective. It was written at Bitterne, Southampton, in 1976. The occasion was 'Consecration Sunday', close to the church's anniversary, which was used as a time of re-dedication by all the church's leaders. An additional stanza, subsequently dropped, referred to the...

God who gives to life its goodness

God who gives to life its goodness. Walter Farquharson* (1936-). A summer holiday inspired this two-verse hymn of celebration, written while the Farquharson family camped at Kenosee Lake in Moose Mountain Provincial Park in Saskatchewan. It was sung at the ecumenical service of dedication for The Hymn Book (1971) organized by the United Church and the Anglican Church of Canada. Within a decade congregations in both churches across Canada knew it so well many had forgotten it was a 'new'...

Heinrich Siegmund Oswald

OSWALD, Heinrich Siegmund. b. near Liegnitz, Silesia (now Legnica, Poland), 30 June 1751; d. Breslau (Wroclaw), 8 September 1834. He was educated locally before becoming Private Secretary to the Landrath von Prittwitz in 1773. He then worked in Hamburg and Breslau before being appointed to the staff of Friedrich Wilhelm II of Prussia. After the king's death in 1797 he retired, first to Hirschberg and then to Breslau. He is known as the author of 'Wem in Leidenstagen', a hymn of 14 stanzas,...

John Hunter

HUNTER, John. b. Aberdeen, 14 July 1848; d. Hampstead, London, 15 September 1917. He was apprenticed to a draper, but decided to train for the Congregational ministry. He was accepted at Paton Congregational College, Nottingham, which specialised in training young men with unusual qualifications. Dr Paton sent on his best students to Spring Hill College, Birmingham (later Mansfield College, Oxford), and Hunter was duly sent there. He served as a very successful Congregational minister at...

Kenyan hymnody

Before the Second Vatican Council, Western hymns in translation and settings of the ordinary of the mass were the primary sources of congregational music among the mainline colonial churches in Eastern Africa, including in Kenya. For Protestants, the spread of Pentecostal songs provided an impetus for change. Oral-tradition adaptations of Western hymns also flourished in African Independent (Initiated) Churches. Nathan J. Corbitt, a missionary ethnomusicologist in Kenya during the early 1980s,...

Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren

Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren. Joachim Neander* (1650-1680). First published in A und Ω. Joachimi Neandri Glaub- und Liebesübung: auffgemuntert durch einfältige Bundes Lieder und Danck-Psalmen (Bremen, 1680). It is found in EG in all five verses in the 'Loben und Danken' section (EG 317). It is Neander's finest hymn, and one of the best known of all German hymns, a magnificent tribute to God as Creator and Preserver. It was written to a tune (in many English-speaking books...

O Lord of hosts, how lovely is your dwelling-place

O Lord of hosts, how lovely is your dwelling place. David George Preston* (1939-). This text was written ca. 1980 at Leicester, where the author then lived and worked with the Inter-Varsity Press. With it, a contemporary paraphrase of a much-acclaimed and popular psalm (84) was wedded to a similarly celebrated and traditional tune, the LONDONDERRY AIR. The words were published in The Book of Praises (1986), and have been reprinted in local collections such as Praises for the King of Kings...

Peter George Jarvis

JARVIS, Peter George. b. London, 2 August 1925. He was educated at the King's School, Macclesfield, Cheshire (1934-42), followed by a period working for the Inland Revenue (1942-49). After a year as a pre-collegiate probationer, he studied for the Methodist ministry at Handsworth College (1950-54). He was ordained in 1954, and served in Methodist circuits at Dudley (1954-57), Leighton Buzzard (1957-61), Harrow (1961-67), Reading (1967-72), Tooting Mission (1972-78), Wantage and Abingdon...

Richard Hayes Robinson

ROBINSON, Richard Hayes. b. 1842; d. Bournemouth, Hampshire, 5 November 1892. Educated at King's College, London, he took Holy Orders (deacon 1866, priest 1868). He was curate of St Paul's, Upper Norwood, Surrey, 1869, curate of Weston, Bath, 1872, curate of St Michael's, Bath, 1881, and perpetual curate of St Germans, Blackheath, 1884. During his time at Weston he was Organising Secretary for the National Society (Southern District). He published Thought and Deed: Sermons on Faith and Duty...

When all thy mercies, O my God

When all thy mercies, O my God. Joseph Addison* (1672-1719). From The Spectator, no 453, Saturday, 9 August 1712. It had thirteen stanzas, taking the narrative from the development of the foetus ('When in the silent womb I lay') to babyhood ('hung upon the breast') through the 'infant heart' and 'the slippery paths of youth' to adulthood, when the singer/speaker has been saved from danger, vice, and sickness. Most hymnbooks print a selection of stanzas, ending with gratitude in this world...

William Henry Gill

GILL, William Henry. b. Marsala, Sicily, 24 October 1839; d. Worthing, Sussex, 27 June 1923. The son of a Manx family, he was educated at King William's College, Castletown, Isle of Man. He worked as a civil servant in London for forty years, and in that time transcribed and published Manx National Songs (1896) and A Manx Wedding and Other Songs (Abingdon, 1900). He wrote a number of hymns, including 'Father of all, thy never-dying love'. The best known is 'The Manx Fishermen's Evening Hymn',...

Aeterne Rex altissime

Aeterne Rex altissime. Latin, 9th century or earlier. This anonymous hymn was cited by Gottschalk of Orbais* in the 9th century, and entered the liturgical tradition as an Ascension hymn in the 9th-century New Hymnal (see 'Medieval hymns and hymnals*). It continued in use throughout the middle ages, in (for example) the Dominican* and Cistercian* hymnals as well as in Benedictine liturgical practices. It was included in the 1632 printed Roman Breviary; this text was edited in the 19th century,...

Arthur Christopher Benson

BENSON, Arthur Christopher. b. Crowthorne, Berkshire, 24 April 1862; d. Cambridge, 17 June 1925. He was the son of Edward White Benson*, who was Headmaster of Wellington College, Crowthorne, at the time of his birth, and subsequently Archbishop of Canterbury. The younger Benson was educated at Eton, and King's College, Cambridge (BA 1884). He taught at Eton, 1885-1903, resigning to become a full-time writer. He went to live at Cambridge, where he was elected to a Fellowship at Magdalene College...

Cantico di frate sole

Cantico di frate sole. St Francis (ca. 1181/2-1226). This hymn, 'Canticle of brother son, praise of all creation', ('laude della creatur') is believed to be the earliest Italian Laude spirituale. It may have been written over a period of time, and finished (with the reference to death) in 1225, at a time when St Francis was suffering greatly in mind and body. It has affinities with Psalm 148, but adds its own uniquely affectionate wording, praising the elements of the creation in terms of...

Colored Sacred Harp, The

The Colored Sacred Harp (Ozark, Alabama, 1934; Montgomery, Alabama, 2004) is a collection of 77 shape-note pieces. It was the result of the work of Judge Jackson (1883-1958) and members of a committee appointed by the Dale County Colored Musical Institute and the Alabama and Florida Union State Convention. Sacred Harp singing had started with the publication of B. F. White* and Elisha J. King*'s The Sacred Harp (Philadelphia, 1844).  Since the 1870s, African Americans had held singing...

Christian Burke

Christian Carolina Anna Burke. b. London, 18 September 1859: d. Saffron Walden, Essex, 4 March 1944. There is not much information available about Christian Burke. It is Frost who gives her second name as 'Carolina', and her place of death as Saffron Walden (1962, p. 540). According to James Mearns*, she was living in Highgate, London, in 1906 (JJ, p. 1617). She must have been well known as a writer on religious topics. During the 1880s and 1890s she published several books or tracts: Jim: a...

For my sake and the Gospel's, go

For my sake and the Gospel's, go. Edward Henry Bickersteth* (1825-1906) Bickersteth was a strong supporter of Christian missions. This hymn was first published in The Church Missionary Hymnbook (1899). It was written for, and perhaps inspired by, the splendid tune by Arthur Sullivan*, BISHOPGARTH. Sullivan's tune had been written two years earlier to words written for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria by William Walsham How*, 'O King of kings, Whose reign of old'*. Sullivan hoped that the...

God bless our native land

God bless our native land. William Edward Hickson* (1803-1870). Written in 1836 and published in The Singing Master, Hickson's famous book on musical education, where it had three stanzas. A fourth stanza was added to the Second Edition of The Singing Master in 1844. Hickson said that it had been written 'as a new national anthem' (JJ, p. 1566): it follows the metre of 'God save our gracious Queen (King)', and can be sung to the normal tune, although it is often set to MOSCOW by Felice...

Henry Burton

BURTON, Henry. b. Swannington, Leicestershire, 26 November 1840; d. West Kirby, Hoylake, Cheshire, 27 April 1930. As a young man Burton went with his family when they emigrated to the USA in 1856. They settled in Wisconsin, and Henry studied at Beloit College, then fairly new (founded 1846). He became a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was in charge of a church at Monroe, Wisconsin, for a short time. He then returned to Britain: he was ordained into the Wesleyan Methodist...

Johann Gramann

GRAMANN, Johann. b. Neustadt-an-der-Aisch (north-west of Nürnberg), 5 July 1487; d. Königsberg, 29 April 1541. He was educated at Leipzig, where he became rector of the Thomasschule. During the famous disputation at Leipzig in 1519 between Luther* and the Dominican Johannes Eck, Gramann was so impressed by Luther that he went to study at Wittenberg. He became a Lutheran pastor, succeeding Paul Speratus* as cathedral preacher at Würzburg in 1522. In 1525, at the suggestion of Duke Albrecht of...

John Darwall

DARWALL, John. b. Haughton, near Stafford, 27 December 1731 (baptised 13 January 1732); d. Walsall, Staffordshire, 18 December 1789. The son of the rector of Haughton, Randle Darwall, he was educated at Manchester Grammar School and Brasenose College, Oxford. He took Holy Orders (deacon 1756, priest 1757), becoming curate of Haughton, and then Bushbury, 1757, followed by Trysull, 1758. He moved to St Matthew's, Walsall, in 1761, becoming vicar in 1769, and remaining there until his death. He...

John Wilkes

WILKES, John. dates unknown, perhaps 1823-1882. John Wilkes is given as the arranger of MONKLAND, the tune named after the village in Herefordshire of which Sir Henry Williams Baker* was squire and vicar. It was set in the First Edition of A&M (1861) and in subsequent editions to Baker's 'Praise, O praise our God and King'*. The tune had been composed by John Antes*, and had appeared in a Moravian book, The Hymn Tunes of the Church of the Brethren (1824), compiled by John Lees (1773-1839)...

Joseph Anstice

ANSTICE, Joseph. b. Madeley, Shropshire, 21 Dec 1808; d. Torquat, Devon, 29 Feb 1836. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford (B.A. 1831, M.A. 1835), where he won prizes for English Verse and for an English Essay. He was a friend of William Ewart Gladstone*, who said of him 'would I were worthy to be his companion.' In 1831 he was appointed Professor of Classics at the newly founded King's College, London. He resigned through ill-health in 1835, and died of consumption a...

My country, 'tis of thee

My country, 'tis of thee. Samuel F. Smith* (1808-1895). Written in 1831, this hymn was first sung on 4 July 1831 at an Independence Day celebration of the Boston Sabbath School Union at Park Street Congregational Church, Boston, Massachusetts. It had five stanzas. The original stanza 3, with its reference to British tyranny, was omitted from subsequent printings: No more shall tyrants here With haughty steps appear, And soldier bands; No more shall tyrants tread Above the patriot dead...

Thomas Pestel

PESTEL (Pestell), Thomas. b. Leicester, 1586 (baptized 9 October); d. Leicester, 1667 (buried 2 July). He was the son of a tailor who must have been prosperous and well connected, because Pestel's career was determined by patronage. He was an undergraduate at Queens' College, Cambridge; after ordination he was presented to the living of Coleorton, Leicestershire by Sir Thomas Beaumont (1611). He became vicar of the next village, Packington, in 1622, holding both appointments until he...

Abner Jones

JONES, Abner. fl. 1830-1860. Around 1815 Jones seems to have lived in Carroll, a town in Chautauqua County, New York. In the 1830s he lived in New York City, near Murray Street Presbyterian Church which supported the founding of Union Seminary, and whose pastor, William D. Snodgrass (1796-1886), may have done some editing with him. Thomas McAuley (1778-1862) succeeded Snodgrass as pastor and became the first President of Union Seminary. Jones also knew Gardiner Spring who was a member of Brick...

Awake, my soul! lift up thine eyes

Awake, my soul! lift up thine eyes. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1743-1825). First published in her friend William Enfield*'s Hymns for Public Worship: selected from various authors, and intended as a supplement to Dr Watts's Psalms (Warrington, 1772), entitled 'The Conflict'. It had six stanzas: Awake, my soul, lift up thine eyes;See where thy foes against thee rise,In long array, a numerous host;Awake my soul, or thou art lost. Here giant danger threat'ning standsMustering his pale terrific...

Behold, where breathing love divine

Behold, where breathing love divine. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1743-1825).  According to JJ, p. 132, this hymn was first found in her friend William Enfield*'s Hymns for Public Worship: selected from various authors, and intended as a supplement to Dr Watts's Psalms (Warrington, 1772), and in Barbauld's (then Lucy Aikin's) Poems (1773). This is the hymn from which stanzas were taken to form the much better known 'Blest is the man whose softening heart*. The full text of eight stanzas will be...

Could we with ink the ocean fill

Could we with ink the ocean fill. Author unknown. This was printed in The Lord's Songs: a Collection of Composures in Metre, such as have been most used in the late glorious revivals; Dr Watts's  Psalms and Hymns excepted (Salem, Massachusetts: Joshua Cushing, 1805), compiled and edited by Joshua Spalding* AM, 'Minister at the Branch Church at Salem', with the title 'The Love of God to Man'.  The Collection is available at https://archive.org/stream/lordssongscolle00spal#page/n5/mode/2up The...

J. Edwin Orr

ORR, James Edwin. b. Belfast, Northern Ireland, 12 January 1912; d. Asheville, North Carolina, 22 April 1987. As a young man he became a travelling evangelist, beginning in 1933, visiting many countries. It was during one of these visits, to an Easter Conference at Ngaruwahia, New Zealand in 1936, that he wrote the hymn by which he has become known, 'Search me, O God, and know my heart today'*. He later became assistant pastor of the People's Church, Toronto, Canada; he was ordained to the...

Thy ceaseless, unexhausted love

Thy ceaseless, unexhausted love. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Short Hymns on Select Passages of the Holy Scriptures (1762), as three separate hymns, each of one 8-line stanza and each based on Exodus 34: 6. It was included in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), as one hymn of six 4-line verses, and with 'ceaseless' substituted for 'causeless' in the first line. It has appeared in all subsequent Methodist hymnbooks and in...

Vital spark of heav'nly flame

Vital spark of heav'nly flame. Alexander Pope (1688-1744). According to Aelius Spartianus in his Life of the Emperor Hadrian (76-138, Emperor 117-138), Hadrian composed some verses on his death-bed beginning 'Animula vagula, blandula' ('wandering pleasant little soul'). They were translated by Pope, with the title 'Adriani morientis ad Animam, or The Heathen to his Departing Soul'. This shows the dying Hadrian musing on the uncertain future of his soul: 'Whither, oh whither art thou flying!/...

William Bengo Collyer

COLLYER, William Bengo. b. Deptford, Kent, 14 April 1782; d. Peckham, south London, 9 January 1854. He was educated for the Independent ministry at Homerton College. He became the minister of a small chapel at Peckham, south London in 1800, and was ordained to that chapel in 1801. He remained there for more than fifty years, preaching his last sermon one month before his death. He greatly increased the congregation by his eloquent preaching, and the chapel was enlarged and rebuilt in 1816....

Anthony Gregory Murray

MURRAY, Anthony Gregory (monastic name) OSB. b. Fulham, London, 27 February 1905; d. 19 January 1992. He was educated at Westminster Cathedral Choir School (1914-20) and St Benedict's Priory School, Ealing (1920-22). He entered Downside Abbey as a monk in 1922, and read History at Cambridge University (1926-29). He was organist and choirmaster at Downside from 1929 to 1941. He was parish priest at Ealing, (1941-46), Hindley, near Wigan, (1948-52), and Stratton on the Fosse (Downside)...

Come, Christians, join to sing

Come, Christians, join to sing. Christian Henry Bateman* (1813–1889).  This hymn was published in Bateman's Sacred Melodies for Children (Edinburgh, 1843) in five stanzas with the first line as 'Come, children, join to sing'. The number of stanzas was reduced to three in Melodies for Sabbath Schools and Families (1854). The inspiration for the hymn came directly from an earlier text by the British educational writer William Edward Hickson*, 'Join now in praise, and sing', published in an...

Annue Christi saeculorum Domine

Annue Christi saeculorum Domine. Latin, before 11th century. This hymn, 'Grant us, O Christ, lord of the ages', was used at Vespers on the Feasts of individual Apostles, and was included in the late-tenth century Anglo-Saxon hymnals associated with the Benedictine reforms at Canterbury* and Winchester*. It was quite widely used in the middle ages, including by the Carmelites* in their distinctive feast in honour of the patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The hymn has four stanzas succeeded...

Ich bin ein Gast auf Erden

Ich bin ein Gast auf Erden. Paul Gerhardt* (1607-1676). First published in Johann Georg Ebeling*'s Pauli Gerhardti Geistliche Andachten Bestehend in hundert und zwantzig Liedern (Berlin, 1666-67). It was headed 'Auß dem 119. Psalm Davids'. It had fourteen 8-line stanzas. EG 529 shortens it by omitting verses 4b, 5 and 6a: GerhardtJohn Kelly 4b. Wie mußte doch sich schmiegen Der Vater Abraham, Eh als ihm sein Vergnügen Und rechte Wohnstatt kam! 5. Wie manche schwere Bürde Trug...

Hymns of Universal Praise (Putian Songzan, 普天頌讚) (Shanghai, 1936; Hong Kong, 1977, 2006)

Hymns of Universal Praise (Putian Songzan, 普天頌讚) (Shanghai, 1936; Hong Kong, 1977, 2006)  The first edition of Hymns of Universal Praise (hereafter HUP) (Shanghai, 1936) was a project led by Chinese theologian and hymnwriter Timothy T'ing Fang Lew* (Liu) (劉廷芳) (1891–1947) and edited by Methodist missionary Bliss Wiant* (1895–1975). It was published in China as a joint project of six colonial denominations who had established mission work in pre-Communist China. Andrew Granade and Anping Wu...

Romanian hymns and hymnody

As inhabitants of the territory north of the Lower Danube, Romanians participated in Byzantine culture, in common with most Christian peoples in the region. The principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia were established in the 14th century and organized into two metropolitan churches dependent on Constantinople. This was followed by the spreading of Slavonic hymns and, secondarily, of Greek hymns, in forms almost identical to those of the Romanians' southern neighbours. Hymn books spread from...

Lucie Eddie Campbell-Williams

CAMPBELL-WILLIAMS, Lucie Eddie. b. Duck Hill, Mississippi, 30 April 1885; d. Nashville, Tennessee, 3 January 1963.  Early years, education, and career Hymn writer, singer, music director, educator, and mentor to scores of African American church musicians, Campbell, one of nine children, was the daughter of formerly enslaved African Americans in Mississippi. She rose to be one of the most important figures of her era in African American gospel song, and the most prominent voice in shaping the...

Presbyterian hymnody, Canadian

Presbyterian hymnody, Canadian Canadian Presbyterian congregations for the most part have adopted hymnals sanctioned by their General Assemblies for congregational singing of hymns: Hymnal of the Presbyterian Church in Canada was issued in 1880 (full music edition in 1881), and The Book of Praise in 1897, 1918, 1972 and 1997. Two seminal figures in the hymnody of the early Presbyterian Church in Canada were Daniel James Macdonnell (1843-1896), whose career within the church is extensively...

Jesu, my Lord, my God, my all

Jesu, my Lord, my God, my all. Henry Collins* (1827-1919). Published in Collins's Hymns for Missions (Leeds, 1854, later republished in London), the book compiled during his brief tenure of a post in the Church of England. It is one of only two hymns by Collins in that book. It bears a striking – and confusing – resemblance to a hymn by Frederick William Faber* for the Feast of Corpus Christi, published in his Hymns (1849) and in his Jesus and Mary (1849), beginning Jesus! my Lord, my God,...

When morning gilds the skies

When morning gilds the skies. Edward Caswall* (1814-1878). A version of this hymn in six 6-line verses was published in A Collection of Catholic Hymns, edited by H. Formby and J. Lambert (1853). A longer version was printed in Caswall's The Masque of Mary, and Other Poems (1858). It was in 28 couplets, with a third line, 'May Jesus Christ be praised', printed (after the first couplet) as a refrain, 'May, &c'. It is a translation of a German hymn, 'Beim frühen Morgenlicht' ('At early...

Christe qui lux es et dies

Christe qui lux es et dies. Latin, before 9th century, author unknown. This hymn is in the Ambrosian metre, but is thought not to be by him.'Christe qui lux es et dies' was quoted by Hincmar of Rheims in his controversy with Gottschalk of Orbais*, in Hincmar's Collectio de una et non trina deitate (857). See JJ, p. 227. It was included in the Old Hymnal. The hymn is mentioned in Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 28118, an early 9th century manuscript containing Caesarius of Arles Rule...

Blest is the man whose softening heart

Blest is the man whose softening heart. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1743-1825). This text is taken from the hymn beginning 'Behold, where breathing love divine'*, first published in her friend William Enfield*'s Hymns for Public Worship: selected from various authors, and intended as a supplement to Dr Watts's Psalms (Warrington, 1772),  where it was entitled 'Christian Charity'. It had eight stanzas. The present hymn starts at stanza 3. It was published in Barbauld's Poems (1773) as 'Hymn IV'...

James Lyon

LYON, James. b. Newark, New Jersey, 1 July 1735; d. Machias, Maine, 12 October 1794.  Lyon was a Presbyterian minister, patriot, tunebook compiler, and composer.  He is known primarily for compiling the tunebook Urania. Lyon was the son of Zopher Lyon (1717-1744) and Mary Wood Lyon (1716-1746).   Little is known of his childhood and musical training.  He attended the College of New Jersey, then known as Nassau Hall, a large building completed in 1756 (now Princeton University).  The 1759...

Churches of Christ hymnody, USA

The Churches of Christ in the United States trace their beginnings to 1906 when they became generally recognized as a distinct Christian group of congregations. These congregations were previously associated with the Restoration Movement, also known as the Stone-Campbell Movement (Foster, p. 1779; see Disciples of Christ hymnody*). Because there are no national administrative offices, boards, publishing houses, or conferences, it is difficult to refer to them as a 'denomination'. Indeed, there...

Public School hymnody

British Public School hymnody. 'What is a college without a chapel?' Bishop Christopher Wordsworth* asked a canon of Winchester Cathedral. 'An angel without wings' was the reply. This incident neatly expresses the central importance of daily worship in the life of a Victorian educational institution in Britain. Wordsworth was referring to a teacher training college, but his remark applied equally to a public school. It was these leading boys' schools that educated many of the professional men...

In Gottes Namen fahren wir

In Gottes Namen fahren wir. German, 13th century and after. This is the German pilgrims' hymn, probably dating from the time when pilgrimages became an important part of the religious life of the Middle Ages. For those who could travel, there were journeys to be made from all parts of Europe to Jerusalem, Rome, or Santiago de Compostella, and in England to Canterbury or Durham. 'The five hundred years from the early eleventh to the early sixteenth century were the golden age of pilgrimage in...

John Keble

KEBLE, John. b. Fairford, Gloucestershire, 25 April 1792; d. Bournemouth, 29 March 1866. The son of a clergyman, he was educated at home and at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, to which he won a scholarship in 1806, at the age of 14. He graduated with a 'Double First' (First Class in Honour Moderations and in Finals) in 1811. He took Holy Orders (deacon 1815, priest 1816), and became a Tutor at Oriel College in 1817. As a young and brilliant figure in Oxford, he exercised a considerable...

Lord, in this Thy mercy's day

Lord, in this Thy mercy's day. Isaac Williams* (1802-1865). This is from Williams's The Baptistery; or, The Way of Eternal Life (1842). This book consisted of 32 'Images'. This hymn was from 'Image the Twenty-second', a long poem entitled 'The Day of Days; or, the Great Manifestation'. It had 105 three-line stanzas (the stanza form probably modelled on the 'Dies irae, dies illa'*). It was prefaced by Ecclesiastes 12: 14: 'God shall bring every work into judgement, with every secret thing,...

O Welt, ich muss dich lassen

O Welt, ich muss dich lassen. Attributed to Johannes Hesse* (1490-1547). This is a religious adaptation of an Austrian song, 'Innsbruck, ich muß dich laßen', a traditional folk song (see 'Austrian hymnody'*). It is printed in two texts by Wackernagel, Das Deutsche Kirchenlied III. 952-4, both of which emphasise the journey to heaven rather than a worldly journey. Wackernagel speculates that it was written for a particular person or special event. JJ (where the hymn is found under 'Hesse')...

O Word of God above

O Word of God above. Isaac Williams* (1802-1865). First published in the publication that was sympathetic to Tractarian views and to the Oxford Movement*, the British Magazine, in July 1837. It was then included in Williams's  Hymns translated from the Parisian Breviary (1839). It was a translation of a hymn by a Jesuit, Charles Guiet (1601-1664), beginning 'Patris aeterni soboles coaeva' ('Issue of the eternal Father') published in a Paris Breviary of 1680 and in later editions. In 1839...

R.R. Chope

CHOPE, Richard Robert. b. 21 September 1830; d. 29 May 1928. He received his education at Exeter College, Oxford (BA 1855). A year later he took Holy Orders and became curate of Holy Trinity, Stapleton, north east of Bristol, whose new Gothic church, built by John Norton, was opened in 1857. Although Chope was at Stapleton for no more than two years, his interest in the activities of the church choir there, the current enthusiasm for hymn-singing and the publication of new hymnbooks, encouraged...

William John Copeland

COPELAND, William John. b. Chigwell, Essex, 1 September 1804; d. Farnham, Surrey, 25 August 1885. He was educated at St Paul's School and Trinity College, Oxford (BA 1829, MA 1831, BD 1840). He was a Fellow of the College, and Dean (1832-49). During this time he translated and edited Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians, and Homilies on the Epistle to the Ephesians of S John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople (Oxford, 1848).  He took Holy Orders ( deacon 1829, priest 1830) and...

Fisk Jubilee Singers

The original Jubilee Singers was a choral group of students sponsored by Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee (founded 1866), and sponsored by the American Missionary Association (see Anderson 2010). From Oct. 1872 until June 1878 the singers toured the northern U.S. and England, Scotland, Ireland, Holland, Switzerland, and Germany singing a repertory of hymns, parlor songs, and most significantly, spirituals. They were responsible for popularizing spirituals in mainstream white society and...

Dorothy Helen Stone

STONE, D (orothy) Helen. Dates unknown, late 19th or early 20th century (unconfirmed b. Bristol, 1890; d. Bristol 16 April 1954). This author contributed four hymns to Hosanna: A Book of Praise for Young Children, ed. T. Grigg-Smith, Charles Wood* and H. Middleton (1930). One of them, 'For sunshine and the whistling breeze' was in The School Hymn-Book of the Methodist Church (1950); another, 'I can picture Jesus toiling'*, became much better known. It was included in CP, CH3, and WOV. Except...

Edward Hopper

HOPPER, Edward. b. New York City, 17 February 1816; d. New York City, 23 April 1888 [not to be confused with the USA painter Edward Hopper, 1882-1967]. Hopper graduated from New York University (1839), and Union Theological Seminary (1842). He led the Sag Harbor Presbyterian Church on Long Island for 11 years, and spent the remainder of his life at the Church of the Sea and Land, in New York City, where he became well-known for his ministry to sailors; nautical imagery is apparent in his best...

Elizabeth Lee Smith

SMITH, Elizabeth Lee (née Allen). b. 3 September 1817; d. 1898, date unknown. Born Elizabeth Allen, she was the daughter of William Allen (1808-1882), a distinguished clergyman and academic who became President of Dartmouth College (1817-20) and of Bowdoin College (1820-39). Her father edited a collection, Psalms and Hymns (1835). Elizabeth married (1843) Henry Boynton Smith (1815-1877), who later (1850) became a Professor at Union Theological Seminary, New York. She was a good linguist,...

John Berridge

BERRIDGE, John. b. Kingston, Nottinghamshire, 1 March 1716; d. Everton, Bedfordshire, 22 January 1793. He was educated at Clare Hall, Cambridge (BA 1738, MA 1732). He took Holy Orders, and was a Fellow of Clare (now Clare College). He was curate of Stapleford, near Cambridge (1749-55), and then vicar of Everton, near Potton, Bedfordshire, from 1755 until his death. He was chaplain to the Earl of Buchan. He was associated with Methodists of both kinds (Calvinist and Arminian), and was friendly...

Nellie Talbot

TALBOT, Ellen Winnifred ('Nellie'). b. 1871; d. 31 March 1959. Until recently little was known about Nellie Talbot, but one identification has her date of birth and death as above. She is thought to have lived in Missouri, and to have taught Sunday school there. The other story about her, which may or may not be true, is that she visited London as part of a delegation of Sunday-school teachers, and that she wrote 'Jesus wants me for a sunbeam'* when she was there. This must have been before...

William Henry Parker

PARKER, William Henry. b. Basford, Nottingham, 4 March 1845; d. Basford, 2 December 1929. He was apprenticed as a machine-constructor in a lace-making factory, and later worked for an insurance company, of which he became head. He became an active member of Chelsea Street Baptist Church, Nottingham, and a teacher in the Sunday School. He published a book of verse, The Princess Alice and Other Poems (1882), and wrote hymns for Sunday School Anniversaries. Ten were printed in the Sunday School...

William Ralph Featherston

FEATHERSTON, William Ralph.  b. Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 23 July 1846; d. Montreal, 20 May 1873. Featherston died at the age of 26, and little is known about his life. He was a member of the Wesleyan Methodist church in Montreal. He is normally accepted as the author of the famous Gospel hymn, 'My Jesus I love Thee, I know Thou art mine'*. Information about this hymn is uncertain, but it is believed to have been written at some point between 1858 and 1864, when it was published anonymously in...

Anna Bartlett Warner

WARNER, Anna Bartlett. b. New York, 31 August 1827; d. Constitution Island, 22 January 1915. Born at New York, she moved with her family in 1837 to a farmhouse on Constitution Island, on the Hudson River, after the failure of her father's real estate speculation. She and her sister, Susan Bogert Warner*, wrote many novels, Susan very successfully; Anna used the pseudonym 'Amy Lothrop'. She also wrote hymns for the Sunday school, and translated hymns from French and German. She edited Hymns of...

Elisha Hoffman

HOFFMAN, Elisha Albright. b. Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania, 7 May 1839; d. Chicago, Illinois, 25 November 1929. Hoffman was an Evangelical Association minister's son (his middle name was given in honour of the founder of the Association, Jacob Albright). After fighting on the Union side in the Civil War, he attended Union Bible Seminary in New Berlin, Pennsylvania, and was ordained in 1868 by the Evangelical Association. He worked with the Association's publishing arm in Cleveland, Ohio (1868-79)....

Father, I adore you

Father, I adore you. Terry Coelho* (1952- ). Dated 1972, this was copyrighted by Maranatha! Music. It has three stanzas. The first is 'Father, I adore you/ And I lay my life before you/ How I love you'. The second stanza begins 'Jesus…' and the third 'Spirit…'. It has become very popular, and is translated into other languages. JRW

Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ

Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ. Martin Luther* (1483-1546), stanzas 2-7; pre-Reformation, stanza 1. The first stanza of this hymn dates from the 14th century: it is one of the German hymns found in the Medingen collections (see Northern German devotional manuscripts*) . It exists in a number of German forms, deriving from the Christmas Latin sequence 'Grates nunc omnes reddamus Domino Deo, qui sua nativitate nos liberavit de diabolica potestate' ('Now let all give thanks to God, who in his...

Henri Friedrich Hemy

HEMY, Henri Friedrich. b. Newcastle upon Tyne, 12 November 1818; d. Hartlepool, County Durham, 10 June 1888. Born to Roman Catholic German parents (the name is pronounced 'Hemmy'), he was educated at Newcastle and became organist of St Andrew's Church (Catholic) in the city. He taught at Tynemouth and then at Ushaw College, Durham. He published Easy Hymn Tunes with the Words in full, adapted for Catholic Schools (1851) and a highly regarded instruction book for the piano (1858). He is chiefly...

He stood before the court

He stood before the court. Christopher Martin Idle* (1938- ). This hymn for Passiontide was written at Limehouse, east London, in June 1980. Idle had been moved by an address by Gordon Fyles, then ministering in Islington, London, on John 19. Fyles showed that Jesus was our representative not only on the cross but also at his trial: his silence before Pilate, and the reference to Romans 8: 1, follow from that. The verb 'to stand' has a long history as a signifier of steadfastness, from...

Ludämilia Elisabeth Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt

SCHWARZBURG-RUDOLSTADT, Ludämilia Elisabeth. b. Heidecksberg, near Rudolstadt, 7 April 1640; d. Rudolstadt, 12 March 1672. Of noble birth, she was privately educated at Rudolstadt: she was 'a good Latin scholar, and well read in divinity and other branches of learning' (JJ, p. 701). From 1665 to 1670 she lived with her mother at the castle of Friedensburg. On her return to Rudolstadt she was engaged to be married, but an epidemic of measles carried off her sister, Sophie Juliane. Nursing her,...

That boy-child of Mary

That boy-child of Mary. Tom Colvin* (1925-2000). Written in Malawi to a traditional dance tune. The theme of naming reflects the fact that in Africa generally the name given is carefully chosen to express the hopes the family has for the child or to record the events associated with his/her birth. Here, through the naming of Jesus and the circumstances of his birth, the meaning of the Incarnation is simply and tellingly expressed. The song is shared between a soloist and a wider...

The happy morn is come

The happy morn is come. Thomas Haweis* (1734-1820). From Haweis's Carmina Christo, or, Hymns to the Saviour (1792). It is an Easter hymn, with the second line normally 'Triumphant o'er the grave', though there are variations. In the USA it was reprinted in The Sabbath Hymn Book: for the Service of Song in the House of the Lord, edited by Lowell Mason*, Edwards Amasa Park, and Austin Phelps (New York and Boston, 1858) as 'The happy morn is come' with a reference to Psalm 68: 18: 'Thou hast led...

Anna Sophia

ANNA SOPHIA, Countess of Hesse-Darmstadt. b. Marburg, 17 Dec 1638; d. Quedlinburg, 13 Dec 1683. She was the daughter of the Landgrave (Count) Georg II. She chose a convent life, and in 1657 was elected Pröpstin (lady provost) of the aristocratic Fürsten-Töchter Stift (the prince's daughter's foundation), a Lutheran institute at Quedlinburg. She was elected Abbess in 1680. She wrote Der Treue Seelen-Freund Christus Jesus mit nachdenklichen Sinn-Gemählden, anmuthigen Lehr-Gedichten und neuen...

Herbert Brokering

BROKERING, Herbert Frederick. b. Beatrice, Nebraska, 21 May 1926; d. Bloomington, Minneapolis, 7 Nov 2009. Born into a Lutheran pastor's home, Brokering studied at Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa; the University of Iowa (MA, 1947); and Trinity [Lutheran] Theological Seminary in Columbus, Ohio (BD, 1950). He did further studies at the University of Pittsburgh and at the universities in Erlangen and Kiel, Germany. After serving as a parish pastor in Lutheran congregations in Cedarhurst, New...

Hilf, Herr Jesu, laß gelingen

Hilf, Herr Jesu, laß gelingen. Johann Rist* (1600-1667). First published in Johann Risten himlische Lieder (Lüneburg, 1642), with the title 'Ein Neu Jahresgesang/ Welches Anfang/Mittel und Ende in und mit dem süssen Namen Jesu bestebet' ('A new-year song, of which the beginning, middle and end are sanctified in and with the sweet name of Jesus'). It had sixteen 6-line stanzas. It is found in the 'Jahreswende' section of EG in six verses (EG 61). The missing verses are 2 ('Alles wass Ich...

Harriet Burn McKeever

McKEEVER, Harriet Burn. b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 28 August 1807; d. Chester, Pennsylvania, 7 February 1886 or 1887. A member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, McKeever taught for 36 years in a girls' school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was also a successful author of novels, mainly on religious themes and for young women, several of which are still available in digital/printed form. An example is Edith's Ministry (Philadelphia, 1860), which traces the life of the eldest daughter...

John Edgar Park

PARK, John Edgar. b. Belfast, Northern Ireland, 7 March 1879; d. Cambridge, Massachusetts, 4 March 1956. Park was educated at the Queen's University of Belfast (then Queen's College), and thereafter at Universities of Dublin, Edinburgh, Leipzig, Munich, Oxford and Princeton. His time at Princeton was followed by permanent residence in the USA: he became a Presbyterian minister, serving in the lumber camps of the Adirondack Mountains in upper New York State. He then became a Congregational...

Low in the grave he lay

Low in the grave he lay. Robert Lowry* (1826-1899). Written in 1874, this was published in Brightest and Best (New York, 1875), one of the many publications edited by Lowry and William Howard Doane*, and later in Gospel Hymns No 5 (New York, 1887). Its triumphant statement of the Easter message is expressed in the short stanzas and longer refrain, and in the rhythms and melodies of Lowry's vigorous tune:   Low in the grave he lay,    Jesus, my Saviour;  Waiting the coming day,    Jesus, my...

David Willcocks

WILLCOCKS, (Sir) David Valentine. b. Newquay, Cornwall, 30 December 1919; d. Cambridge, 17 September 2015. A chorister at Westminster Abbey between 1929 and 1933, and a schoolboy at Clifton College, he pursued his musical studies at the Royal College of Music before going on to King's College, Cambridge as an organ scholar during the period of Boris Ord* (1897-1961, see 'Adam lay y-bounden'*) as director of music. There he also held the John Stewart of Rannoch scholarship in sacred music, as...

John Brownlie

BROWNLIE, John. b. Glasgow, 3 August 1857; d. Crieff, Perthshire, 18 November 1925. He was educated at the University of Glasgow and the Free Church College, Glasgow. He was licensed by the Presbytery of Glasgow in 1884, and was appointed assistant minister, Trinity Free Church of Scotland, Portpatrick, Wigtownshire (south-west Scotland). He remained there for most of his life, succeeding the senior minister in 1890 and becoming a distinguished and active participant in local affairs (for...

Our earth we now lament to see

Our earth we now lament to see. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788).                                  This was 'Hymn II' in Hymns of Intercession for All Mankind (1758). It was entitled 'For Peace'. The hymns are an extraordinary demonstration of Methodist loyalty in time of war, with Hymn X entitled 'For His Majesty King George', Hymn XI 'For the Prince of Wales', followed by no fewer than four hymns 'For the King of Prussia'. Others are 'For the Magistrates', 'For the Parliament', 'For the Army',...

God be in my head

God be in my head. 15th century, author and provenance unknown. The first trace of this very moving verse is in a French text dating from ca. 1490: Jesus soit en ma teste et mon entendement. Jesus soit en mes yeulx et mon regardement. Jesus soit en ma bouche et mon parlement. Jesus soit en mon cueur et en mon pensement. Jesus soit en ma vie et mon trespassement. Amen. The English text is found in a Book of Hours printed by Robert Pynson at London, Hore beate marie/virginis ad vsum in/signis ac...

Loving Creator

Loving Creator. Daniel Thambyrajah Niles* (1908-1970). This is the version in CH4 of Niles's Trinitarian hymn addressed in its three verses to the three persons of the Holy Trinity, beginning 'Father in heaven'*. In verse 1 the CH4 version avoids the image of 'Father' for God, changing the first line, and also lines 7-8 from 'Father in heaven,/ Father, our God' to 'Loving Creator,/ Parent and God'. Verses 2 and 3 also have substantial alterations from Niles's...

Olajida Olude

OLUDE, (A. T.) Olajida. b. 16 July 1908; d. c. 1986. A Nigerian Methodist minister, Olude was educated at Wesley College, Ibadan, and at the Mindola training school. He was awarded the Order of Niger and, from the University of Nigeria, the Mus.D. degree (Young, 808). A.M. Jones describes Olude as 'profoundly upset by the way European-type hymns murdered his language' (Jones, 1976). Jones also notes that Olude built up a collection of at least 77 hymns whose melodies followed precisely the...

Souls of men! why will ye scatter

Souls of men! why will ye scatter. Frederick William Faber* (1814-1863). First published in eight verses in Oratory Hymns (1854), and expanded in Faber's Hymns (1862) to thirteen verses, with the title 'Come to Jesus'. It is frequently shortened, and the order of verses is different in many books. The most common opening in modern books is now Faber's verse 4, beginning 'There's a wideness in God's mercy'*. This not only avoids the non-inclusive language of the original opening line, but has...

Saviour, like a shepherd lead us

Saviour, like a shepherd lead us. Probably by Dorothea Ann Thrupp* (1779-1847). First printed in the Revd William Carus Wilson's magazine, The Children's Friend (June 1838), signed 'Lyte' (though in a different manner from a hymn attributed to Lyte in January 1838). It was then printed in Thrupp's Hymns for the Young (ca. 1830, Fourth Edition, 1836) but without an author's name.  It was found in many books including the Church Hymnary (1898) and RCH, MHB, and the Salvation Army Song Book (1953...

John Webster Grant

GRANT, John Webster. b. Truro, Nova Scotia, 27 June 1919; d. Toronto, 16 December 2006. He was educated at Pictou Academy and Dalhousie University, Halifax (BA 1938, MA 1941). He attended Princeton University on a graduate scholarship before enrolling in Pine Hill Divinity Hall at Halifax. Ordained to the ministry of the United Church of Canada in 1943, he was appointed director of information to the non-Roman Catholic churches with the Wartime Information Board and chaplain to the Royal...

Komitas

KOMITAS. Komitas I Aghtsetsi, Catholicos of All Armenians. b. ca. 560; d. 628. A well-known churchman, poet, and musician. When he was Catholicos (primate) of the Armenian church (615-628) the relics of a group of nuns, headed by Gayanē and including Hrip'simē, who was of famed beauty, were discovered in Edjmiadsin. Komitas constructed the Church of St. Hrip'simē in 618, where the remains were interned, and composed the hymn 'Andzink' nvirealk'' ('Devoted souls') to celebrate the occasion. He...

O holy night, the stars are brightly shining

O holy night, the stars are brightly shining. John Sullivan Dwight* (1813-1893), from the French of Placide Cappeau* (1808-1877). This is a translation of Placide Cappeau's Christmas hymn, 'Minuit, chrétiens, c'est l'heure solennelle'*. It dates from 1855. An edition with French and German texts only was published in England in 1852; another (n.d., with English words by C.L. Kenney) was one of many published in England and France. In the USA 'O holy night' appeared in the Plymouth...

Robert Brown-Borthwick

BROWN-BORTHWICK, Robert. b. Aberdeen, 18 May 1840; d. 17 March 1894 . He was educated at St Mary Hall, Oxford, then an independent Hall associated with the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, now a part of Oriel College. He took Holy Orders in 1865, serving  curacies at Sudeley, Gloucestershire (1865-66), Evesham, Worcestershire (1866-68). He became Assistant Minister of Quebec Chapel (1868-69), Incumbent of the Chapel of the Holy Trinity, Grange in Borrowdale, near Keswick (1869-86), and...

Samuel Wesley (III)

WESLEY, Samuel (III). b. Bristol, 24 February 1766; d. 11 October 1837. He was the younger son of Charles Wesley*, the nephew of John Wesley*, the brother of Charles Wesley (II)*, and the father of Samuel Sebastian Wesley*. He converted to Roman Catholicism in 1784, and although he did not remain for long an observant Roman Catholic, he retained a love of, and fascination with, Roman Catholic church music and ritual for the rest of his life. For many years he was involved with the music of the...

Walford Davies

DAVIES, (Sir) (Henry) Walford. b. Oswestry, Shropshire, 6 September 1869; d. Wrington, Somerset, 11 March 1941. He was a choirboy and pupil-assistant at St George's Chapel, Windsor (1882-90), before studying at the Royal College of Music under Parry*, Stanford*, and Rockstro* (1890-94), where he taught counterpoint (1895-1903). As organist of the Temple Church (1898-1923) his career as a choral conductor and composer developed rapidly. He was professor of music at University College,...

Jesu, joy of man's desiring

Jesu, joy of man's desiring. Attributed to Robert Bridges* (1844-1930).  The music used with this text is known better than the poem. The tune is familiar primarily through its arrangement by Johann Sebastian Bach* taken from Cantata 147, 'Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben' ('Heart and mouth and deed and life'), composed in 1723 during his first year as Cantor at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. As was Bach's compositional practice, he borrowed sections of this Cantata from an Advent Cantata written in...

Mary Dagworthy James

JAMES, Mary Dagworthy (née Yard). b. Trenton, New Jersey, 10 August 1810; d. New York City, 4 October 1883. Her father was a Quaker and her mother a Baptist, but she was converted at a Methodist revival meeting as a child, and began teaching Sunday school in the Methodist Episcopal church when she was thirteen years old. She married Henry B. James in 1834. They moved to Mount Holly, New Jersey, returning to Trenton in 1853, where she helped to found a home for distressed and orphaned children....

One, only one, shall be the fold

One, only one, shall be the fold. Friedrich Adolf Krummacher* (1767-1845), translated by Catharine Hannah Dunn* (1815-1863). This is Dunn's translation of Krummacher's hymn, 'Eine Heerde und ein Hirt'*, in her Hymns from the German (1857), where it is called 'The Blessed Hope'. Her translation of the stanza above uses the Biblical 'fold' (from John 10: 16) in preference to Krummacher's 'Heerde' ('flock'). Her translation of the first stanza was: One, only one, shall be the fold,   And one the...

O may the Son of God enfold you

O may the Son of God enfold you ('Spirit Song'). John Wimber* (1934-1997).  'Spirit Song' is the most lasting musical contribution of Wimber's contributions to congregational song, though written in 1979 before the movement was formed and before it became known as the Vineyard Fellowship.  Stanza one begins with an image of Christ, inviting 'The Son of God' to 'enfold' the worshipper 'with his Spirit and love'. The song encourages an intimate relationship between the singer and Christ through...

Peace, perfect peace, in this dark world of sin

Peace, perfect peace, in this dark world of sin. Edward Henry Bickersteth* (1825-1906). Written at Harrogate in 1875, when Bickersteth was on holiday there. He heard a sermon by the vicar of Harrogate, William Wynter Gibbon, on the text 'Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee' (Isaiah 26: 3). On that Sunday afternoon, he visited an elderly dying relative, Archdeacon Hill. He found the archdeacon troubled in mind, and wrote the hymn to provide spiritual comfort. He...

Alfred Barry

BARRY, Alfred. b. London, 15 January 1826; d. Windsor, 1 April 1910. He was the son of the architect of the Houses of Parliament, Sir Charles Barry. He was educated at King's College, London (1841-44) and Trinity College, Cambridge (1844-48; BA 1848, MA 1851). He was briefly a Fellow of Trinity College, and took Holy Orders (deacon 1850, priest 1853). By that time he had become sub-Warden of Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, an independent school of the Scottish Episcopal Church founded...

Almighty Father, who dost give

Almighty Father, who dost give. John Howard Bertram Masterman* (1867-1933). First published in In Hoc Signo: hymns of war and peace (1914), with music edited by Walford Davies*. It is eminently suitable for war time, but because the sentiments are general, it can be seen as a hymn for various purposes: after the war of 1914-1918 it came to be seen as a hymn for World Peace and Brotherhood (the heading of the section in which it appears in MHB). It could also be used for missions: it appeared...

Birgitte Katerine Boye

BOYE, Birgitte Katerine (née Johansen). b. Gentofte, Denmark, 7 March 1742; d. 17 October 1824. Born into a family in the king's service, she was married to Herman Hertz, one of the king's foresters. He was appointed forester of Vordingborg, in the south of Zealand, in 1763. Birgitte bore him four children, and also found time to study German, French and English: she translated hymns into Danish from these languages. She was discovered as a hymn writer when a new hymn book to replace that of...

Bryan Jeffery Leech

LEECH, Bryan Jeffery. b. Buckhurst Hill, Essex, England, 14 May 1931; d. Walnut Creek, California, 30 June 2015. Leech was educated at London Bible College, and pastored a church in Surrey before emigration to the USA in 1955; with further study at Barrington College in Massachusetts (BA, MA), North Park Seminary, Chicago; and Westmont College, Santa Barbara, California. He was ordained in 1959 in the Evangelical Covenant Church and pastored churches in Boston, Massachusetts; Montclair, New...

Come, Holy Ghost, our souls inspire

Come, Holy Ghost, our souls inspire. John Cosin* (1595-1672). This is probably the best known of the many English translations of the medieval Latin hymn 'Veni creator spiritus'*. It was first printed in Cosin's A Collection of Private Devotions in the Practice of the Ancient Church (1627), where it was assigned to the Third Hour, at which the Holy Ghost was traditionally thought to have descended at Pentecost. It may have been written for the coronation of King Charles I in 1625, at which...

Edward Hayes Plumptre

PLUMPTRE, Edward Hayes. b. London, 6 August 1821; d. Wells, Somerset, 1 February 1891. The son of a solicitor, Plumptre was educated at home, at King's College, London, and at University College, Oxford, where he took a 'double first' (in Honour Moderations and in Finals). He was a Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford (1844-47). He married Theodosia, the sister of the theologian F.D. Maurice, in 1847. He joined the staff of King's College London, where he was chaplain (1847-68), Professor of...

Felice Giardini

GIARDINI, Felice. b. Turin, Italy, 12 April 1716; d. Moscow, 8 June 1796. He was a chorister in Milan Cathedral and was a pupil of Paldini before studying the violin under G. B. Somis. It was as a violinist that he became well known, both as an orchestral player and a soloist, particularly for his prowess as an embellisher of melody. After a period at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples, he travelled throughout Germany and France before arriving in London where, according to Charles Burney, he made...

George Bell

BELL, George Kennedy Allen. b. Hayling Island, near Chichester, 4 February 1883; d. Canterbury, 3 October 1958. He was the son of a clergyman, who later moved to Southampton, Pershore and Balsall Heath, Birmingham. George was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford (1901-05). He trained for the priesthood at Wells Theological College (deacon 1907, priest 1908), serving his curacy at Leeds. After a period back at Christ Church as tutor and then Student (i.e., Fellow), he was...

In the Lord's atoning grief

In the Lord's atoning grief. Bonaventura da Bagnoregio* (ca. 1217-1247), translated by Frederick Oakeley* (1802-1880). St Bonaventura's hymn was written for Matins at the Office of the Holy Cross; one account is that it was written at the request of King Louis IX of France (Saint Louis, King from 1226 to 1270). It began 'In passione Domini, qua datur salus homini'. Oakeley's translation was written when he was still an Anglican, and printed in his Devotions Commemorative of the Passion (1842)....

Iesu, Rex admirabilis

Iesu, Rex admirabilis. Latin, 12th Century.  This is one of the many hymns taken from 'Iesu dulcis memoria'* (cf. 'Iesu dulcedo cordium'*). James Mearns* noted a selection consisting of stanzas 9, 11, 4, 14 from the Bodleian Library manuscript and a further stanza beginning 'Te nostra Iesu vox sonet' (JJ, p. 588). The selection of stanzas varies. Mearns has:   Jesu, Rex admirabilis  Amor Jesu dulcissimus  Jesu, dulcedo cordium  Cum digne loqui nequeam  Te nostra Iesu vox sonet  Two...

John Antes

ANTES, John (Johann). b. Frederick, Pennsylvania, 24 March 1740; d. Bristol, England, 17 December 1811. Born near the Moravian Church community of Bethlehem, Antes was educated at the Moravian Boys' School in Bethlehem, where his talent in music was encouraged. During the early 1760s, he established an instrument-making atelier in Bethlehem where he crafted violins, violas, and violoncellos (he is known to have made at least seven instruments, of which two are still extant). Feeling the call of...

Joseph Simpson Cook

COOK, Joseph Simpson. b. County Durham, England, 4 December 1859; d. Toronto, Ontario, 27 May 1933. He emigrated to Georgetown, Ontario, entering the Methodist ministry as a probationer with London Conference in 1880, serving Bayfield Mission on the eastern shore of Lake Huron from 1881 until 1883. He enrolled in a combined course in Arts and Theology at McGill University and Wesleyan Theological College, being ordained in 1885. He earned an MA from Illinois Wesleyan University (1892), a BD...

John Stewart Murray

MURRAY, John Stewart. b. Invercargill, New Zealand, 5 November 1929; d. 17 February 2017. The son of a pioneer Scottish settler family, John Murray was educated at King's High School and the University of Otago, Dunedin. After graduating (MA 1952), he studied at King's College, Cambridge, from 1952 to 1955, completing an MA in Divinity in 1954, followed by a period of study at the Graduate School, Bossey Ecumenical Institute, Geneva, where he was awarded a Diploma in Ecumenical Studies. He...

My God, I love Thee, not because

My God, I love Thee, not because. Latin, attributed to St Francis Xavier* (?) (1506-1552), translated by Edward Caswall* (1814-1878). The Latin text, 'O Deus ego amo te', is found in the Coeleste Palmetum (Cologne, 1669) of a Jesuit priest, Wilhelmus Nakatenus. It was a translation of a Spanish sonnet, 'No me mueve, mi Dios, para quererte', which was printed in Epitome de la vida y muerte de San Ignacio de Loyola (Roermond, 1662). It is said that this was used daily by St Ignatius in his...

O God of earth and altar

O God of earth and altar. Gilbert Keith Chesterton* (1874-1936). First published in EH (1906), and subsequently included in many hymnals. It has often been stated that it appeared in the Christian Social Union magazine The Commonwealth, but this is not so (see Bernard Massey, 'O God of earth and altar. A Cautionary Tale', Bulletin of the Hymn Society, 220, July 1999, pp. 240-1). The story that Chesterton wrote it for the tune AURELIA, which he thought 'the typical tune for hymns', is a...

O what can little hands do

O what can little hands do. Probably by Grace Webster Hinsdale* (1833-1907). Published in The Church Missionary Juvenile Instructor for May 1862, with the signature 'Farin' (Hinsdale's usual pseudonym). It was chosen for the Scottish Church Hymnary (1898), and described by John Brownlie* as 'far removed from the namby-pamby stuff which so many think good material for children's worship' (1911, p. 283). Originally the hymn had five stanzas, beginning: O what can little hands do   To please...

Sing Alleluya forth ye saints on high

Sing Alleluya forth ye saints on high. George Timms* (1910-1997).  Timms often re-worked earlier hymns. This is clearly written in imitation of 'Sing Alleluia forth in duteous praise'*, the translation of 'Alleluia piis edite laudibus' by John Ellerton*, found in the Appendix (1868) to the First Edition of A&M and in Church Hymns (1871; Church Hymns with Tunes, 1874). This had become very popular when set to ALLELUIA PERENNE by William Henry Monk* for the early editions, or later to a...

Thomas Binney

BINNEY, Thomas. b. Newcastle upon Tyne, 30 April 1798; d. Clapton, London, 24 February 1874. Born into a Scottish family, he was an apprenticed to a bookseller; he studied English literature, and taught himself Latin and Greek; he then applied to train as a minister at Wymondley College, Hertfordshire. He was minister of the New Meeting, an Independent chapel at Bedford (1823) and at St James' Street Chapel, Newport, Isle of Wight (1824), before being appointed to the distinguished post of...

The Sacred Harp

The Sacred Harp (Philadelphia: T. K. & P. G. Collins, 1844) is a 'Collection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes, Odes, and Anthems; selected from the most eminent authors, together with nearly one hundred pieces never before published…well adapted to churches of every denomination, singing schools, and private societies, with plain rules for learners', by B. F. White* and Elisha J. King*, of Hamilton, Georgia. The Preface consists of a main paragraph dated April, 1844 followed by the name B. F....

The Church of God a kingdom is

The Church of God a kingdom is. Lionel Boulton Campbell Lockhart Muirhead* (1845-1925). Written for Muirhead's friend Robert Bridges*, and included in Part III of the Yattendon Hymnal* (1898). It was included in EH, and subsequently in the Standard Edition of A&M (1922) and in SofP. It is now a well-known item in Church of England books (A&MR, A&MNS, A&MCP, NEH), and it is found in BBCHB and in the Roman Catholic Parish Hymn Book (1968). In the USA it was printed in H40, and it...

William Henry Draper

DRAPER, William Henry. b. Kenilworth, Warwickshire, 19 December 1855; d. Clifton, Bristol, 9 August 1933. He was educated at Cheltenham College and Keble College, Oxford (BA 1879, MA 1880). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1880, priest 1881) and was successively curate of St Mary's, Shrewsbury (1880-83); vicar of Alfreton, Nottinghamshire (1883-89); vicar of Holy Cross (the Abbey), Shrewsbury (1889-99); vicar of Adel, Leeds (1899-1919); and Master of the Temple (1919-30). After retirement to...

William Kethe

KETHE, William. b. probably in the east of Scotland,, date unknown; d. Child Okeford, Dorset, before 6 June 1594. He is first heard of in the reign of Edward VI (1547-53) as a militant Protestant, author of poems attacking the Roman Catholic church. Unsurprisingly, therefore, he went into exile during the reign of Mary Tudor (1553-58), first at Frankfurt and then at Geneva, where he was closely associated with John Knox. He contributed 25 metrical psalms to the 1561 edition of The Forme of...

William Sandys

SANDYS, William. b. London, 29 October 1792; d. 18 February 1874. Sandys came from a well known Cornish family, but was born and lived in London. He was educated at Westminster School, and became a solicitor in 1814. From 1861 to 1873 he was head of the law firm of Sandys and Knott, as well as being a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. He was well trained in music (he played the cello) and collaborated in a book on the history of the violin. In 1833 he published Christmas Carols, ancient and...

Benjamin Beddome

BEDDOME, Benjamin. b. Henley-in-Arden, Warwickshire, 23 January 1717; d. Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire, 3 September 1795. He was the son of a Baptist minister. He intended to become a doctor, and was apprenticed to a Bristol surgeon; but he moved to London and became a member of the Prescott Street Baptist Church in 1739. At that church he was called to the ministry, and in 1740 he moved to Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire. He remained there as Baptist pastor for the remainder of...

Henry Kirke White

WHITE, Henry Kirke. b. Nottingham, 21 March 1785; d. Cambridge, 19 October 1806. He was destined first for the hosiery trade, and then for the law, but he showed early literary promise, publishing Clifton Grove, A Sketch in Verse, with other Poems (1803). At one time he was inclined to Deism, but his mind was changed by reading The Force of Truth: an authentic narrative by Thomas Scott, chaplain to the Lock Hospital (see 'London hospitals and their hymns'*). He was also friendly with R.W....

John Sebastian Bach Hodges

  HODGES, John Sebastian Bach.  b. Bristol, Gloucestershire, England, 12 January 1830; d. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 4 February 1895.  An Episcopal priest, Hodges composed several hymn tunes, including EUCHARISTIC HYMN, that are found in present-day hymnals. J. Sebastian B. Hodges (as his name often appears) was the son of Edward Hodges* and brother of Faustina Hasse Hodges*, George Frederick Handel Hodges (1822-1842), and Jubal Hodges (1828-1870).  The latter was also an Episcopal priest,...

Samuel John Stone

STONE, Samuel John. b. Whitmore, Staffordshire, 25 April 1839; d. Finsbury, London, 19 November 1900. He was educated at Charterhouse (1853-58), where he won a prize for English verse composition, and then as Holford Exhibitioner, Pembroke College, Oxford (1859-62). He was ordained (deacon 1862, priest 1863) at Lavington, Oxford, to serve his title at New Windsor Parish Church, in a poor district. It was for the people of New Windsor that he wrote Lyra Fidelium (1866), in which his most famous...

Thomas Clark

CLARK, Thomas. b. Canterbury, Kent, 1775 (baptised 5 February); d. Canterbury, 30 May 1859. He was the son of William Clark, a boot maker and a musician at the Wesleyan Methodist Church. Thomas completed his apprenticeship as a cordwainer in 1796 and became a Freeman of the City of Canterbury. Like his father Thomas maintained both interests and took over his father's business. It seems that his links with the Wesleyan Methodist choir at St Peter's Street Chapel were severed around 1840, about...

Clementine Tangeman

TANGEMAN, Elizabeth Clementine (née Miller). b. Columbus, Indiana, 17 February 1905; d. Columbus, Indiana, 17 January 1996. She was a philanthropist and trustee, associated with the School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary*, Yale University Institute of Sacred Music, various other institutions of higher education, and the Girl Scouts of the United States of America. She was also co-editor of Christian Hymns, copyrighted in 1945. Clementine, as she was commonly known, along with her...

Charles Price Jones

JONES, Charles Price Sr. b. Texas Valley, Georgia, 9 December 1865; d. Los Angeles, California, 19 January 1949. Preacher, hymnist, and denominational leader, Jones was baptized in 1884 and ordained in 1887. He became senior pastor of St Paul Missionary Baptist Church in Little Rock, Arkansas (1888) and graduated at Arkansas Baptist College (ca. 1893), accepting a call to Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church in Searcy, Arkansas, and serving as corresponding secretary of the Arkansas Colored...

How to reach the masses

How to reach the masses. ('Lift him up'). Johnson Oatman, Jr.* (1856–1922).  This is often known by its title as 'Lift him up'. It is difficult to determine the exact date of the hymn's composition: Hymnary.org indicates its initial publication in Golden Songs of Glory (Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, 1906), Shining Light (Atlanta, Georgia, 1906), The Star of Hope (Huntsville, Alabama, 1906)—all the same year and all in the southern United States. Following in close succession was the inclusion of...

The blood will never lose its power

The blood will never lose its power. Andraé Crouch* (1942-2015). Written when Crouch was 15, this is the title of two stanzas, beginning 'The blood that Jesus shed for me', and a refrain, 'it reaches to the highest mountain,/ it flows to the lowest valley'. Since its performance by Andraé Crouch and the Disciples and its inclusion on their CD 'Take the message everywhere' (1969) it has been a staple of gospel singing groups and their audiences. The COGICS recorded it in 1962, a song that...

Thou didst leave thy throne and thy kingly crown

Thou didst leave thy throne and thy kingly crown. Emily Elizabeth Steele Elliott* (1836-1897). Written for the choir of St Mark's, Brighton, of which her father was the incumbent, and privately printed there in 1864. It was included in several books, mostly after 1870 (see JJ, p. 1169), and published in the Church Missionary Juvenile Instructor in 1870. Elliott revised the text for her Chimes for Daily Service (1880), producing the changed wording of the refrain in stanzas 4 and 5 (in the...

By cool Siloam's shady rill

By cool Siloam's shady rill. Reginald Heber* (1783-1826). First published in the Christian Observer (April 1812), in a different metre, and beginning 'By cool Siloam's shady fountain'. It was entitled 'Christ a Pattern for Children. Luke ii. 40'. It was rewritten in the present Common Metre, and published in Heber's Hymns written and adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year (1827), for the First Sunday after Epiphany. It had six stanzas: By cool Siloam's shady rill How sweet the...

Bonaventura da Bagnoregio

Bonaventura da Bagnoregio (Giovanni di Fidanza) b. Bagnoregio, Italy, ca. 1217; d. Lyons, France, 14 July 1274. The rise of St Bonaventura from young scholar to prominent theologian and mystic, minister general of the Order of Friars Minor, prelate, and advisor of popes is one of the remarkable stories of the Middle Ages. There is no contemporary source of biographical information about Bonaventura. The earliest are a 15th-century biography by Mariano of Florence and a Chronicle of the...

Quaker hymnody

The fact that the meetings for worship of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Britain are held on the basis of silence does not mean that there were no hymns in Quaker worship in the past, nor that hymns are not sung by Quakers in other parts of the world. From the beginning of their movement in 17th-century England Quakers sang psalms, but their attitude to them differed from that of other Christian groups. Robert Barclay, the early Quaker theologian, wrote in An Apology for the...

Zimbabwean hymnody

Zimbabwean hymnody In Zimbabwe the interaction between missionaries and African musicians has yielded hymnody that captures the spirit of the country's churches. The southern region of Africa has a long history of interaction between missionaries and indigenous tribes. As African independence movements (See African hymnody*) spread throughout the 1960s, the development of hymnody conceived by Africans was influenced by the rise of African Independent (Initiated) Churches free from the...

Irish hymnody

Early Irish hymnody The arrival of Christianity in Ireland is commonly associated with the mission of St Patrick in the 5th century, though there were certainly some groups of Christians in the island at an earlier date. The early history of Irish Christianity (including details of Patrick's work) remains tantalisingly obscure, but what is certain is that, subsequently, monasticism developed rapidly in Ireland, so that from the middle of the 6th century onwards substantial monastic foundations...

A brighter dawn is breaking

A brighter dawn is breaking. Percy Dearmer* (1867-1936). Written for EH (1906) to fit the German tune SELNECKER (NUN LASST UNS GOTT DEM HERREN). Dearmer said that it was written for Eastertide 'because there was a dearth of cheerful Easter tunes' (Songs of Praise Discussed, 1933, p. 231): A brighter dawn is breaking,And earth with praise is waking;For thou, O King most highest,The power of death defiest; And thou hast come victorious,With risen Body glorious,Who now for ever livest,And life...

Anthony Petti

PETTI, Anthony (Gaetano Raphael). b. Islington, London, 12 February 1932; d. Calgary, Canada, 13 January 1985. He was educated at St Michael's College, Hitchin, Hertfordshire (1941-45) and St Ignatius' College, London (1945-50). After National Service he read English at University College, London (BA 1955, MA 1957), teaching at the College from 1960 to 1969. He was Professor of English, University of Calgary, Canada, from 1969 until his early and sudden death. Petti was a specialist in...

Auf, auf, ihr Reichgenossen

Auf, auf, ihr Reichgenossen. Johann Rist* (1607-1667). First published in Rist's Sabbahtische Seelenlust (Lüneburg, 1651). The book is arranged with hymns for the Sundays of the Christian year, and this one is set for the first Sunday in Advent ('Arise, arise...'). It had twelve 8-line stanzas, with the title 'Uber das Evangelium am Ersten Advents Sontage/ Welches beschrieben wird vom heiligen Evangelisten Mattheuss / in seinem Evangelien Buche am 21 Kappitel: Da Sie nun nahe bei Jerusalem...

Bernadette Farrell

FARRELL, Bernadette. b. Altofts, West Yorkshire, 1957. Farrell was educated at King's College London and at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. She quickly made her mark as one of the founder members of the St Thomas More Group*. She has worked as diocesan music advisor for Southwark and Westminster and as a workshop presenter both in the UK and in the USA. Her ministry flows in to social action and reflects her strong commitment to justice and peace. In addition to her work with the St...

C. Eric Lincoln

LINCOLN, Charles Eric. b. Athens, Alabama, 23 June 1924; d. Durham, North Carolina, 5 June 2000. Lincoln was educated at Le Moyne College, Syracuse, New York (AB 1947); Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee (MA 1954), the University of Chicago (BD 1956), and Boston University (MEd, PhD 1960). Initially he taught at various schools and universities: Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia (1954-64), Union Theological Seminary, New York (1966-73), and Fisk University (1973-76). He is best known for his...

Cleland B. McAfee

McAFEE, Cleland Boyd. b. Ashley, Missouri, 25 September 1866; d. Jaffrey, New Hampshire, 4 February 1944. Educated at Park College in Parkville, Missouri (founded in 1875 by his father) (BA, 1884; MA, 1888) and Union Theological Seminary in New York City (dipl. 1888), Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri (PhD, 1892). McAfee returned to Park College, served the campus church as Presbyterian preacher and led its choir while he taught philosophy there (1888-1901). Later, he was pastor of First...

Children of Jerusalem

Children of Jerusalem.  John Henley* (1800-1842).  This Palm Sunday hymn for children has appeared in many forms. The text that is found in the Memorials compiled by his widow is presumably the one that Henley approved before his untimely death. It was printed as follows:  “HOSANNA! BLESSED IS HE THAT COMETH IN THE NAME OF THE LORD! HOSANNA IN THE HIGHEST!” 1.Children of JerusalemSang the praise of Jesu's name;Children, too, of modern daysJoin to sing the Saviour's praise. CHORUS: - Hark!...

Come and join the celebration

Come and join the celebration. Valerie Collison* (1933- )  According to the Companion to HP (1988), p. 89, this cheerful song first appeared in Carols for Children (1972), but we have been unable to verify this. It was published in the Baptist supplement Praise for Today (1974), and in Songs of Worship (ScriptureUnion, 1980) before making its way into mainstream books such as HP, ICH5 and Complete Mission Praise (both 2000), and the Scottish CH4, followed by the Methodist book, Singing the...

Chris Tomlin

TOMLIN, Christopher (Chris). b. Grand Saline, Texas, 4 May 1972. Tomlin is a performer, worship leader and songwriter, well-known in the USA for his association with the Passion Conferences, and internationally for his contributions to contemporary Christian music. He was educated at Tyler Junior College, Texas, and Texas A&M University. He is a multiple-award winner in the Gospel Music Association's Dove Awards. He has released ten albums, and has collaborated frequently with other...

David Iliff

ILIFF, David. b. Margate, Kent, 19 March 1939. Educated at King Henry VIII Grammar School, Coventry and the University of London. He was Director of Music at Watford Grammar School (1961-83) and at the British School in Brussels, (1983-2001). He was also Director of Music at the large suburban Anglican Church of Emmanuel, Northwood, Middlesex (1961-81) and at the Pro-Cathedral in Brussels from 1996 onwards. He was a founder member of Jubilate Hymns* in 1980, becoming a Director in 1997. He...

Don Fishel

FISHEL, Donald Emry. b. Hart, Michigan, 1 November 1950. Fishel, a flautist, attended the University of Michigan, studying under Nelson Hauenstein and Michael Stoune (BM, 1972). Brought up a Methodist, he turned to Roman Catholicism in 1969, and worked for the charismatic Roman Catholic 'Word of God Community' in Ann Arbor, Michigan, as publications editor of their Servant Music and as director of the parish orchestra, until 1981. He was principal flautist with Dexter Community Orchestra and...

Edwin Hatch

HATCH, Edwin. b. Derby, 4 September 1835; d. Oxford, 10 November 1889. Born into a nonconformist family, he was educated at King Edward's School, Birmingham and Pembroke College, Oxford (BA 1857). He joined the Church of England in 1853 and took Holy Orders (deacon 1858, priest 1859). After a brief time working in an east-end parish of London he was appointed professor of Classics at Trinity College, Toronto (1859-62). He then served as rector of the high school in Quebec City (1862-67), before...

Es geht daher des Tages Schein

Es geht daher des Tages Schein. Michael Weisse* (ca. 1480-1534). This morning hymn was first printed in Ein new Geseng buchlein (Jungbunzlau, 1531). It is the first of three 'Geseng auf die tagezeiten' ('Hymns for times of day'; Wackernagel, Das Deutsche Kirchenlied III. 318). This is the first of three hymns, of which 'Der Tag bricht an und zeiget sich'* was the second. It had seven 4-line stanzas. It is found in EG in six stanzas (EG 439), with slight alterations, omitting stanza...

From all Thy saints in warfare

From all thy saints in warfare. Horatio Bolton Nelson* (1823-1913). Published in Nelson's Hymns for Saints' Days, and other Hymns, by a Layman (1864). It was modelled on J.S.B. Monsell*'s 'Ye saints! In blest communion'. It consisted of a general opening, individual verses for the feasts of particular saints and a general ending. A revised version, with additional verses contributed by friends, was published in The Sarum Hymnal (1868). It provided for seventeen festivals. The hymn was included...

George Bradford Caird

CAIRD, George Bradford. b. Wandsworth, London, 19 July 1917; d. near Oxford, 21 April 1984. He was educated at King Edward's School, Birmingham (1929-36) and Peterhouse, Cambridge (1936-39). He then trained for the Congregational ministry at Mansfield College, Oxford (1939-43). While a student there in 1941, he wrote the hymn 'Almighty Father, who for us thy Son didst give'*. He was ordained to Highgate Congregational Church, London, in 1943; then moved to Canada to become Professor of Old...

George Hugh Bourne

BOURNE, George Hugh. b. St Paul's Cray, Kent, 8 November 1840; d. Salisbury, 1 December 1925. Born the son of a clergyman, he was educated at Eton and Corpus Christi College, Oxford (BA 1863; BCL 1866, DCL 1871). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1863, priest 1864), serving a curacy at Sandford-on Thames before becoming headmaster of St Andrew's College, Chardstock (1866-74). The College moved to Salisbury as St Edmund's College in 1874, and Bourne remained its headmaster (1874-85). For the school...

George MacDonald

MacDONALD, George. b. Huntly, Aberdeenshire, 10 December 1824; d. Ashstead, Surrey, 18 September 1905. Educated at King's College, Aberdeen (MA 1845), MacDonald moved to London where he was briefly a student at Highbury Theological College (1848- ). Although he did not complete the course, he was ordained at Arundel Congregational Church in 1950. He resigned in 1853, and moved to Manchester, where he became a writer, publishing a dramatic poem, Within and Without (1855), Poems (1857), Hymns and...

George William Conder

CONDER, George William. b. Hitchin, Hertforshire, 30 November 1821; d. Forest Hill, London, 8 November 1874. He was educated at Hitchin Grammar School. He then went to London to make a career in business, becoming a member of King's Weigh House Chapel under the ministry of Thomas Binney*. Binney encouraged him to enter the Congregational Church ministry, and he trained at Highbury College before serving at High Wycombe (1845-47), Ryde, Isle of Wight (1847-49), and Belgrave Chapel, Leeds...

George William Kitchin

KITCHIN, George William. b. Naughton, Suffolk, 7 December 1827; d. Durham, 13 October 1912. Born the son of a clergyman, he was educated at a school in Ipswich and at King's College School, London, followed by Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1850, MA 1853). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1852, priest 1859), becoming Censor of Christ Church (1863-68), and then Censor of Non-Collegiate Students at Oxford. During this period he also taught history and was active in the work of the Oxford University Press....

Glory be to God the Father

Glory be to God the Father. Horatius Bonar* (1808-1889). Written for the hymnbook of the English Presbyterian Church, Psalms and Hymns for Divine Worship (1867), although Bonar had also printed it in his Hymns of Faith and Hope, Third Series (1866). It was entitled 'Praise': Glory be to God the Father,  Glory be to God the Son,Glory be to God the Spirit, -  Great Jehovah, Three in One!    Glory, glory  While unending ages run! It had four stanzas, beginning Glory be to Him who loved...

Gregory of Nazianzen

GREGORY of Nazianzen. b. Nazianzen, ca. 329; d. Nazianzen, 25 January 389. His father was bishop of Nazianzen, and Gregory was born on the family estate. He studied at Caesarea, Alexandria, and Athens, where he studied rhetoric in the 350s. He became a monk, but returned home, where he was ordained by his father in 362. For the next decade, he assisted his father. In 372 a new administrative division of Cappadocia led to the establishment of a new see at Sasima. Against his will, Gregory's...

Geneviève Mary Irons

IRONS, Geneviève Mary. b. Brompton, London, 28 December 1855; d. Eastbourne, Sussex,  13 December 1928. She was the daughter of William Josiah Irons*. She contributed to the Sunday Magazine from 1876 onwards. She became a Roman Catholic (the Latin title of her manual for Holy Communion, Corpus Christi, 1884, suggests that she was a convert by that time).  She translated The Divine Consoler: little visits to the most holy Sacrament, by J.M. Angéli, of the Lazarist Fathers (1900), and published a...

Hark, my soul, how everything

Hark, my soul, how everything. John Austin* (1613-1669). From Austin's Devotions in the Antient Way of Offices (1668), where it is the hymn for Lauds on Monday, with the first line as 'every Thing'. It found its way, via George Hickes's Reformed Devotions, into John Wesley*'s first hymn book, the Collection of Psalms and Hymns (Charlestown, 1737), where Wesley altered the metre from 7.7.7.7. to 8.8.8.8., probably for the sake of a tune, thus: Hark, my dull Soul, how every Thing Strives to...

Henry Cary Shuttleworth

SHUTTLEWORTH, Henry Cary. b. Egloshayle, near Bodmin, Cornwall, 20 October 1850; d. Westminster, London, 24 October 1900. He was educated at Forest School, Walthamstow, London, and St Mary Hall (part of Oriel College) and Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1871, MA 1874). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1874, priest 1876), and was curate of St Barnabas, Oxford and chaplain of Christ Church (1874-76); minor canon of St Paul's Cathedral (1876-84) and rector of St Nicholas Cole Abbey, London (1883- ). He was...

Holy Spirit, truth divine

Holy Spirit, truth divine. Samuel Longfellow* (1819-1892). First published in Hymns of the Spirit (1864), edited by Longfellow and Samuel Johnson*, where it had the title 'Prayer for Inspiration'. It had six stanzas, setting out the virtues associated with the Holy Spirit, beginning with 'Truth divine' and continuing with 'Love divine', 'Power divine', 'Right divine', Peace divine' and 'Joy divine'. Many modern books omit one or more of these stanzas, and there have been many different...

Henry W. Greatorex

GREATOREX, Henry Wellington.  b. Burton-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England, 24 December 1813; d. Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 10 September 1858.  Greatorex is remembered as a composer of hymn tunes, primarily those first published in his book, A Collection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes… (see below). According to Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography and many subsequent accounts, Greatorex was born in 1816.  However, the notice of his death (of yellow fever) in the Charleston Daily...

Jessie Seymour Irvine

IRVINE, Jessie Seymour. b. Dunottar, Kincardineshire, 26 July 1836, d. Aberdeen, 2 September 1887. She was the daughter of Alexander Irvine, Minister of Crimond, Aberdeenshire. After an apparently uneventful life, she was buried in St Machar's Cathedral, Aberdeen. She was possibly the composer of the tune CRIMOND, found in the Scottish Psalter (1929) and made famous in the early days of broadcasting by Sir Hugh Roberton and the Glasgow Orpheus Choir as a setting for the metrical version of...

John Alcock

ALCOCK, John. b. London, 11 Apr 1715; d. Lichfield, Staffordshire, 23 Feb 1806. Alcock trained as a chorister of the Chapel Royal under Charles King. He was also a student of the great organist John Stanley*. He was organist of parish churches in Plymouth (1737-42) and Reading (1742-50), and then of Lichfield Cathedral (1750–60). He then returned to parochial work in Midland towns, becoming organist of Sutton Coldfield (1761–86) and Tamworth (1766–90). He received the Oxford degrees of...

Lord, of thy mercy hear our cry

Lord, of Thy mercy hear our cry.  Emma Toke* (1812-1878). This prayer for righteousness in the nation was first published in the SPCK Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship (1852), edited by Thomas Vincent Fosbery*. It was not included in its successor, Church Hymns (1871), but remained in use until recent times in Ireland, being found in ICH3 (1919) and ICH4 (1960). Lord, of Thy mercy hear our cry  For this long favour'd land;That now, as in the days gone by,  Her strength may be Thy...

Murray John Kroetsch

KROETSCH, Murray John. b. Kitchener, Ontario, Canada, 7 April 1952. He was educated at St. Jerome's University College, University of Waterloo (BA in Religious Studies, 1974) and King's College, University of Western Ontario (MDiv, 1978); University of Notre Dame, Indiana (MA in Liturgical Studies, 1985); and postgraduate studies at Lateran University, Rome (2002-03). Murray Kroetsch was ordained a priest for Hamilton Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Canada on 29 April 1978; and was...

Maggi Dawn

DAWN, Maggi Eleanor. b. 1959. Maggi Dawn is a British musician, author, theologian, and Church of England priest. Prior to ordination, she worked as a singer-songwriter. She remains active as a guitarist and singer. She held chaplaincies at King's College and Robinson College, Cambridge University; since 2011 she has been Associate Dean for Marquand Chapel and Associate Professor of Theology and Literature at Yale University. She has published widely on topics including pilgrimage, women and...

Nicholas Brady

BRADY, Nicholas. b. Bandon, Cork, Ireland, 28 October 1659; d. Richmond, Surrey, 20 May 1726. He was educated at Cork, and at Westminster School, London. He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, but was sent down, for reasons that are unknown. He returned to Ireland and entered Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1685, MA 1686). He was ordained in 1687, becoming a prebendary of Cork Cathedral and the holder of several poor Irish livings. Early in the reign of William III he came to London, where he...

O spread the tidings 'round, where ever man is found

O spread the tidings 'round, where ever man is found. Francis Bottome* (1823-1894). According to Donald P. Hustad* (1978, p. 77) this hymn was first published in the 1890 edition of Precious Hymns for Times of Refreshing and Revival (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), selected by Thomas Harrison (nda), musical editors, John R. Sweney* and William J. Kirkpatrick*. It was published with its tune, COMFORTER, by Kirkpatrick, referring to the refrain:   The Comforter has come! The Comforter has come!  ...

Phineas Fletcher

FLETCHER, Phineas. b. Cranbriook, Kent, April 1582 (baptized 8 April); d. Hilgay, Norfolk, between 1 and 13 December 1650. He was educated at Eton and King's College, Cambridge (BA 1604, MA 1608), and ordained priest in 1611. He seems to have had some hope of fame and royal favour in these years, but they were disappointed. He served as chaplain to his patron, Sir Henry Willoughby, at Risley, Derbyshire, until 1621, when Willoughby presented him with the living of Hilgay, Norfolk, where he...

Praise!

Praise! (2000). A result of collaboration between FIEC (the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches), and the Grace Baptists, this hymn-book was published in 2000. Chaired by Brian Edwards, an Editorial Board of twelve co-ordinated the work of several smaller groups in selecting its 999 items. The book broke new ground in two main directions; it was the first major work from this constituency to face the issue of archaic language, eliminating what were regarded as obsolete pronouns and...

Siegfried August Mahlmann

MAHLMANN, Siegfried August. b. Leipzig, 13 May 1771; d. Leipzig, 16 December 1826. He was educated at the University of Leipzig. After a period as a private tutor, he became a bookseller and writer, later editing a journal, Zeitung für die elegante Welt (1806-16), and the newspaper Leipziger Zeitung (1810-18). He wrote a novel, Albano der Lautenspieler (1802) and a play, Der travestirte Doktor Faust (Berlin, 1806). His poems were published in 1825, and in further editions during the 19th...

Stuart Townend

TOWNEND, Stuart. b. Edinburgh, 1 June 1963. He was educated at Sowerby Bridge High School, near Halifax, West Yorkshire, then at the University of Sussex, Brighton (1981-1985), where he gained an honours degree in American Studies (Literature). Remaining in Brighton, after a year of training in evangelism at the Clarendon Church (now Church of Christ the King), he joined the staff at Kingsway Music, Eastbourne, initially as an in-house arranger and editor, and later as Head of Music, editing...

The Lord's my shepherd, I'll not want

The Lord's my shepherd, I'll not want. Scottish Psalter (1650). This paraphrase of Psalm 23 is the most famous of Scottish metrical psalms, although its fame outside Scotland is comparatively recent. The text is that of the Scottish Psalter* of 1650, sometimes printed with the slight emendation of 'no ill' for the original 'none ill' (verse 3 line 2). Psalm 23 is a psalm that is greatly loved for its beauty and its power to comfort, and it is not surprising that this version is now frequently...

The north wind is tossing the leaves

The north wind is tossing the leaves. John Harry Rupert Angior Wheeler* (1901-84). John Wheeler was born in the small town of Colac in the state of Victoria, Australia, and there is a local anecdote that the text was written as the result of a very hot and windy day in Colac. Leaves from the plane trees lining the streets were blowing round the poet's feet and those of his friend the composer William James*, and both men were attempting to keep the dust out of their eyes. Wheeler reportedly...

To God with heart and cheerful voice

To God with heart and cheerful voice. George Wither* (1588-1667). This hymn appeared in Hymnes and Songs of the Church (1623), for Ascension Day, and, slightly altered, in Haleluiah, or Britans second Remembrancer (1641), where it is hymn 37 in the section, 'Hymns Temporary'. It was included in SofP in the 1623 text, omitting stanza 2: The human nature, which of late Beneath the angels was, Now raisèd from that meaner state, Above them hath a place. And at man's feet all creatures...

Unto us a boy is born

Unto us a boy is born. Latin/German carol, translated by Percy Dearmer* (1867-1936). The Latin text appears in a 15th-century manuscript from Trier, and in several other manuscripts of that period in Germany. It began 'Puer nobis nascitur'*, from a Moosburg Gradual dated 1355-60, and there is also a German text beginning 'Uns ist geborn ein Kindelein'. A good translation was made by George Ratcliffe Woodward* for The Cowley Carol Book (1902) beginning 'Unto us is born a Son,/ King of Quires...

What child is this, who laid to rest

What child is this, who laid to rest. William Chatterton Dix* (1837-1898). This carol was included in the influential collection Christmas Carols New and Old (1871), compiled by H.R. Bramley* and John Stainer*. The statement often made that it was originally part of a longer poem entitled 'The manger throne' is incorrect; 'The manger throne' is an alternative title for another carol by Dix, 'Like silver lamps in a distant shrine'. 'What child is this' is sung to the well-known 16th-century...

Whosoever heareth, shout, shout the sound

Whosoever heareth, shout, shout the sound. Philip P. Bliss* (1838-1876). Written during the winter of 1869-70, during a series of evangelistic meetings in Chicago conducted by an English travelling preacher, Henry Moorhouse. It was published in The Prize, a collection of songs, hymns, chants, anthems and concert pieces, for the Sunday school (Cincinnati, 1870) edited by George F. Root*. According to Ira D. Sankey*, when singing it Bliss put special emphasis on the word 'whosoever' (Sankey,...

William Sterndale Bennett

BENNETT, (Sir) William Sterndale. b. Sheffield, 13 April 1816; d. London, 1 February 1875. He was the son of Robert Bennett (1788-1819), organist of Sheffield Parish Church from 1811. After his father's death, Bennett was brought up by his paternal grandparents in Cambridge, where his grandfather, John Bennett (1754-1837) was a bass lay clerk in the choir which served the colleges of King's, St John's and Trinity. At the age of seven, Bennett became a chorister in King's College Chapel and from...

What sweeter music can we bring

What sweeter music can we bring. Robert Herrick (1591-1674).  From Herrick's His Noble Numbers: or, His Pious Pieces, Wherein (amongst other things) he Sings the Birth of his Christ: and Sighes for his Saviours Suffering on the Crosse (1647). It was entitled 'A Christmas-Carroll, sung to the King in the presence at White-Hall', which suggests a date of composition before 1641 (the English Civil War began in 1642). The text in 1647 is divided into 'Chor.', followed by 'the Song', in irregular...

Frederick Whitfield

WHITFIELD, Frederick. b. Threapwood, near Whitchurch, Shropshire, 7 January 1829; d. Lower Norwood, Surrey, 13 September 1904. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (1856-59, BA 1859). It is not clear why he went to TCD so late: his son spoke of 'quiet uneventful years, in which God was doubtless preparing His servant for his future labours' (Whitfield, 1905, p. 5). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1859, priest, 1860). He was successively curate of Otley,Yorkshire (1859-61), and vicar of...

Johann Kaspar Lavater

LAVATER, Johann Kaspar. b. Zürich, Switzerland, 15 November 1741; d. Zürich, 2 January 1801. The son of a doctor, he was educated in his native city in the Academic Gymnasium and the Theological Faculty of the University (as a young man he was a close friend of Heinrich Füssli, who came to England and became famous as the painter Henry Fuseli). Lavater was ordained in 1762, taking up a position as diaconus of the Orphanage Church in 1769 and becoming pastor in 1775. In 1778 he became diaconus...

Sigmund von Birken

BIRKEN, Sigmund von. b. Wildstein, Bohemia (now Skalná, Czech Republic), 5 May 1626; d. 1681 (buried 16 June). His Protestant family was forced to leave Wildstein in 1629 during the re-Catholicising of Bohemia following the Battle of the White Mountain (1620). The family fled to Nürnberg, where Birken was at school before attending the University of Jena for two years (1643-45). As a young man he came to know the Nürnberg theologian Johann Michael Dilherr, with consequences for his later life;...

What is our calling's glorious hope

What is our calling's glorious hope. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). This hymn is formed from  the last six stanzas (9-14) of a hymn beginning 'Jesu, Redeemer of Mankind', first published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742). It was preceded by a quotation from Titus 2: 14: 'Who gave Himself for us, that He might redeem us from ALL Iniquity.' It began with a denunciation of 'sinners of a carnal mind': Jesu, Redeemer of Mankind,   How little art Thou known By Sinners of a Carnal Mind   Who claim Thee...

Carol Owens

OWENS, Carol. b. El Reno, Oklahoma, 30 October 1931. She was educated at San Jose State College in California. Her husband Jimmy* (they married in 1954) was a jazz band arranger who directed music in several churches in southern California. Beginning in the 'Jesus Movement' (see Christian popular music, USA*), the Owens were active in writing contemporary Christian musicals, performing and recording in various places in California, and doing musical missions for the Church of the Way in Los...

Duncan McNeil

McNEIL (sometimes McNeill), Duncan. b. Glasgow, 15 February 1877; d. Glasgow, 28 January 1933. McNeil was a travelling Scottish evangelist, based in Glasgow. He continued to live there, apart from a visit to the USA in 1927-30, where he was associated with Kimball Avenue United Evangelical Church, Chicago (1928-30). McNeil published Duncan McNeil's Hymn Book (London and Glasgow: Pickering and Inglis, n.d., but dated 1923 in British Library Catalogue). It is said to include 'Song Testimonies'...

Du großer Schmerzensmann

Du großer Schmerzensmann. Adam Thebesius* (1596-1652). This is a Passion-tide hymn ('Thou great man of sorrows') published in Passionale Melicum, Das ist: Außerlesene Geist- und Trostreiche Betrachtungen deß allerschmertzlichsten Leydens und Todes unsers Einigen Heylandes und Erlösers Jesu Christi ('Exceptional spiritual and comfort-full considerations of the all-sorrowful sufferings and death of our only Saviour and Redeemer Jesus Christ'), edited by Martin Janus (Görlitz, 1663). This hymn was...

Erdmann Neumeister

NEUMEISTER, Erdmann. b. Üchteritz, Weissenfels (south of Halle), 12 May 1671; d. Hamburg, 18 August 1756. He was educated at the University of Leipzig (1689-95), where he taught as a lecturer (1695-97). He was assistant pastor and then pastor of Bibra (1697-1704), followed by a post as tutor and court preacher to Duke Johann Georg of Weissenfels (1704-06), and then as court preacher and Lutheran superintendent at Sorau to Count Erdmann II von Promnitz (1706-15). In 1715 he became pastor of St...

Eine Heerde und ein Hirt

Eine Heerde und ein Hirt.  Friedrich Adolf Krummacher* (1767-1845). According to James Mearns* in JJ, p. 634, this is from the Third Edition of Das Christfest (1821). Das Christfest was the second Festbüchlein, the series of publications in which Krummacher interspersed narrative, reflections and hymns. It had six 6-line stanzas, each ending with the line 'Jesus hält, was Er verspricht' ('Jesus holds – or keeps – what he promised'). The 'Heerde' in line 1 is sometimes spelt 'Herde' ('flock')....

Hugh Martin

MARTIN, Hugh. b. Glasgow, 7 April 1890; d. East Grinstead, Sussex, 2 July 1964. He was educated at the University of Glasgow and Glasgow Baptist College. He was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Student Christian Movement in 1914, and worked for the SCM until 1950; he was one of the founders of the SCM Press, and later editor of the Press. An eminent Baptist, he was Moderator of the Free Church Federal Council, 1953-54. He was made a Companion of Honour in 1955. For the SCM Press he wrote...

Lelia Morris

MORRIS, Lelia (née Naylor: Mrs C.H. Morris). b. Pennsville, Ohio, 15 April 1862; d. Auburn, Ohio, 23 July 1929. The family moved to Malta, Ohio, in 1866. After her father's death Lelia, her mother and sister opened a millinery shop across the Muskingum River in McConnelsville. There, in 1881, she married Charles H. Morris. She and her husband participated in camp meetings, including those at Mountain Lake Park, Maryland, and in other musical, evangelistic, and educational activities of the...

Lydia Odell Baxter

BAXTER, Lydia (née Odell) (the History of Ontario County, New York cites her sister's name as Mary Odell). b. Petersburg, New York, 2 September 1809; d. New York, 22 June 1874. Baxter became a Christian after hearing the preaching of Baptist missionary Eben Tucker. She helped to establish the Baptist Church in Petersburg, and upon marriage moved to New York City. There her home was always a local base for various preachers and evangelists, even though she was an invalid for much of her adult...

Pass me not, O gentle Savior

Pass me not, O gentle Savior. Fanny Crosby* (1820-1915). This was the first of Crosby's hymns to become famous. It was written in 1868, following a visit to a worship service in a Manhattan prison, where Crosby heard a prisoner cry out 'Good Lord, do not pass me by' (Reynolds, 1990, p. 226). It was published in William Howard Doane*'s Songs of Devotion for Christian Associations (1870). Carlton R. Young, noting that the hymn is based on the blind beggar's cry to Jesus (Matthew 20: 29-34; Mark...

Savior, thy dying love

Savior, thy dying love. Sylvanus Dryden Phelps* (1816-1895). The first version of this hymn appeared unsigned on page 194 in The Youth's Companion (Boston, December 3, 1863) with the title 'Something for Thee'. It was completely rewritten by Phelps, and appeared in its present form in The Poet's Song for the heart and the home (New York, 1867) p. 384. Robert Lowry* composed the setting, later named SOMETHING FOR JESUS, and included it in Pure Gold, For The Sunday School (New York, 1871) with...

Tommy Coomes

COOMES, Tommy. b. Long Beach, California, 19 May 1946. Singer/songwriter, producer, worship leader and music executive, Coomes played a key role in 'Jesus Music' in the 1960s and 1970s and development of worship music repertoire for the church in the late 20th century. Raised in Lakewood, California, he played trumpet and guitar in high school, studied music at California State University, Long Beach, and enlisted in the US Army. A year after leaving the army in 1969 he met a nucleus of hippie...

Ask ye what great thing I know

Ask ye what great thing I know.  Johann Christoph Schwedler* (1672-1730), translated by Benjamin Hall Kennedy* (1804-1889). Schwedler's hymn, beginning 'Wollt ihr wissen was mein Preis?', has the response at the end of each stanza, 'Jesu, der Gekreuzigte' ('Jesus the crucified'): Wollt ihr wissen, was mein Preis? Wollt ihr wissen, was ich weiß? Wollt ihr sehn mein Eigentum? Wollt ihr hören, was mein Ruhm?   Jesus, der Gekreuzigte,   Jesus, der Gekreuzigte. The hymn was published after his...

Because he lives

Because He lives. Gloria Gaither* (1942- ) and William J (Bill) Gaither* (1936- ).  This song is based on John 14:19c, 'because I live, you also will live,' a theme that is effectively supported by a soaring melody in the refrain. After the opening reference to the Incarnation ('God sent his son, hey called him Jesus'), the first stanza turns to to the empty grave on Easter Day and its significance. Stanza two is about hope, even in uncertain days, because of the singular significance of the...

Elvina Mable Hall

HALL, Elvina Mable (née Reynolds); JJ prints her second name thus; HymnQuest prints it as 'Mabel'. b. Alexandria, Virginia, 4 June 1820; d. Ocean Grove, New Jersey, 18 July 1889. She was a member of the Monument Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Baltimore. She married Richard Hall; after his death she married the Revd Thomas Myers, of the Baltimore Conference of the Methodist Church. She is remembered for one hymn, 'I hear the Savior say'*. This is frequently known and referred to as 'Jesus...

Humble souls, who seek salvation

Humble souls who seek salvation. John Fawcett* (1740-1817). According to JJ, this appeared in Hymns on Believers' Baptism (Birmingham, 1773), edited by John Fellows. In Fawcett's Hymns: adapted to the circumstances of Public Worship and Private Devotion (Leeds, 1782) it had the heading 'Invitation to follow the Lamb. Matt. iii. 15.' It had three stanzas: Humble souls, who seek salvation,   Thro' the Lamb's redeeming blood, Hear the voice of revelation,   Tread the path that Jesus trod. Flee...

I stand all bewildered with wonder

I stand all bewildered with wonder. Wilbur F. Crafts* (1850-1922). Written at some time before 1873, when (according to hymnary.org.) it appeared in Winnowed Hymns: a Collection of Sacred Songs, especially adapted for revivals, prayer, and camp meetings. Crafts was ordained as a Methodist minister in 1872 (he later became a Congregationalist, and then a Presbyterian), so this is the work of a youthful enthusiast. It had four stanzas and a refrain:   I stand all bewildered with wonder,    And...

Katharina Amalia Dorothea von Schlegel

SCHLEGEL, Katharina Amalia Dorothea von. b. 22 October 1697; d, place and date unknown. Her name suggests that she came from an aristocratic family, and she is known to have been connected with a small ducal court at Köthen, north of Halle; but little is known of her life. She may have become a Lutheran nun. She is known as the author of 'Stille, mein Wille; dein Jesus hilft siegen', published in a collection entitled Neue Sammlung geistlicher Lieder ('A new collection of spiritual songs')...

Let us be bread (I am the bread of life, broken for all)

Let us be bread (I am the bread of life, broken for all). Tom Porter* (1958– ). This song was written in 1987 for the author/composer's wedding. It was initially published as an anthem with GIA Publications, Inc.* (Chicago, 1990), this song first appeared in congregational form in Gather Comprehensive (Chicago, 1994). 'Let us be bread' reflects post-Vatican II liturgical theology and practice. This refrain style liturgical song weaves together themes of Eucharist, Paschal Mystery and mission....

My Lord, you wore no royal crown

My Lord, you wore no royal crown. Christopher Martin Idle* (1938- ). Written in November 1978 when the author was rector of Limehouse, after reading Hans Küng's On Being a Christian. It follows Küng in seeing Jesus Christ as transcending leadership models, and ends with a personal prayer. It is one of author's own favourites: he chose it for the events to mark the publication of HFTC in 1982, set to the arrangement in triple time of the tune by Michael Praetorius*, PUER NOBIS NASCITUR (cf....

Symphorianus Pollio

POLLIO, Symphorianus. b. Strasbourg, date unknown, ca. 1480; d. date and place unknown. In some contemporary documents he is known as 'Symphorianus Althiesser', and he was called by C.H. Herford (1886, p. 36) 'Meister Ziprian'. He was a priest at St Stephen's Church, Strasbourg, and then at St Martin's: at one time he was the preacher at the church of Ste Aurélie, where he followed the great Martin Bucer*. He was also interim preacher at the Cathedral. He married in 1524, but continued in...

Snake handling songs

Snake handling songs Snake handling communities are independent offshoots of the Pentecostal Holiness churches in parts of the USA. They are non-denominational, holding that denominations are corrupt. During worship services the participants handle snakes or drink poison, sometimes with fatal consequences. They justify the practice with reference to Mark 16: 17-18: 'And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; They...

When fear and grief had barred the door

When fear and grief had barred the door. Basil Ernest Bridge* (1927-2021). Written in April 1983, and first printed in Stainer & Bell's series Hymns and Congregational Songs (Vol 1 no 1, 1988). It was subsequently included in BPW. The words are based on John 20:19-23. The final line of the penultimate verse, 'Love's freedom know', refers to Jesus's charge to his disciples to offer forgiveness; the same Greek word can mean 'forgive' and 'release'. In verse two, 'what' has occasionally been...

Indonesian hymnody

Introduction Indonesia is a large archipelago of more than 10,000 islands, extending from east to west as far as the distance from Moscow to the west coast of Ireland and covering three time zones. Hundreds of languages and cultures are united in the present-day Republic of Indonesia, proclaimed in 1945 after a centuries-long history of trade relations (with Arab, Indian, Chinese, Portuguese and English merchants), domination and colonisation (since the 17th century by the Dutch East India...

Latin American hymnody, USA

  Latin American hymnody A new Christian hymnology has risen in Latin America and in many communities in the US, among Roman Catholics and Protestants alike.  It has roots in Latin folk and popular music, and most of the time reflects the social realities of the southern continent, owing much to the secular movement called the 'newsong.' This new song is rooted in Latin folk and popular music of the 20th century which express the people's happiness (Raquel Gutiérrez-Achón*, in González, 1996,...

Russian hymnody

See also 'Byzantine hymnody'*, 'Byzantine rite'*, 'Greek hymnody'*, 'Rite of Constantinople'*, 'Rite of Jerusalem'*, 'Greek hymns, archaeology'*. Historical background Kievan Rus' was the result of the coming together of the eastern Slavic tribes in the 9th century, under Count Oleg (879-912). Christianity had existed in Kiev at least from the mid-10th century (there is evidence of a community with a church at the time of Count Igor, where in 945 the Count's troops made a contract with the...

John Mason Neale

NEALE, John Mason. b. London, 24 January 1818; d. East Grinstead, Sussex, 6 August 1866. The son of a Church of England clergyman, he was educated privately in Shepperton by the Revd William Russell, then at schools in Blackheath; Sherborne, Dorset; and Farnham, Surrey. He won a scholarship to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1836, and was the best classicist of his year; but weakness in mathematics meant he only gained a pass degree in 1840. Neale entered Cambridge as an Evangelical, but emerged...

A few more years shall roll

A few more years shall roll. Horatius Bonar* (1808-1889). This was one of Bonar's earliest hymns, written when he was minister of North Parish Church, Kelso. It was printed as a leaflet and sung at Kelso on New Year's Day, 1843. It was published in Bonar's Songs of the Wilderness, No 2 (1844). It had six 8-line verses. A five-verse text, omitting Bonar's verse 5, was printed in the Appendix (1868) to the First Edition of A&M, and that remained the standard A&M version until the hymn...

Allen William Chatfield

CHATFIELD, Allen William. b. Chatteris, Cambridgeshire, 2 October 1808; d. Much Marcle, Gloucestershire, 10 January 1896. He was educated at Charterhouse and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1831, MA 1836). He took Holy Orders (deacon 1832, priest 1833), and was vicar of Stotfold, Bedfordshire (1833-47) and of Much Marcle with Yatton, Gloucestershire (Diocese of Hereford) (1847-96). He followed John Mason Neale* in his interest in Greek hymnody: he was a remarkable translator from (and into)...

Basil Bridge

BRIDGE, Basil Ernest. b. Norwich, 5 August 1927; d. Norwich, 11 September 2021. He was educated at the City of Norwich School and Fitzwilliam House, Cambridge (BA, 1948). He trained for the Congregational ministry at Cheshunt College, and was ordained in 1951. He served in Congregational (after 1972 United Reformed Church) churches at Knowle, Warwickshire (1951-55), Leicester (1955-74), Stamford and Bourne, Lincolnshire (1976-89), and Harrold, Bedforshire (1989-94). He has written over 30 texts...

Can I forget bright Eden's grace

Can I forget bright Eden's grace. William Williams* (1717-91), translated by Herbert Arthur Hodges* (1905-76). This translation of Williams's 'Yn Eden, cofiaf hynny byth' was first printed for the Hymn Society's 'Act of Praise' at its conference in Cardiff in 1975 with the title 'Eden and Calvary'. As this title suggests, the hymn is a highly charged and compressed account of the Fall and the Redemption. The translator's article on Williams (Bulletin of the Hymn Society, 135, 1976) notes that...

Chris Bowater

BOWATER, Christopher Alan (Chris). b. 1947. Bowater is a British songwriter and pastor. Between 1978 and 2006 he had published some 51 songs through Sovereign Lifestyle Music, Kingsway and Thankyou Music. Many of these have featured in various editions of series such as Mission Praise and Songs of Fellowship, as well as in denominational hymnals. Among his most popular and enduring songs are 'Faithful God' (1985) and 'Jesus shall take the highest honour' (1998). He has also published new...

Dermott Monahan

MONAHAN, (Carl) Dermott. b. Ikkada, South India, 1 January 1906; d. Lambeth, London, 23 May 1957. He was the son of a Wesleyan Methodist missionary, educated at Kingswood School, Bath, the school founded by John Wesley for the sons of ministers. From there he went to Trinity Hall, Cambridge (BA 1927); after a year (1927-28) as a Colonial Administrator in the Gold Coast (now Ghana), he studied at Handsworth College, Birmingham. He served in educational work in India in the Hyderabad District...

Doreen Newport

NEWPORT, Doreen (née McFee). b. Manchester, 24 February 1927; d. Winchester, 25 October 2004. Born in Manchester, she was educated at Somerville College, Oxford and then at the University of Manchester, where she completed a Diploma in Education. Newport, known familiarly as 'Bunty', taught music in Norfolk, Cambridge and Winchester, as well as being active as an accompanist. In 1951 she married a Congregational (later URC) minister, Jack Newport. Her best known hymn is 'Think of a world...

Es wolle uns Gott gnädig sein

Es wolle Gott uns gnädig sein. Martin Luther* (1483-1546). This paraphrase of Psalm 67, 'Deus misereatur', originally 'Es wollt uns Gott…', was published as a broadsheet (a man was arrested in Magdeburg in 1524 for selling it), and in one of Luther's liturgical books on the Mass and Communion, Ein weise christlich Mess zuhaltē (Wittenberg, 1524). It then appeared in Eyn Enchiridion oder Handbuchlein (Erfurt, 1524). It had three 9-line stanzas (Jenny, Luthers geistliche Lieder, no.10, pp....

Elizabeth Codner

CODNER, Elizabeth (née Harris). b. Dartmouth, Devon, 1823; d. Croydon, Surrey, 28 March 1919. She was interested in the mission field from an early age, and two of her early publications were entitled The Missionary Ship (1853) and The Missionary Farewell (1854) relating to the Patagonia Mission (later the South American Missionary Society).  She married Daniel Codner, an Anglican clergyman: he appears in the Clergy Lists for this period, but without a benefice. She was closely involved with...

Elizabeth Parson

PARSON, Elizabeth (née Rooker). b. Tavistock, Devon, 5 June 1812; d. Plymouth, 1873. The daughter of a Congregational minister, she married T. Edgecombe Parson in 1844. According to JJ, p. 882, she held a class for young men and women in the vestry of her father's chapel on Sunday evenings. It was known as the 'willing class' because people came 'willingly'. Her hymns were written for these class meetings, and later published as Willing Class Hymns (n.d.). They were found in collections in the...

Father in heaven

Father in heaven. Daniel Thambyrajah Niles* (1908-1970). This touchingly simple hymn in three stanzas was written for the EACC Hymnal (1963) to fit the tune HALAD by Elena G. Maquiso* . The tune had been composed in 1961 for an offering hymn (HALAD means 'offering') in the Cebuano dialect (see 'Philippine hymnody'). Niles's hymn celebrates Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It was originally in the second person singular ('Father in heaven,/ Grant to Thy children'). It has been altered to the 'you'...

George Duffield

DUFFIELD, George, Jr. b. Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 12 September 1818; d. Bloomfield, New Jersey, 6 July 1888. Duffield was born into a Presbyterian preacher's home. A graduate of Yale College (1837) and of Union Theological Seminary in New York City (1840), he served Presbyterian churches in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Illinois. He was a regent for the University of Michigan for seven years; served as editor of the Presbyterian journal, the Christian Observer; promoted...

Hear thy children, gentlest Mother

Hear thy children, gentlest Mother. Francis Stanfield* (1835-1914).  This was the first of two hymns for children by Stanfield, written in the same four stanzas, and in the same metre. The other was 'Hear thy children, gentle Jesus'*. The present (earlier) hymn was published in his Catholic Hymns (1858, 1860):  Hear thy children, gentlest Mother, Prayerful hearts to thee arise; Hear us while our evening Ave Soars beyond the starry skies.  Darkling shadows fall around us, Stars their silent...

It passeth knowledge, that dear love of Thine

It passeth knowledge, that dear love of Thine. Mary Shekleton* (1827-1883). Written in 1863 and first published in broadsheet form. It was later included in Ira D. Sankey*'s Sacred Songs and Solos No 1 (ca. 1873) to be sung to Sankey's tune IT PASSETH KNOWLEDGE. It is a reflection on Ephesians 3: 17-19, ending 'to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fullness of God'. It had seven verses. It still appears in some hymn books (WOV, HP) in...

I heard an old, old story

I heard an old, old story. Eugene M. Bartlett* (1885-1941). Published in 1939, following a stroke that rendered Bartlett partially paralyzed and unable to perform or travel, this hymn, composed in a gospel-quartet style, was widely performed and recorded and became his best-known work. It is sometimes identified by its refrain as 'O victory in Jesus': O victory in Jesus My Savior forever He sought me and bought me With His redeeming blood He loved me ere I knew Him And all my love is due Him...

I serve a risen Savior

I serve a risen Savior. Alfred Ackley* (1887-1960). Published in Triumphant Service Songs, by the Rodeheaver HallMack Publishing Company in 1934, this modern gospel hymn rapidly became a favorite at evangelistic meetings and campaigns. The music was by Ackley himself. Like many of Ackley's hymns, it is probably better known from its refrain, 'He lives, he lives, Christ Jesus lives today!': He lives, he lives, Christ Jesus lives today!He walks with me and talks with me along life's narrow...

I was sinking deep in sin

I was sinking deep in sin. James Rowe* (1865-1933). This dramatic hymn was written ca. 1912, at the height of the Reconstruction Era urban gospel hymnody movement. It was published by Robert H. Coleman* in one of the many Coleman publications, The Herald (Dallas, 1915). It is a three-verse nautical-imagery hymn, praising Jesus, 'master of the Sea', who saves the sinner from sinking. The refrain is 'Love lifted me!', ending 'When nothing else could help/ Love lifted me!' The tune is called...

James Ashcroft Noble

NOBLE, James Ashcroft. b. Liverpool, 25 June 1844; d. Wandsworth, London, 3 April 1896. Noble became a literary critic and an active man of letters in Victorian England: he wrote essays for The Spectator, produced a book on shorthand, and became the editor of a periodical, The Illustrator. Among his many books were The Pelican Papers: Reminiscences and Remains of a Dweller in the Wilderness (1873), Morality in English Fiction (Liverpool, 1886), The Sonnet in England, & other essays (1893),...

Jean Mauburn

MAUBURN, Jean. b. Brussels, ca. 1460; d. Paris, 1503. According to Frost (1962, p. 561), he studied music at Utrecht, and was an Augustinian canon of various French abbeys (in The Voice of Christian Life in Song, 1858, Elizabeth Rundle Charles* described him as Abbot of Livry). In 1491 Mauburn published Rosetum exercitiorum spiritualium ('Spiritual Exercises for the Confraternity of the Rosary'). According to The Hymnal 1982 Companion, these were spiritual exercises for the laity. From this...

Jesu, we look to thee

Jesu, we look to thee. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), Volume 1, in four 8-line DSM stanzas. A few words were altered and the last verse was omitted when the hymn was included in John Wesley*'s A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780): Thou wilt to us make known Thy Nature and thy Name Us who our Utmost Saviour own From every Touch of Blame, From every Word and Deed, From every Thought unclean, Our...

Johnson Oatman, Jr.

OATMAN, Johnson, Jr. b. Medford, New Jersey, 21 April 1856; d. Norman, Oklahoma, 25 September 1922. Oatman attended Herbert's Academy in Vincentown, New Jersey, and the New Jersey Collegiate Institute in Bordentown. Ordained a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, his pastoral work was limited, owing to his employment in his father's mercantile business, and later as an insurance agent in Mount Holly, New Jersey, until ill health caused his retirement in 1892-93. In the years that...

John Ernest Bode

BODE, John Ernest. b. London, 23 February 1816; d. Castle Camps, Cambridgeshire, 6 October 1874. He was educated at two schools, Eton and Charterhouse, followed by Christ Church, Oxford (BA 1837, MA 1840). He became a Student (a Fellow) of Christ Church (1841-47), and took Holy Orders (deacon 1841, priest 1843). He was vicar of Westwell, Oxfordshire (1847-60), and of Castle Camps, Cambridgeshire (1860-74). He gave the prestigious Bampton Lectures at Oxford in 1855, published under the title The...

Judith Beatrice O'Neill

O'NEILL, Judith Beatrice (née Lyall). b. Melbourne, Australia, 3 June 1930. She was educated at Mildura High School (the family moved to Mildura, in the north of the State of Victoria, in 1940) and the University of Melbourne. She studied in London (1952-53), and taught English Literature at the University of Melbourne (1954-55, and again in 1959-64; from 1955 to 1959 she was in Göttingen and Cambridge, with her postgraduate student husband, whom she married in 1954). In 1964 she returned to...

Jesu, Lord, Redeemer

Jesus, Lord, Redeemer. Patrick Miller Kirkland* (1857-1943).  This moving Easter hymn was first published in the English Presbyterian hymnbook, Church Praise (revised edition, 1907). It is unusual in hymnody because it includes the story of the road to Emmaus and the ten disciples (without Judas and Thomas) in hiding on the first Easter day: Faithful ones, communing,   Towards the close of day, Desolate and weary,   Met Thee in the way... In the upper chamber,   Where the ten, in fear,...

Lord of all, to whom alone

Lord of all, to whom alone. Cyril Argentine Alington* (1872-1955). This hymn appeared in the Eton College Hymn Book (1937), and was entitled 'A Litany' in Alington's verse collection In Shabby Streets (1942). It was subsequently included in BBCHB and many other hymnbooks. It takes the form of a simple petition for forgiveness. The first two verses echo the collect (prayer) for purity in the Holy Communion in the Book of Common Prayer ('Almighty God, unto whom all hearts be open, all desires...

Marjorie Dobson

DOBSON, Marjorie. b. Eldon, County Durham, 6 June 1940. She was educated at Bishop Auckland Girls' Grammar School, after which she worked in the civil service and in local government. She has been a Methodist Local Preacher from the age of 20, and since the early 1970s she has explored the possibilities of contemporary hymnody in making worship as relevant as possible to young people. She began to write hymns in the late 1980s, some of which were published in the periodical Worship Live...

Maud Coote

COOTE, Maud (née Oswell). b. Whittington, Shropshire, 1851; d. Westminster, London, 18 March 1935. Little is known of Maud Oswell's life, except the dates and places above (from Shropshire Baptism Records and HymnQuest) and that she married Mr Coote (she appears as 'Mrs. Coote' in EH, which is misleading, because her hymns must have been written before she was twenty). She was certainly active as a writer and in church work as a young woman, because what little is known of her life is taken by...

Name of all majesty

Name of all majesty. Timothy Dudley-Smith* (1926- ). At Ruan Minor, Cornwall, in August 1979, the author drafted this text from notes made earlier that year during his reading of Walter de la Mare's Collected Poems. These referred mainly to the metrical form of three of them, on one of which 'this text came to be loosely modelled'. Headed simply 'The Lord Jesus Christ', it is a poetic exposition of the phrase 'Jesus is Lord', which 'is said to be the earliest baptismal creed of the church: cf....

One day when heaven was filled with his praises

One day when heaven was filled with his praises. John W. Chapman* (1859-1918). Written ca. 1908, and given to a musician, Charles Howard Marsh (1886-1956), who wrote a tune for it. A publishing dispute meant that it was not published until 1911. It had five stanzas, with a refrain: Living, He loved me; dying, He saved me; Buried, He carried my sins far away; Rising, he justified freely for ever: One day He's coming – O glorious day! The message is that 'one day when sin was as...

O wie freun wir uns der Stunde

O wie freun wir uns der Stunde. Karl Johann Philipp Spitta* (1801-1859). First published in Spitta's Psalter und Harfe. Zweite Sammlung (Leipzig, 1843) in six 8-line stanzas. It was entitled 'Du hast Worte des ewigen Lebens' ('Thou hast the words of eternal life', from John 6: 68). It is delightfully simple in places, as in verse 1b: Lass uns heute nicht vergebens Hörer eines Wortes sein, Schreibe selbst das Wort des Lebens Tief in uns're Herzen ein. Let us not neglect today ...

Priscilla Jane Owens

OWENS, Priscilla Jane. b. Baltimore, Maryland, 21 July 1829; d. Baltimore, 5 December 1907. Owens was educated at the Patapsco Institute, in Howard Country, Maryland, and the Ladies' Collegiate Institute, Baltimore. Owens taught in the public school system for 49 years, and in Union Square Methodist Episcopal Church's Sunday School for even longer. She composed poetry and prose on a wide range of topics, including ballads relating to the Civil War, religious verse, and hymns and Sunday school...

Roger Jones

JONES, Roger. b. Birmingham, 15 May 1948. Educated at the Birmingham School of Music. Jones is a composer of Christian musicals and hymn tunes. He began his career as a school teacher, but moved into full-time Christian Music Ministry in 1984. He directs Christian Music Ministries (CMM), which publishes his music. Many of his early hymn tunes were written for inclusion in the series of Christian musicals he composed, starting in the early 1970s. Many are settings for familiar texts, such as...

Susan Bogert Warner

WARNER, Susan Bogert. b. New York, 11 July 1819; d. 17 March 1885. Born in New York, she was the older sister of Anna Bartlett Warner*. With the failure of her father's real estate speculation in 1837, the family moved to a farmhouse on Constitution Island on the Hudson River, where the sisters made a living by writing. Susan, who was the more successful of the two, wrote under the pseudonym of Elizabeth Wetherell. Her novel, The Wide, Wide World (1851), was a best-seller, admired by Henry...

Thomas O. Chisholm

CHISHOLM, Thomas Obediah. b. Franklin, Kentucky, 29 July 1866; d. Ocean Grove, New Jersey, 29 February 1960. Thomas Chisholm received little formal education beyond elementary school. He served as a teacher at his own rural school from age 16, and then assumed editing duties at his hometown newspaper, The Franklin Favorite, at age 23. Converted under the preaching of Henry Clay Morrison (founder of Asbury College & Seminary), Chisholm became editor and manager of the Pentecostal Herald in...

Walk in the light: so shalt thou know

Walk in the light: so shalt thou know. Bernard Barton* (1784-1849). From Devotional verses founded on, and illustrative of, Select Texts of Scripture (1826), based on 1 John 1:7: 'But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ cleanseth us from all sin.' The hymn had six stanzas. Stanza 2, which is sometimes omitted, is clearly based on the second half of the biblical text: Walk in the light: and sin, abhorred Shall...

Walter John Mathams

MATHAMS, Walter John. b. Bermondsey, London, 30 October 1853; d. Swanage, Dorset, 29 January 1931. He went to sea as a young man, and then took part in the Alaska gold rush. He subsequently decided to train for the Baptist ministry, entering Regent's Park College, London, in 1874. He became a pastor at Preston, Lancashire, but was forced to give up because of ill health. On recovery, he became a pastor at Falkirk (1883-88) and Birmingham (1888-1900). He then joined the Church of Scotland,...

We have heard the joyful sound

We have heard the joyful sound. Priscilla Jane Owens* (1829-1907). Written for a Sunday-school anniversary sometime before 1882, when it was published in Songs of Redeeming Love, compiled by John R. Sweney*, C.C. McCabe, T.C. O'Kane, and William J. Kirkpatrick*. The tune is by Kirkpatrick. The 'joyful sound' is 'Jesus saves, Jesus saves', repeated throughout the hymn. Originally the opening was 'We have heard a joyful sound', altered to the present form in Gospel Hymns No 5 (1887), edited by...

Who is on the Lord's side

Who is on the Lord's side. Frances Ridley Havergal* (1836-1879). Written on 13 October 1877, and published in Havergal's Loyal Responses (1878). It was entitled 'On the Lord's Side' and prefaced with the quotation '“Thine are we, David, and on thy side, thou son of Jesse.” – I Chron. xii.18.' It had five 8-line stanzas, each followed by a 4-line response. Most books print a four-stanza text, omitting the original stanza 2: Not for weight of glory, Not for crown and palm, Enter we the...

All ye that pass by

All ye that pass by. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns on the Great Festivals, and Other Occasions (1746), the book in which Wesley's texts, some unpublished, were set to music by his friend John Frederick Lampe*. This is hymn 4 in the book, entitled 'On the Crucifixion', the first of three hymns with that title. It was then published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1749), with the title 'Invitation to Sinners'. It is based on Lamentations 1: 12: 'Is it nothing to you, all ye...

Benjamin Schmolck

SCHMOLCK, Benjamin. b. Brauchitzdorf, near Liegnitz, Silesia, 21 December 1672; d. Schweidnitz, 12 February 1737. The son of a Lutheran pastor, he was educated at the Gymnasium at Lauban and at the University of Leipzig (1693-97). He was ordained in 1701. In 1702 he was appointed diaconus of the Lutheran Friedenskirche at Schweidnitz. He remained there for the rest of his life, as diaconus, then archdiaconus (1708), and then pastor primarius (1714). Following the wars of religion, Schweidnitz...

C. Herbert Woolston

Woolston, C. Herbert. b. Camden, New Jersey, 7 April 1856;  d. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 20 May 1927.A pastor, gospel song writer, and sleight-of-hand magician, Clarence Herbert Woolston claimed that he had 'addressed many more than 1,000,000 children' (The Philadelphia Inquirer, 1927, p. 4).  The son of Isaiah S. and Sarah B. Woolston, Herbert attended public schools in Camden, New Jersey, and the South Jersey Institute at Bridgeton. He entered the ministry under the influence of evangelist...

How lost was my condition

How lost was my condition. John Newton* (1725-1807).  From Olney Hymns (1779), Book I, 'On select Texts of Scripture'. It was Hymn 62, entitled 'The good Physician'. The text on which is was based is (unusually) not given, but it comes after a hymn on Isaiah 45: 22 and before a hymn in Isaiah 54: 5-11. There is no physician in the intervening chapters, but it is a very general hymn on the power of Jesus to heal the sin-sick soul (cf. Jeremiah 8: 22, Mark 2: 17). It had five stanzas in...

Lina Sandell-Berg

SANDELL-BERG, Lina (née Sandell, Karolina Vilhelmina, sometimes Sandell, Lina). b. 3 October 1832; d. 27 July 1903. Born at Fröderyd, Smaland, Sweden, the daughter of a pastor, she lost both her parents, her father drowning before her eyes in a boating accident. After the death of her parents she lived in a home run by a religious group, and began to write poems, using the initials 'L.S.'. Many of them were set to music by the guitarist Oskar Ahnfelt (1813-1882), the 'spiritual troubadour' of...

This little light of mine

This little light of mine. African American spiritual*, perhaps by Harry Dixon Loes (1892/95- 1965). This has many characteristics of an African American spiritual, and is sometimes designated as such in hymnals. Other authorities assign it to Loes, a composer from Kalamazoo, Michigan, who studied and then taught at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago. He wrote 'Friends all around us are trying to find', with the refrain 'All that I want is in Jesus', and he may have written this hymn....

Worship Songs, Ancient and Modern

Worship Songs, Ancient and Modern was published as a joint venture in 1992, in Britain by the Canterbury Press, Norwich, and in the USA by Hope Publishing Company*, Carol Stream, Illinois. It was something of a surprise: A&M  was 'an organisation identified so positively with the traditional world of hymnody', but it had identified a need to bridge 'the present gap between the classic hymn and the popular chorus' (Introduction). The 100 songs are arranged alphabetically. There are some...

Fanny Crosby

CROSBY, Frances Jane (later van Alstyne). b. Putnam County, New York, 24 March 1820; d. Bridgeport, Connecticut, 12 February 1915. 'Fanny' Crosby was born to a distinguished Puritan family. She was blinded, probably through bad treatment for an eye infection from a man passing himself off as a doctor, when she was six weeks old. Her father died the same year. She was raised as a Presbyterian by her mother and grandmother, and later by a Mrs Hawley. She attended the New York City School for the...

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide. Henry Francis Lyte* (1793-1847). Probably written in 1847, this is one of the world's best known hymns. Based on Luke 24:49, it is particularly associated with funeral services, but has had wide appeal in secular contexts as well. Its origins are somewhat uncertain. It was originally thought that Lyte had written it in his study on the evening before preaching his farewell sermon in the parish of Brixham, Devon, in September 1847; this account is...

Accompaniment

We do not know how hymns were performed in early Christian times. The first clear sign of instrumental accompaniment was the introduction of organs to the liturgy in the 10th century. At first they probably duplicated the chant in unison. Their evident purpose was to hold the singers together and in tune, and to provide continuity, since (when properly blown or powered) the organ does not tire or pause for breath, and can maintain an unchanging dynamic level. These functions are still the...

Christ, who knows all his sheep

Christ, who knows all his sheep. Richard Baxter* (1615-1691). This is from Baxter's poem, 'The Exit', dated 'Decemb. 19.1682' and printed in Additions to the Poetical Fragments of Richard Baxter (1683). It begins 'My Soul go boldly forth,/ Forsake this Sinful Earth', and the theme throughout is the contrast between the joys of heaven and the pain and sorrow of earth. Verse 11, for example reads: O Blessed Company, Where all in Harmony, Jehovah's Praises Sing, Still without...

Come, let us join our friends above

Come let us join our friends above. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Funeral Hymns (1759) in five 8-line stanzas, this hymn has been subjected to considerable textual revision and does not appear in any hymnbook in its full, original form, which can be found in Frank Baker's Representative Verse of Charles Wesley (1962), pp. 131ff. The least drastic amendment follows the example of MHB in retaining most of the original text, omitting only verses 3b and 4a: His militant,...

Creator of the earth and skies

Creator of the earth and skies. Donald Hughes* (1911-1967). First published in six stanzas in Hymns for Church and School (1964), and then, shortened and altered to four stanzas, in the British Methodist supplement, Hymns and Songs (1969). The two missing stanzas were 2 and 5: Like theirs of old, our life is death,   Our light is darkness, till we see The eternal Word made flesh and breath,   The God who walked by Galilee. Stanza 4 was: We have not loved you: far and wide   The wreckage of...

Gott sei Dank durch alle Welt

Gott sei Dank durch alle Welt. Heinrich Held* (1620-1659). First published in Neu-erfundene Geistliche Wasserquelle (Frankfurt/Oder, 1658) edited by Johannes Niedling (1602-1668), with the title 'Von der Zukunfft Christi'. According to JJ, p. 507, it also appeared in an edition of Johann Crüger*'s Praxis Pietatis Melica dated 1659. It had nine 4-line verses, shortened to four (1-4) in the 'Advent' section of EG. The remaining stanzas (5-9) were as follows: The Lutheran Hymnal,...

Henry Lawes

LAWES, Henry. b. Dinton, Wiltshire, 1596 (baptized 5 January); d. London, 21 October 1662. His early career was as teacher of music in the household of the Earl of Bridgewater. In 1626 he was appointed to the Chapel Royal, and in 1631 he became a musician in the King's Musick. At the Restoration of 1660 he was reinstated to these positions, becoming additionally 'Composer in ye Private Musick for Lutes and Voices'. He was famous in his own time, holding concerts at his house which were attended...

Johann Schop

SCHOP, Johann. b. Hamburg, ca. 1590; d. Hamburg, summer 1667. No documents survive pertaining to his youth and school years. In 1614, Schop gained probationary employment as a musician at the court chapel of Duke Friedrich Ulrich in Wolfenbüttel. His varied instrumental expertise on the lute, cornet and trombone, and his excellent violin playing, led to a permanent post there in 1615. Nevertheless, in the same year Schop moved to the court chapel of King Christian IV of Denmark in Copenhagen,...

John Dykes Bower

DYKES BOWER, (Sir) John. b. Gloucester, 13 August 1905, d. 29 May 1981. 'DB' (as he was universally known) was one of four unmarried sons of a Gloucester ophthalmic surgeon who was a keen amateur musician (great-grandson of John Bacchus Dykes*): all four were not only distinguished in their chosen professions but inherited their father's skill in music and interest in architecture. In particular, Stephen Dykes Bower (1908-94) was a talented amateur organist and by profession an ecclesiastical...

John Frederick Lampe

LAMPE, John Frederick. b. perhaps Braunschweig/Brunswick, 1702/3; d. Edinburgh, 25 July 1751. Lampe was a German-born composer and performer, who was described as coming from Brunswick in the records of the University of Helmstedt, where he studied law from 1718 to 1720. He settled in Britain from 1725/6, establishing himself as a harpsichordist and bassoonist, performing under Handel*'s direction, and also as a composer of operatic music. In the mid-1740s, he came into contact with John* and...

John Goss

GOSS, (Sir) John. b. Fareham, Hampshire, 27 December 1800; d. London, 10 May 1880. His father, Joseph Goss, was organist at Fareham. He was a chorister at the Chapel Royal from 1811 under John Stafford Smith (1750–1836), who perhaps inculcated in him a reverence for old music; later he studied composition with Thomas Attwood*. As organist of the new parish church of St Luke, Chelsea (1824–38) Goss brought out a four-volume collection, Parochial Psalmody (1826). He composed one successful opera,...

John Ryland

RYLAND, John. b. Warwick, 29 January 1753; d. Bristol, 25 June 1825. He was the son of a Baptist pastor, John Collett Ryland (1723-1792), a notable figure in 18th-century Baptist circles (he was baptized by Benjamin Beddome* and his funeral sermon was preached by John Rippon*). To distinguish himself from his forceful parent, the son called himself 'John Ryland, Junior'. In 1759 John Collett Ryland moved to Northampton as pastor: he taught his son Hebrew and Greek, and John Ryland Junior is...

Let the whole creation cry

Let the whole creation cry.  Stopford Brooke* (1832-1916). From Brooke's Christian Hymns (1881), the book compiled for his congregation at Bedford Chapel (even though by that time he had left the Church of England). It was published by the Women's Printing Society, a recently-founded enterprise to employ women, which became associated with the early years of the suffragette movement. It was also an example of Brooke's liking for long hymns, for it had ten 4-line stanzas. It was based on Psalm...

Lord of all power and might

Lord of all power and might. Hugh Stowell* (1799-1865).  According to JJ, p. 1097) this was written for the Jubilee of the British and Foreign Bible Society, 7 March 1853, and published after his death in Hymns, by the late Rev. Canon Stowell, M.A. (Manchester, 1868). It was subsequently published in the enlarged edition of Stowell's A Selection of Psalms & Hymns Suited to the Services of the Church of England (Manchester, 1877), edited by his son, Thomas Alfred Stowell (1831-1916). It had...

Michael Saward

SAWARD, Michael John. b. Blackheath, London, 14 May 1932; d. Switzerland, 31 January 2015. Educated at Eltham College, Bristol University and Tyndale Hall, Bristol. From 1949-52 he worked in an office, followed by National Service. Ordained in 1956, he served curacies at Croydon (1956-59) and Edgware (1959-64). He was Warden of Holy Trinity Inter-Church Centre, Liverpool (1964-67); the Church of England's Radio and TV Officer (1967-72); incumbent of Fulham (1972-78), and Ealing (1978-91)...

O Filii et Filiae

O Filii et Filiae. Jean Tisserand* (d. 1494). This hymn on the events of Easter, with an emphasis on the episode of St Thomas, is found in an untitled booklet printed between 1518 and 1536, probably at Paris. It was a 'Salut', a greeting to the Blessed Sacrament on Easter Day. It was entitled 'L'aleluya du jour de Pasques', and in translation it is prefaced by the three-fold 'Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!' There is some suggestion that the triple 'Alleluia' may have been sung between each...

O light of light, by love inclined

O light of light, by love inclined. Laurence Housman* (1865-1959). This is a translation of a Latin hymn of unknown origin, but at least as old as the 10th century, 'O nata Lux de lumine'. This hymn for the Transfiguration was included in EH, to be sung to plainsong (though not the same melody as either of those associated with the Latin text in the manuscripts edited by Bruno Stäblein in Monumenta Monastica Medii Aevi, Kassel, 1956) or to the tune WHITEHALL by Henry Lawes*. The hymn is a...

O Thou Whose all-redeeming might

O Thou Whose all-redeeming might.  Latin, 8th or 9th century, translated by Richard Meux Benson* (1824-1915). This translation of the anonymous Latin hymn 'Iesu Redemptor omnium'* was included in the First Edition of A&M (1861), in the section 'Martyrs, &c.' It was preceded by a quotation from 1 Timothy 3: 1: 'If a man desire the office of a Bishop, he desireth a good work.' In subsequent editions of A&M it is headed 'For a Bishop'. It was slightly altered in A&M (1904), but...

O where are kings and empires now

O where are kings and empires now. Arthur Cleveland Coxe* (1818-1896). The customary form of this hymn is that of four quatrains, selected from Coxe's longer poem, 'Chelsea', a tribute to the General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church, Chelsea, Massachusetts, where he was a divinity student. According to JJ, it first appeared in the Churchman (1839). In ten 8-line stanzas, it was published in Coxe's Christian Ballads (1840). It is a confident poem in which the opening is charmingly...

Robert Bridges

BRIDGES, Robert Seymour. b. Walmer, Kent, 23 October 1844; d. Oxford, 21 April 1930. The Bridges family had been yeomen and gentleman farmers for generations. His father died in 1853, and his mother married the Reverend John Molesworth, vicar of Rochdale, Lancashire, where Bridges spent some of his vacations during his formative years at school and college. He was educated at Eton and Corpus Christi College, Oxford (BA 1867, MA 1874). After Oxford, he travelled in the Middle East (1868) and...

Salisbury Hymn Book, The

The Salisbury Hymn Book (1857). This was published in Salisbury and London, although it may have originated in a hymnbook for the local diocese of the former. It was edited by Horatio Bolton Nelson*. There was no Preface, but a letter addressed to Earl Nelson from the Bishop of Salisbury, Walter Kerr Hamilton, dated November of that year, was printed as follows: 'My dear Lord,/ I very much like the Hymn-book which you have sent me, and I quite approve of your publishing it./ I remain, Yours...

Thomas A. Dorsey

DORSEY, Thomas Andrew. b. Villa Rica, Georgia, 1 July 1899; d. Chicago, 23 January 1993. Born into a Baptist preacher's family that moved to Atlanta when he was five, Dorsey studied music there and came under the influence of local blues pianists. He moved to Chicago in 1915, where he studied at the Chicago College of Composition and Arranging, and played in nightclubs as 'Georgia Tom' or 'Barrelhouse Tom', accompanying blues singers such as Tampa Red, Ma Rainey, and Bessie Smith. Because of...

Thou, whose almighty word

Thou, whose almighty word. John Marriott* (1780-1825). Marriott's hymns were not published during his lifetime. This appeared shortly after his death in the Evangelical Magazine (June 1825) as part of a record of a meeting of the London Missionary Society on 12 May, when it had been quoted by the Revd Thomas Mortimer, Lecturer of St Olave's, Southwark. It then appeared in The Friendly Visitor (July 1825). It had no author's name. It was entitled 'Missionary Hymn'. According to one of...

Thomas Rawson Birks

BIRKS, Thomas Rawson. b. Staveley, Derbyshire, 20 September 1810; d. Cambridge, 21 July 1883. He was the son of a Baptist tenant farmer, educated locally at Chesterfield and then at Mill Hill school, north London, founded in 1807 as a nonconformist Grammar School, where he became a master for a short time. He became a member of the Church of England in 1830, and went on in that year to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he had a distinguished career as an undergraduate (BA 1834), and became a...

The son of consolation

The son of consolation. Maud Coote* (1851-1935). This hymn for St Barnabas' Day was written before 1871, when it was published in Church Hymns (1871, Church Hymns with Tunes, 1874), so it was the work of a young woman. It should really have been attributed to Maud Oswell, her maiden name, but in hymnbooks it is given as above. The name Barnabas means 'son of consolation' (Acts 4: 36). The hymn had five stanzas, printed in EH for St Barnabas' Day (11 June), shortened to three and radically...

William John Blew

BLEW, William John. b. Westminster, London, 13 April 1808; d. Westminster, 27 December 1894. Born at Westminster, London, he was educated at a school at Ealing run by a Dr George Nicholas, where a fellow-pupil was John Henry Newman*. He then went to Wadham College, Oxford (BA 1830, MA 1832) and took Holy Orders (deacon 1832, priest 1834), serving as curate of Nuthurst and Cocking, Sussex (1832-40) and curate of St Anne's, Soho, London (1840-42). In 1842 he became the incumbent at St John's,...

Jewish hymnals and hymnody, USA

This essay examines Jewish hymnals, primarily English language ones, published in the United States and represents to a large extent the Reform tradition and only to a lesser extend the Conservative branch of Judaism. Traditional Jewish hymnody is covered in two articles: Hebrew hymnody* (piyyut) and Jewish Sabbath hymns*. 19th century Although Jewish communities existed in the United States as early as 1654, the early settlers were primarily Portuguese (Sephardic) and hymnody beyond the...

Alfred Tennyson

TENNYSON, Alfred. b. Somersby, Lincolnshire, 6 August 1809; d. Haslemere, Surrey, 6 October 1892. He was the son of the rector of Somersby, educated at Louth Grammar School, and then privately. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1827, leaving in 1831 without taking a degree, but having published Poems, Chiefly Lyrical (1830). At Cambridge he became friendly with the brilliant Arthur Henry Hallam (1811-33), whose sudden death, and the reflections upon it, were the cause of Tennyson's...

B. F. White

WHITE, Benjamin Franklin. b. near Cross Keys, Union County, South Carolina, 20 September 1800; d. Atlanta, Georgia, 5 December 1879.  White was the principal compiler, along with Elisha J. King*, of The Sacred Harp*. Benjamin White was the twelfth child of Robert White (1743?-1843) and Mildred White (1745?-1807).  As a result of Mildred's death, Benjamin lived for about 11 years in the household of his brother, Robert White, Jr. (1784-1880).  Evidence of family involvement with music is the...

Christian, do you struggle

Christian, do you struggle. Bert Polman* (1945-2013). This is based on an ancient New Testament hymn text about Christian experience of conflict. Polman comments, in the Psalter Hymnal Handbook (p.751): The Christian battle is 'not against flesh and blood' but against the 'powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil.' It is a deadly serious battle that requires Christians to 'put on the full armour of God,' which his Word and Spirit provide. This spiritual warfare is...

Christ the Lord is risen again

Christ the Lord is risen again. Michael Weisse* (ca. 1480–1534), translated by Catherine Winkworth* (1827-1878). Weisse's hymn, 'Christus ist erstanden'*, is found in Ein new Geseng büchlen (Jungbunzlau, Bohemia, 1531), an early hymn book of the Bohemian brethren. Winkworth's translation was printed in Lyra Germanica II (1858), as the first hymn in the Easter section, entitled 'The Song of Triumph'. It had seven stanzas, each followed by 'Hallelujah'. The First Edition of A&M printed six...

City of God, how broad and far

City of God, how broad and far. Samuel Johnson* (1822-1882). Written in 1860, and first published in Hymns of the Spirit (Boston, 1864), a notable Unitarian hymnbook compiled by Johnson and his friend Samuel Longfellow*. It was entitled 'The Church the City of God'. It became renowned as a grand American poem, and was included in Edmund Clarence Stedman's An American Anthology (1900), as well as in many hymnbooks. The first words echo Saint Augustine, and 'one holy church' (verse 2 line 1) is...

Claudia Frances Hernaman

HERNAMAN, Claudia Frances (née Ibotson). b. Addlestone, Chertsey, Surrey, 19 October 1838; d. Brussels, 10 October 1898. Her father, the Rev. William Haywood Ibotson, was perpetual curate of Addlestone. She married the Rev. J.W.M. Hernaman, a school inspector. She was the author of The Child's Book of Praise: A Manual of Devotion in Simple Verse (1873), and co-editor (with Elizabeth Harcourt Mitchell and Walter Plimpton) of the Anglo-Catholic Altar Hymnal: A Book of Song for Use at the...

Clichtoveus

Clichtoveus. b. Nieuwport, Flanders, 1572; d. Chartres, France, 22 September 1543.  During the Renaissance it was common for learned authors to Latinize their names (cf. Andreas Gryphius*, Paul Speratus*). Judocus Clichtoveus Neoportuensis, usually referred to as 'Clichtoveus' was the name for Josse van Clichtove, educated at Leuven (Louvain) and Paris. He became Librarian of the Sorbonne before moving back to Flanders in 1519 with Louis Guillard, Bishop of Tournai. He later moved with...

David Holbrook

HOLBROOK, David Kenneth. b. Norwich, 9 January 1923; d. Cambridge, 11 August 2011. Educated at the City of Norwich School and Downing College, Cambridge, Holbrook fought in the Normandy campaign during World War II, landing in France on D-Day and later being wounded, before returning to Cambridge to complete his degree in 1947. He was a tutor at Bassingbourn Village College, Hertfordshire (1954-61), a Research Fellow of King's College (1961-65), and Fellow and Director of Studies in English at...

Fenton John Anthony Hort

HORT, Fenton John Anthony. b. Dublin, 23 April 1828; d. Cambridge, 30 November 1892. He was educated at Rugby School and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA, 1851). He became a Fellow of Trinity College, and took Holy Orders (deacon 1852, priest 1854). On his marriage in 1857 he resigned his Fellowship, and was appointed to a rural parish near Hitchin. He returned to Cambridge in 1872 as Fellow and Tutor of Emmanuel College, and was appointed Hulsean Professor of Divinity in 1878. With Brooke Foss...

Father of all, we come to Thee

Father of all, we come to Thee. Edwin Alec Blaxill* (1873-1953). Written in 1912, this remarkable and little known hymn is a neat versification of the Scout Promise ('On my honour, I promise that I will do my best/ To do my duty to God and the Queen/ To help other people/ and to keep the Scout Law.') Elements of the original Scout Law are found in stanzas 1 ('A scout is loyal…'),  2 ('A scout's honour is to be trusted'), 3-4 ('A scout's duty is to help other people'), 6 ('A scout smiles and...

George Thomas Smart

SMART, (Sir) George Thomas. b. London, 10 May 1776; d. London, 23 February 1867. He received his early musical education as a Child (chorister) of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, and began his career as organist of St James' Chapel, Hampstead Road (1791). A few years later he added a similar post at Brunswick Chapel and in 1822 he was appointed one of the two joint organists of the Chapel Royal. By the end of his career his inability to play the pedals was out-dated: when invited to try a...

God of unexampled grace

God of unexampled grace. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns on the Lord's Supper (1745) in nine 8-line stanzas, in the section entitled 'As it [the Sacrament] is a Memorial of the Sufferings and Death of Christ'. Though it was not included in John Wesley's A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (1780), it appeared in the 1831 Supplement, divided into two hymns. The first, consisting of stanzas 1-3 of the original, had earlier been included by...

Harold Edwin Darke

DARKE, Harold Edwin. b. London, 29 October 1888; d. Cambridge, 28 November 1976. Born in London, Darke studied the organ with Walter Parratt* at the Royal College of Music and composition with Stanford*. He was organist of St Michael's, Cornhill, London from 1916 to 1966, gaining a reputation for his performances of Bach* (in the style of Schweitzer) and for his regular Monday recitals. He also founded and conducted the City of London Choral Union in 1925, and the St Michael's Singers (1919-66)...

Herbert Howells

HOWELLS, Herbert Norman. b. Lydney, Gloucestershire, 17 October 1892; d. Putney, London, 23 February 1983. Howells was an articled student (with Ivor Gurney and Ivor Novello) of Herbert Brewer at Gloucester Cathedral (1909-12) and went on to study with Stanford* and Charles Wood* at the Royal College of Music (1912-17). He joined the teaching staff of the RCM in 1920 and taught there until 1979. Succeeding Gustav Holst*, he was also director of music at St Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith...

I bind unto myself today

I bind unto myself today. Cecil Frances Alexander* (1818-1895). This hymn, in its original Irish form has been attributed to St Patrick, although the dating and authorship remain obscure: in the Irish Liber hymnorum it is said to be 'a lorica [breastplate] of faith for the protection of body and soul against demons and men and vices'. The pagan king, Laoghaire, was confronted by Patrick at Tara in County Meath on Easter Eve: the druids were silenced, and Patrick lit the paschal fire on the hill...

In the dark and silent night

In the dark and silent night. Jane Eliza Leeson* (1808-1881).  First published in The Christian Child's Book (1848) (JJ, p. 670). It had three stanzas:  In the dark and silent night, Blessèd Lord, be Thou my light; So shall nothing me affright,  Hallelujah!  Safely shadowed 'neath Thy wing, Help Thy little one to sing, Glory to the heavenly King,  Hallelujah!  Angels sing, and so would I, While upon my bed I lie, Praise my Father silently,  Hallelujah!  This charming hymn for children...

Jakob Fabricius

FABRICIUS, Jakob. b. Köslin, Pomerania (now Koszalin, Poland), 19 July 1593; d. Stettin (now Szczecin, Poland), 11 August 1654. After school at Köslin and at the Prince's school at Stettin, he studied philosophy and theology (including Hebrew) at Lübeck and Rostock. He became a teacher at Köslin, and then succeeded his father-in-law as diaconus, before being summoned by Duke Bogislaw IV to be Hofprediger (chief preacher) at Rügenwalde. He was awarded a Doctorate of Theology from the University...

Johann Michael Altenburg

ALTENBURG, Johann Michael. b. Alach, near Erfurt, 27 May 1584; d. Erfurt, 12 February 1640. He was educated at school at Erfurt and at the University (BA 1599, MA 1603). He was a schoolmaster at Erfurt, first as a teacher at the Reglerschule and then as Rektor of the school connected with St Andreas' Church (1600-09). He was also Kantor at St Andreas' from 1601. In 1609 he left teaching to become a pastor, and was assistant at two parishes near Erfurt before becoming pastor at Tröchtelborn...

John Brownlow Geyer

GEYER, John Brownlow. b. Wakefield, Yorkshire, 9 May 1932; d. Tayport, Fife, 26 July 2020. He was educated at Silcoates School, Wakefield, the Congregational foundation for the sons of nonconformist ministers. After National Service (1951-53), he read Theology at Queens' College, Cambridge (BA 1956), and trained for the Congregational ministry at Mansfield College, Oxford (1956-59), with a period studying at Heidelberg (1957-59). He was minister of the Congregational Church, St Andrews, Fife,...

John Dryden

DRYDEN, John. b. Aldwincle, Northamptonshire, 9 Aug 1631; d. London, 1 May 1700. He was educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge (BA 1654). He became a civil servant under Cromwell, whom he admired, although at the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 he wrote a poem entitled Astraea Redux ('Justice led back again'). In the years that followed he acquired a distinguished name as a dramatist and poet, becoming Poet Laureate in 1667. He became active as a satirist, notably...

John Hampden Gurney

GURNEY, John Hampden. b. London, 15 August 1802; d. London, 8 March 1862. He was the eldest son of Sir John Gurney, a lawyer. He was educated at Chobham School, Surrey, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied law (BA 1824, MA 1827). After a short time as a lawyer he decided to take Holy Orders (deacon 1827, priest 1829) and served as curate of Lutterworth, Leicestershire (1827-44), rector of St Mary's, Bryanston Square (1847-62) and Prebendary of St Paul's Cathedral (1857-62). He was a...

John Morison

MORISON, John. b. Cairnie, Aberdeenshire, 1750 (baptized 12 June); d. Canisbay, Caithness, 12 June 1798. He was a student at King's College, Aberdeen, after which he became a private tutor, first at Dunnet, Caithness, then at Halkirk (1768-ca. 1771). For a short time in 1773 he was a teacher at Thurso, before moving to Edinburgh. He contributed poetical pieces to Ruddiman's Edinburgh Weekly Magazine under the pseudonym 'Musaeus', and met Dr Macfarlane, minister of Canongate Kirk, who was a...

John Richard Vernon

VERNON, John Richard. b. Louth, Lincolnshire, 1833; d. Williton, Somerset, 30 September 1902. Educated at Hertford College, Oxford, he took Holy Orders (deacon 1860, priest 1861), serving curacies at Sellindge, Kent (1860-64), Cheriton, Kent (1864-67), Newington, Kent (1867-69), Stogumber, Somerset (1869-71) and Streatham, south-west London (1871-74). He was rector of St Audries, West Quantoxhead, Somerset, from 1874 until his death. Vernon published many books on devotional topics. Probably...

Joseph Adam

ADAM, Joseph. b. perhaps Dundee, ca. 1843, date unknown; d. Bournville, Birmingham, 10 March 1919. According to the Churches of Christ periodical, The Bible Advocate ('Pleading for a Complete Return to the Faith and Practice of the New Testament Church'), 4 April 1919, he was born 'some seventy-six years ago in the city of Dundee'. Adam was trained as a carpenter, but became a Churches of Christ evangelist, trained at Birmingham by the great Churches of Christ evangelist David King (1819-1894)....

Lord of beauty, thine the splendour

Lord of beauty, thine the splendour. Cyril Argentine Alington* (1872-1955). First published in Eton Faces (Eton, 1933), the book which Alington published as a farewell to Eton when leaving to become Dean of Durham. It then appeared in the Eton College Hymn Book (Oxford, 1937) with the tune OBIIT, by Walter Parratt* (but many other tunes have also been used, including Basil Harwood*'s ST AUDREY). The 'burning sun' and 'moonlight tender' in the first stanza are reminiscent of the first stanza of...

Let sighing cease and woe.

Let sighing cease and woe. Charles Coffin* (1676-1749), translated by William John Blew* (1808-1894). Coffin's hymn, 'Iam desinant suspiria'* was written for Matins on Christmas Day. Blew's translation was dated 1852 by JJ, p. 577, where it was stated as 'not in C.U.' It was rescued from oblivion by the editors of EH, probably influenced by Percy Dearmer*, who, as a Christian Socialist, and a lover of the childlike, would have admired some of the stanzas, such as 4, 6 and 7 (the last):   We...

Martin Leckebusch

LECKEBUSCH, Martin. b. Leicester, 25 February 1962. Educated at King Edward VII College, Coalville, Oxford University and Brunel University. He works in the field of Information Technology, and has had links with Pentecostal, Methodist, Anglican and Baptist churches. He began writing hymns in 1987, and his work was first published in New Start (1999). By 2005 he had written some 350 hymns, of which 200 have been published, including metrical paraphrases of all 150 psalms. His texts have...

Michael Schirmer

SCHIRMER, Michael. b. Leipzig, 1606 (baptised 18 July); d. Berlin, 4 May 1673. He was educated at the Thomasschule at Leipzig, and studied theology at the University there. He was a youthful prodigy, who began his undergraduate study at the age of 13. He became Rektor at Freiberg (Saxony) in 1630, combining it with the post of pastor at Striegnitz. He was crowned as a 'King's Poet' in 1637. In 1636 he was appointed Sub-Rektor at the Gymnasium at the Greyfriars Cloister in Berlin, where he...

May God be near thee, friend

May God be near thee, friend. Henry Burton* (1840-1930). This was published in Burton's Songs of the Highway (1924), with the title 'To an Absent Friend'. Burton's poems or hymns were well known in the mid-20th century, and this one was chosen for The School Hymn-Book of the Methodist Church (1950). Stanza 3 was omitted, and there were some minor alterations (stanza 2, with an eye on the mission field, was altered in line 1 to 'In distant, desert places'):   May God be near thee, friend,    ...

Nahum Tate

TATE, Nahum. b. ca. 1652; d. 30 July 1715. Born of an Irish family, he was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1672). He moved to London in 1676, and became part of the London literary scene, where he became a friend of John Dryden* and published poems and translations from Ovid and Juvenal. He was active in the drama also, re-writing the end of Shakespeare's King Lear to give it a happy ending (which is not such a silly idea as it sounds: Dr Johnson approved of it, and it was played as the...

O quickly come, dread Judge of all

O quickly come, dread Judge of all. Lawrence Tuttiett* (1825-1897). Based on the last chapter of the Bible, Revelation 22: 12 and 20, this hymn was first published in Tuttiett's Hymns for Churchmen (1854), and included in the Second Edition of A&M (1875). Although beginning with a reference to Advent, it was rightly placed in the 'General Hymns' section, because the four stanzas refer to other aspects of the divine presence: O quickly come, dread Judge of all;  For, awful though Thine...

O God of heaven, we give thee thanks

O God of heaven, we give thee thanks. Anastasia Van Burkalow* (1911-2004). This four-stanza hymn, dated 1973, captures beautifully Anastasia Van Burkalow's passion for the planet she had spent a lifetime studying:   O God of heaven, we give thee thanks  for all thy gifts of light:the brilliance of the sun by day,  the moon and stars by night;and that most gracious Light of lights,  our Savior and our King,who came the night of sin to end,  eternal day to bring.  O God of earth, we give thee...

Robert Hawker

HAWKER, Robert. b. Exeter, 1753; d. Plymouth, 6 April 1827. He studied medicine at Magdalen Hall (now Hertford College), Oxford, and the title page of some of his published works describes him as 'D.D.'. He was described by Sabine Baring-Gould*, in the biography of his grandson, Robert Stephen Hawker*, as 'a man as remarkable for his abilities as he was for his piety' (1899, p. 1). He took Holy Orders and served as the incumbent of Charles Church, Plymouth, from 1784 until his death. Like many...

Ruth Thomas

THOMAS, Ruth ('Ruthie'). b. in England of African Caribbean parents, 7 July 1956. She grew up in Wales. She was a student at King Alfred's University College, Winchester, where she received a P.D. James Bursary and was awarded an MA in the School of English in Writing for Children. She has subsequently published two novels for children, Ruby Tucker (2008) and Different (2010). She is a gospel singer, performer, poet, and hymn writer whose work has appeared in a number of contemporary...

Richard Chenevix Trench

TRENCH, Richard Chenevix.  b. Dublin, 9 September 1807; d. London, 28 March 1886. He came from a distinguished family: his uncle Frederic was Lord Ashtown, and his great-grandfather was Bishop of Waterford. He was educated at Harrow School (1819-25) and Trinity College, Cambridge (1825-29: BA 1829; MA 1833), where he was a member of the exclusive 'Apostles' club, together with Alfred Tennyson* and Arthur Hallam. After a period spent travelling, he took Holy Orders (deacon 1832, priest 1835),...

Stephen Cuthbert Molefe

MOLEFE, Stephen Cuthbert. b.1917; d.1987. Molefe was born in the Transkei area of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, of Sotho descent. He worked with David Dargie* in composition workshops for the Lumko Institute throughout southern Africa in the 1970s and 1980s, and was a prolific musician. Molefe served as a choirmaster at the Catholic Church in Vosloorus. He was not only a skilled musician (writing music in Tonic Sol-fa* rather than staff notation) but also fluent in a variety of...

Shout the glad tidings, exultingly sing

Shout the glad tidings, exultingly sing. William Augustus Muhlenberg* (1796-1877). First published in the hymnal of the Episcopal Church in America (1826) entitled The Book of Common Prayer, and Administration of the Sacraments and other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church in the United States of America,  known as the 'Prayer Book Collection'. According to JJ, Muhlenberg said that it was written 'at the particular request of Bishop John Henry Hobart (1775-1830), who wanted something that would...

Stir me, O stir me, Lord, I care not how

Stir me, O stir me, Lord, I care not how. Bessie Porter Head* (1849/1850-1936). This hymn of five 6-line stanzas appeared in Lady Victoria Carbery*'s Church Hymnal for the Christian Year (1917), with the attribution to 'Mrs Albert A. Head' and the date 1913. It was prefaced by '“Stir into flame.” – 2 TIM. i. 6 (R.V. , marg.).' It is a hymn that strangely, and rather uncomfortably, combines a missionary zeal with a personal series of reflections. Stanza 1 lines 4-6 are: Stir, till the...

There's a light upon the mountains

There's a light upon the mountains. Henry Burton* (1840-1930). From Burton's Wayside Songs of the Inner and Outer Life (1883). According to Wesley Milgate (Songs of the People of God, 1982, p. 98), this hymn on Christ's coming in glory appeared in American books before British ones (Burton lived in the USA for most of his early life). In Britain it has been particularly popular with Methodists, since its first appearance in the Wesleyan Methodist School Hymnal (1911). There were five stanzas,...

Thy kingdom come, on bended knee

Thy kingdom come, on bended knee. Frederick Lucian Hosmer* (1840-1929). This was written in 1891 for the commencement exercises of the Unitarian Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pennsylvania (now part of Meadville Lombard Theological School, Chicago) on 12 June, and published in The Thought of God in Hymns and Poems (Boston, 1894 edition). It is based on the opening supplication of the Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6: 9-13): Thy Kingdom come! on bended knee  The passing ages pray;And...

Vera Evaline Walker

WALKER, Vera Evaline. b. Mirfield, Yorkshire, 24 November 1887; d. 28 March 1979. She was educated at a private school and at West Hill Teachers' Training College, Selly Oak, Birmingham. From 1910 to 1916 she lived in London, working at Whitefield's Central Mission, Tottenham Court Road. After a breakdown in health, she recovered at the Chaldecote Community, Charlton, south-west London, and returned to educational work. She became a member of King's Weigh House Chapel, London (formerly the...

Vexilla Regis prodeunt

Vexilla Regis prodeunt. Venantius Fortunatus* (c. 540 – early 7th century). This hymn (Poem 2.6), with 'Pange lingua gloriosi proelium certaminis'* (Poem 2.2), and 'Crux benedicta nitet' (Poem 2.1) were the first Christian hymns to the Cross, composed by Fortunatus to celebrate the arrival of relics of the Holy Cross from Byzantium in the convent of the Holy Cross in Poitiers in the 570s. Fortunatus articulated ideas and images that had been current since earliest Christian times, influencing...

We praise thy name, all-holy Lord

We praise thy name, all-holy Lord. Ebenezer Josiah Newell* (1853-1916). This hymn on Saint David (ca. 500- ca. 589) was included in EH and NEH, SofPE, and A&MR. The three stanzas in EH and subsequent books were selected from a hymn in seven stanzas on the Welsh saints, published in The Northern Churchman and St David's Weekly (29 February 1896, i.e. just before Saint David's day, 1 March). There is reference to David's noble birth (he was the son of Ceredig ap Cunedda, king of Ceredigion)...

William Drummond of Hawthornden

DRUMMOND, William, of Hawthornden. b. Lasswade, near Edinburgh (now in Midlothian), 13 December 1585; d. Lasswade, 4 December 1649. He was the son of Sir John Drummond (1553-1610), Laird of Hawthornden. He was educated at the High School of Edinburgh, and Edinburgh College (now the University of Edinburgh), MA 1605, followed by a time in France studying law. On the death of his father he became the Laird of Hawthornden, and lived at Lasswade, devoting his time to local affairs and to writing....

Soon and very soon

Soon and very soon. Andraé Crouch* (1945-2015).   This song was first published in sheet music form (Waco, Texas, 1976) (Daw, 2016, p. 384), and first heard in 1976 on Andraé Crouch and the Disciples' album, 'This is another day' (Companion to ICH5, 2005, p. 220). Stanza one is based on Revelation 22: 7 (and 12, 20). Stanzas 2 and 3 draw on Revelation 21: 3-4: 'Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with...

Thomas Ken

KEN, Thomas. b. Little Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire, July 1637; d. Longleat, Wiltshire, 19 March 1711. He was the son of Thomas Ken, an attorney. He was brought up by his brother-in-law, Isaak Walton (1593-1683), the biographer of John Donne* and George Herbert*. Ken was educated at Winchester College (1651-56), Hart Hall, Oxford, and New College, Oxford (BA 1661, MA 1664). He was appointed Tutor in Logic at New College in 1661, and took Holy Orders in 1661 or 1662. He was rector of Little...

Veni, Sancte Spiritus

Veni, Sancte Spiritus. Latin, author uncertain, early 13th century. This is the Sequence* used at Pentecost from the Middle Ages onwards, sometimes known as 'The Golden Sequence'. It is widely regarded as 'one of the masterpieces of Latin sacred poetry' (JJ, p. 1212). It was written in ten 3-line stanzas, the first two lines of each verse rhyming, the final line rhyming through the verses: Veni, sancte Spiritus, Et emitte coelitus Lucis tuae radium. Veni pater pauperum, Veni, dator...

Womb of life and source of being

Womb of life and source of being. Ruth C. Duck* (1947- ).  This hymn challenges the traditional language used in the Trinitarian formula. Duck believes that the exclusive, male-centered language, the traditional formula – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit – limits the understanding of the work of the Trinity. 'Womb of life and source of being' makes an effort to broaden the images of the persons in the Trinity and to establish it as a model for a vibrant community:  Womb of life, and source of...

We gather together to ask the Lord's blessing

We gather together to ask the Lord's blessing. Dutch hymn, 16th century, translated by Theodore Baker* (1851-1934) This is a translation of a German version of stanzas 1, 2, and 4 of a four-stanza Dutch hymn written at the end of the 16th century to celebrate the Protestant Northern provinces' newly won freedom from Spanish rule. That hymn was first published in a collection of 76 patriotic songs set to traditional folk melodies for voice, with independent scores for lute and cittern,...

Ach bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ

Ach bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ. Nikolaus Selnecker* (1530/1532 –1592). The first stanza of this evening hymn ('Abide with us, Lord Jesus Christ') appeared in a Nürnberg hymn book, Geistliche Psalmen, Hymnen Lieder und Gebett (1611). It is a translation of a verse from a Latin hymn by Philipp Melanchthon*, beginning 'Vespera jam venit'. The remainder of the hymn is by Selnecker. Stanza 2 is the second of two additional stanzas found in the Nürnberg 1611 book (see Wackernagel, Das Deutsche...

Cyriakus Günther

GÜNTHER, Cyriakus. b. Goldbach, near Gotha, 15 January 1650; d. Gotha, 7 October 1704. Günther was educated at Goldbach and at Gotha. He studied at the University of Jena, after which he was appointed 'Conrektor' at Eisfeld, Thuringia; he returned to Gotha in 1679 as 'Collega tertius' (third-form master) at the Gymnasium, remaining in that post until his death. At his death he left a notebook containing over thirty hymns. His son, Friedrich Philipp Günther, verger of St George's Church at...

Edith Florence Boyle Macalister

MacALISTER, Edith Florence Boyle. b. Dublin, 1873; d. Cambridge, 27 November 1950. She was the daughter of the Professor of Anatomy at Trinity College, Dublin, and the sister of Robert Alexander Stewart Macalister* (note the spelling of the surname: it changed to MacAlister on her marriage). She was educated in Dublin and Cambridge (her father had moved to Cambridge as Professor of Anatomy in 1883). She became a Primary School teacher. In 1895 she married a doctor who was a distant relative,...

Eduardo Hontiveros

HONTIVEROS, Eduardo. b. Molo, Iloilo City, 20 December 1923; d. 15 January 2008. This Filipino Jesuit musician was educated at Manila High School and the San Jose Seminary (1939-45). He entered the Society of Jesus in 1945, took novice's vows in 1947, studied theology in the USA, and was ordained in 1954. He is known as 'the father of Filipino liturgical music'. In October 2000, Pope John Paul II conferred on him the Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice bestowed on clergy and laypersons who have served...

Edwin Paxton Hood

HOOD, Edwin Paxton. b. London, 24 October 1820; d. Paris, 12 June 1885. He was from a poor family: his father was an able seaman and his mother was a domestic servant. Both of his parents died before he was seven years old and he was brought up at Deptford by a heraldic painter and his wife. He was self-educated and began to lecture on temperance and peace, ca.1840; he was greatly influenced by the powerful preaching of Thomas Binney*. He was ordained into the Congregational ministry in 1852,...

Emily Mary Chisholm

CHISHOLM, Emily Mary. b. Airdrie, Lanarkshire, 1 July 1910; d. Buckhurst Hill, Essex, 11 February 1991. She was educated at Glasgow High School and the University of Glasgow. She was a modern linguist, who also studied at the Sorbonne, Paris, and at Universities in Germany and Austria. After a short period teaching at Airdrie, she was appointed in 1938 to Loughton High School for Girls, Essex, where she later became Head of Modern Languages, remaining there until retirement in 1970. In...

Frances Elizabeth Cox

COX, Frances Elizabeth. b. Oxford, 10 May 1812; d. Oxford, 28 September 1897. She was a pioneer in the translation of German hymnody, publishing Sacred Hymns from the German in 1841 and Hymns from the German in 1864. The former contained 50 hymns in 1841, written in the same metre as the German, with the German text placed opposite the English. The preface stated that the hymns were 'taken from the large and interesting collection of Chevalier Bunsen, and it is hoped that the translations will...

God has spoken—by his prophets

God has spoken—by his prophets. George Wallace Briggs* (1875-1959). This hymn was written for the Hymn Society of America, which advertised for new hymns to celebrate the publication of the Revised Standard Version of the Bible in 1952. This was one of ten hymns chosen out of 500, appearing in Ten New Bible Hymns (1953), and subsequently in many books on both sides of the Atlantic and in WOV. This is such a valuable hymn that it has survived in spite of its archaic and non-inclusive language:...

Hark! hark! my soul! Angelic songs are swelling

Hark! hark! my soul! Angelic songs are swelling. Frederick William Faber* (1814-1863). First published in Faber's Oratory Hymns (1854) in seven 4-line stanzas, with the refrain 'Angels of Jesus, Angels of light,/ Singing to welcome the pilgrims of the night!' In Faber's Hymns (1861) it was given the title 'The Pilgrims of the Night'. It was included in the Appendix (1868) to the First Edition of A&M, with slight alterations and omitting stanzas 2 and 6: 2. Darker than night life's...

He looked beyond my faults

He looked beyond my faults. Dottie Rambo* (1934-2008).  'He looked beyond my faults (and saw my need)' (1967) is one of the most lasting contributions of Rambo. Alluding to John Newton*'s famous hymn in the incipit ('Amazing grace shall always be my song of praise'), this song has drawn the attention of well-known recording artists such as Elvis Presley, Barbara Mandrell, Johnny Cash, Whitney Houston, Pat Boone, and Sandi Patty (Drudge, n.p.). The pairing of the tune LONDONDERRY AIR with her...

I love to tell the story

I love to tell the story. Based on a poem by (Arabella) Katherine Hankey* (1834-1911). This hymn and its companion-piece, the better-known 'Tell me the old, old story'*, were written in 1866 during a period of recovery from illness. Hankey wrote a poem on the life of Jesus in two parts, entitled 'The Story Wanted' (29 January) and 'The Story Told' (18 November). This hymn is based on the second part, which tells the story of the Fall and Redemption in over 40 verses. This hymn does not bear...

John Ferguson

FERGUSON, John. b. Manchester, 2 March 1921; d. Birmingham, 22 May 1989. He studied Classics and Theology, becoming Professor of Classics at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He was subsequently founding Dean of Arts at the Open University, and President of the Selly Oak Colleges, Birmingham. Ferguson took part in the Dunblane Consultations from 1962 onwards (see Dunblane Praises*). He was a lay preacher in the Congregational Church, after 1972 in the United Reformed Church. He was a...

Leith Fisher

FISHER, (Malcolm) Leith. b. Greenock, Renfrewshire 7 April 1941, d. Glasgow, 13 March 2009. Educated at Greenock Academy, he studied Arts and Divinity at the University of Glasgow 1959-65 (MA, BD), and received a Diploma in Pastoral Studies from Birmingham University (1965-66). He was licensed by the Presbytery of Greenock, May 1965. On 18 January 1967 he was ordained by the Presbytery of Glasgow while assistant minister (1966-68) at Govan Old Parish Church, the church from which in 1938 George...

Long ago and far away (Fill the Cup)

Long ago and far away (Fill the Cup). Pat Mayberry* (1950– ).  This song was composed in 2000. It was recorded by children on the album Kids Songs for Choirs and Congregations (2004). The editorial note under this song in More Voices (2007) identifies it as a 'communion song for all ages.' It is written with children in mind yet possesses a depth of imagery that also nourishes adult spirits.  The song begins with the textual formula of countless traditional stories for children: 'Long ago and...

Nada te turbe

Nada te turbe. St Teresa of Avila* (1515-1582). According to P. Silverio, the editor of the works of Saint Teresa (Obras de Sta. Teresa de Jesus, Burgos, 1915-24, VI. 190), these lines were found in the breviary that she used in prayer during the Divine Office when she was dying at Alba de Tormes ('Guardaba Santa Teresa estas sentencias en el breviario que usaba para el rezo del oficio divino, cuando murió en Alba de Tormes'). They were: Nada te turbe, nada te espante, todo se pasa; Dios no...

Quem pastores laudavere

Quem pastores laudavere. Latin, 15th century. This carol is found in a German MS from Hohenfurth Abbey dated 1410. The tune has become better known than the words, although the Latin text was in the Oxford Book of Carols (1928) and is retained in NOBC. According to NOBC it was originally in three verses, beginning 'Quem pastores laudavere', 'Ad quem magi ambulabant' and 'Christo Regi, Deo nato': this refers to the shepherds ('pastores') in verse 1 and the Wise Men ('magi ambulabant', verse 2),...

Still the night, holy the night

Still the night, holy the night. Stopford Augustus Brooke* (1832-1916). This is one of many translations of the celebrated Austrian carol by Joseph Mohr* with music by Franz Gruber*. It was printed in Brooke's Christian Hymns (1881). It was used, with alterations, by the compilers of RCH, with the music harmonized by David Evans*. The alterations were as follows: BrookeRCH Still the night, Holy the night, Sleeps the world, yet the light Shines where Mary watches there, Her child...

Sweet the moments, rich in blessing

Sweet the moments, rich in blessing. Walter Shirley* (1725-1786). This hymn for Good Friday was first published in The Collection of Hymns, sung in the Countess of Huntingdon's Chapel (Bath, 1770). It was a re-writing of some stanzas by the Inghamite minister James Allen* beginning 'While my Jesus I'm possessing' (see JJ, pp. 1274-5). Part of this text was reprinted in The Church Hymnal (1853), edited by William Cooke* and William Denton*, with some additional stanzas beginning 'Lord, in...

Sing we of the Blessed Mother

Sing we of the Blessed Mother.  George Timms* (1910-1997). This hymn on the Blessed Virgin Mary was published in English Praise (1975), a supplement to EH. Timms chaired the committee that produced it, and this is one of the best of his 11 hymns in it. It was retained in NEH, and transferred some years later to the A&M tradition, being found in A&MCP and A&MRW. In Ireland it is included in ICH5 (2000). It is also found in the Roman Catholic Laudate (1999). It has become one of the...

Simon Kara Marak

MARAK, Simon Kara. b. near Kamrup, Assam, India, 1877; d. Jorhat, Assam, India, 16 February 1975. Simon Marak, an ethic A·chik (Garo) man, was a schoolteacher, pastor, and missionary in Assam, a state in far northeastern India. He received his primary education from the Guwahati Government School with the financial assistance of the Kamrup Baptist Association (1907–09) and continued his study at the Government Training School (1909–12), supplementing his early years of teaching with work as a...

There is a Name I love to hear

There is a Name I love to hear. Frederick Whitfield* (1829-1904). According to Harry Eskew (Handbook to the Baptist Hymnal [1991], 1992, p. 250) this hymn was first published separately on a hymn sheet, ca. 1855; but Whitfield's son said that it was written while his father was an undergraduate at Trinity College, Dublin, which places it between 1856 and 1859 (Whitfield, 1905, p. 6). It was included in Whitfield's Sacred Poems and Prose (Dublin, 1859), where it was the first hymn in the book....

Yield not to temptation

Yield not to temptation. Horatio Richmond Palmer* (1834-1907). First published in The National Sunday School Teachers' Magazine (1868), and in Palmer's Sabbath School Songs in the same year, this achieved wide circulation in hundreds of American and Canadian hymnals, and is still used in many books, especially those designed for young people. It is found in Britain in Scottish and in Irish books (Church Hymnary, 1898, RCH, CH3, ICH3, ICH4, ICH5). It was included in other British books such as...

Postcolonial and Decolonial Perspectives on Hymnody

Postcolonial and Decolonial Perspectives on Hymnody Introduction The recent adoption of the language of 'postcolonial' and 'decolonization' in the fields of hymnology and church music is part of a growing trend to address issues in ecclesial settings with post- and decolonial theoretical and theological lenses. Other academic disciplines are also widely adopting these theoretical approaches. For the purposes of this essay, postcolonial theory refers to intellectual analysis of the dynamic...

Jazz and congregational song, USA

  Jazz is a unique type of 20th-century music created by African Americans characterized by melodic variation, the use of 'blue notes', syncopated rhythms, extended and altered harmonies, improvisation by the performers, and an open-sounding timbre. Initially, jazz was the music of the dance hall and club, but it gradually gained acceptance in the church. Jazz used in worship now includes keyboard, instrumental, and choral music, as well as accompaniments of sung liturgies and congregational...

And now, my soul, another year

And now, my soul, another year. Simon Browne* (1680-1732).  This hymn was found in a number of British books in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was a shortened form of a dramatic hymn by Browne, from Volume 1 of his Hymns and Spiritual Songs, in Three Books, designed as a Supplement to Dr Watts (1720). It was entitled 'New Year's Day'. The original text is dramatic and revealing:  And now, my soul, another year  Of my short life is past: I cannot long continue here,  And this may be my...

Come, O thou Traveller unknown

Come, O thou Traveller unknown. Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). First published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1742) in fourteen 6-line stanzas under the title 'Wrestling Jacob', based on Jacob's encounter with the angel in Genesis 32: 24-32. It is also indebted to Matthew Henry's Commentary of 1708, which Charles Wesley used throughout his life. John Wesley* included the hymn in the 1780 Collection of Hymns for the use of the People called Methodists, omitting stanzas 5 and 7 of the original: 'Tis...

Great God, what do I see and hear

Great God, what do I see and hear. William Bengo Collyer* (1782-1854) and others. Stanza 1 of this hymn was published anonymously in a volume entitled Hymns for Public and Private Devotion (Sheffield, 1802), and subsequently in two books dating from 1810, John Kempthorne's Select Portions of Psalms from Various Translations, and Hymns, from Various Authors (JJ, p. 616) and Robert Aspland's Psalms and Hymns for Unitarian Worship. Collyer could have seen the verse in any one of these three...

Gospel Pearls

Gospel Pearls (1921) Published in 1921 by the Sunday School Publishing Board of the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Gospel Pearls is recognized as the first hymnal for African American congregations with 'gospel' in the title. It cast a profound influence on the African American worship tradition, and became known for its blend of traditional hymnody, gospel songs, spirituals, and songs by a new generation of black composers. The need for a new hymnal developed after a 1915 dispute over...

How blest the sacred tie that binds

How blest the sacred tie that binds. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1742-1825).  This was entitled 'Pious Friendship'. It was written, when Barbauld and her husband were living in Suffolk, for the marriage of Sarah Rigby and Caleb Parry at Palgrave in October 1778. Parry was a graduate of the Warrington Academy (McCarthy and Kraft, 1994, p. 274). The hymn was published in Barbauld's Poems (1792):  How blest the sacred tie that binds In union sweet according minds! How swift the heavenly course they...

When as returns this solemn day

  When as returns this solemn day. Anna Letitia Barbauld* (1742-1825).  This hymn was first published in Hymns intended to be used at the Commencement of Social Worship (1802), entitled 'Hymn XLV. Long Metre.' (McCarthy and Kraft, 1994, p. 301). It had three stanzas:  When, as returns this solemn day,   Man comes to meet his maker God, What rites, what honours shall he pay?   How spread his sovereign's praise abroad?  From marble domes and gilded spires Shall curling clouds of...

Hope Publishing Company

   Hope Publishing Company.  The Beginning: 1892-1922.  Hope Publishing Company was founded by Henry (Harry) Shepherd Date (1858-1915) in 1892. As a popular Methodist campground evangelist and organizer of the Young People's Alliance (later called the Epworth League), Harry saw the need for an appropriate gospel songbook that could be sold at a reasonable price and decided to publish such a book. He rented a one-room office to house his secretary, a portable pump organ, and the proof pages...

For ever with the Lord

For ever with the Lord. James Montgomery* (1771-1854). First published in The Amethyst: or Christian's Annual for 1834, in which there were twenty-two 4-line stanzas, in three parts: 4 stanzas; 9 stanzas; and 9 stanzas. It was published again in Montgomery's Poet's Portfolio (1835), in two parts of (1) 9 stanzas and (2) 13 stanzas. It was entitled 'At Home in Heaven. 1 Thess. 4: 17'. In the edition of Montgomery's Poetical Works of 1873, it was titled 'Anticipations of Heaven'. It contained a...

A toi la gloire, O Ressuscité

A toi la gloire, O Ressuscité. Edmond Louis Budry* (1854-1932). Companions and Handbooks have long been uncertain about the date of this hymn and its first printing. The Swiss National Library confirms that it was published in Chants Évangéliques (Lausanne, 1885), and in subsequent editions of that book (1886, 1889, 1892, 1896, 1908). It was well enough known in Switzerland to have been selected as one of the texts in Chants de Pâques à 2 ou 4 voix avec accompagnement d'Orgue (Lausanne, 1905)....

C. Austin Miles

MILES, C. (Charles) Austin. b. Lakehurst, New Jersey, 7 January 1868; d. Pitman, New Jersey, 10 March 1946. Educated at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and the University of Pennsylvania, Miles ended his pharmaceutical career in 1892 and turned to writing gospel music. His first song 'List, 'tis Jesus' voice' was accepted by the Hall-Mack Publishing Company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which led to his appointment as editor and manager, a post he continued after that company's merger in...

EACC Hymnal

EACC Hymnal (1963). This pioneering hymnbook was published in 1963 for the East Asia Christian Conference. The general editor was Daniel Thambyrajah Niles*, and the music editor was John Milton Kelly, assisted by his wife Edna and by Shanti Rasanayagam. The book was printed in Japan. The language used was English, the international language of Asia. The words and music were European/American for the first 'General Section' of 100 hymns (including 11 'Spirituals'), followed by an 'Asian...

Eugene M. Bartlett

BARTLETT, Eugene Monroe Sr. b. Waynesville, Missouri, 24 December 1885; d. Siloam Springs, Arkansas, 25 January 1941. Bartlett received his education at the Hall-Moody Institute in Martin, Tennessee, and at the William Jewell Academy, Independence, Missouri (1913-14). He served as president of the Hartford Music Company, in Hartford, Arkansas (1918-35), publishing songbooks and editing the company's music magazine, Herald of Song. He was associated later with the Stamps-Baxter Publications* in...

George Samuel Hodges

HODGES, George  Samuel. b. Walmer, Kent, 1827; d. Maidenhead, Berkshire, 10 December 1899. He was educated at Jesus College, Cambridge (BA 1851), and took Holy Orders (deacon 1851, priest 1852). He served curacies at Calbourne, Isle of Wight (1851-52), Farnham, Surrey (1852-55), Calbourne again (1856-58), Kirkham, Lancashire (1858-60), and  Fladbury, Worcestershire (1860-61), before becoming vicar of Wingates, Lancashire (1861-75). He was subsequently vicar of Dunston and Coppenhall,...

Give of your best to the Master

Give of your best to the Master. Howard B. Grose*(1851-1939). This was published in The Endeavor Hymnal (New York, 1902). It had three stanzas with a refrain: Give of your best to the Master, Give of the strength of your youth, Throw your soul's fresh, glowing ardor Into the battle for truth. Jesus has set the example, Dauntless was He, young and brave: Give Him your loyal devotion, Give Him the best that you have. Refrain: Give of your best to the Master, Give of the strength...

Helen H. Lemmel

LEMMEL, Helen Howarth. b.Wardle, Manchester, England, 14 November 1863; d. Seattle, Washington State, 1 November 1961. Her family immigrated to the USA when Helen was nine, living at Madison and Milwaukee. She became a travelling evangelist, organising a women's quartet that played and sang at (among other places) Lake Chautauqua (see Mary Artemisia Lathbury*). In 1904 she moved to Seattle, and became a member of Ballard Baptist Church while also continuing to travel widely as an evangelist....

Jesu, thy blood and righteousness

Jesu, thy blood and righteousness. Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf* (1700-1760), translated by John Wesley* (1703-1791). Wesley found Zinzendorf's 'Christi Blut und Gerechtigkeit' in the 1739 Appendix to Das Gesang-Buch der Gemeine in Herrnhut (1735). His free translation was published in Hymns and Sacred Poems (1740), with the title 'The Believer's Triumph. From the German': Jesu, Thy blood and righteousnessMy beauty are, my glorious dress:Midst flaming worlds, in these arrayed,With joy shall...

Joseph Medlicott Scriven

SCRIVEN, Joseph Medlicott. b. Seapatrick near Banbridge, Co Down, Ireland (later Northern Ireland), 10 September 1819; d. Port Hope, Ontario, Canada, 10 August 1886. The son of James Scriven and Jane Medlicott, he attended Addiscombe Military College, Surrey (1837-39), training for service in India. Owing to poor health he withdrew, returning to Ireland and studying at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1842). Impelled by his fiancée's drowning on the eve of their wedding, Scriven emigrated from...

Judson W. Van De Venter

VAN DE VENTER, Judson Wheeler. b. near Dundee, Michigan, 5 December 1855; d. Tampa, Florida, 17 July 1939. Educated at Hillsdale College, Michigan, he was a student of drawing and painting, with ambitions to be a great artist. He studied painting in Europe in 1885, before becoming a teacher of art. He supported himself financially by teaching at Sharon High School, Mercer County, Pennsylvania, becoming supervisor of art in the public schools of the city, and then in Bradford, Pennsylvania. He...

Like a child

Like a child. Daniel C. Damon* (1955- ). Words and music of this three-verse song are dated 1992. It was published in Faith Will Sing (Carol Stream, 1993), with a lilting tune by Damon himself. It has proved one of the most popular of Damon's texts: it celebrates the idea that Jesus comes like a child, 'claiming heart soul and mind' but also 'like a child on the street' with 'ragged clothes dirty feet'. It has been included in a number of books in the USA and in the Canadian VU. It has been...

Lobt Gott, ihr Christen alle gleich

Lobt Gott, ihr Christen alle gleich. Nikolaus Herman* (ca. 1500-1561). This Christmas hymn appears in Herman's Die Sontags Evangelia uber des gantze Jar, in Gesenger verfasset, für die Kinder und christlichen Haussvetter (Wittenberg, 1560). It had eight 4-line stanzas. It was the first of 'Drey Geistliche Weinacht Lieder, vom Newgebornen kindlein Jhesu, für die kinder im Joachimstal' ('Three Spiritual Christmas Songs of the new-born child Jesus, for the children in Joachimsthal'). It has...

Love's redeeming work is done

Love's redeeming work is done.  Charles Wesley* (1707-1788). The first stanza of this hymn is stanza 2 of Charles Wesley's 'Christ the Lord is risen today'*.  Wesley used quotation marks in the first line, presumably to indicate that he was echoing the first line of the hymn from Lyra Davidica (1708), 'Jesus Christ is risen today'*. He probably wanted to demonstrate that he could write a different, and greater, hymn than the three simple stanzas of Lyra Davidica. 'Christ the Lord is risen...

Let us draw near! The blood